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Suppose now I have a matrix

S = [1 1 1 2 2 2;
     1 1 1 2 2 2;
     2 2 2 2 1 1;
     2 2 2 2 1 1;
     2 2 2 2 1 1]

And another matrix

A = [1 2;
     2 4]

The first row in A is the unique indices of S, and the second row contains the values that the values in the first row will be replaced. That is, all "1"s in S will be replaced by 2, and all "2"s will be replaced by 4. Finally I'll get a matrix

SS = [2 2 2 4 4 4;
      2 2 2 4 4 4;
      4 4 4 4 2 2;
      4 4 4 4 2 2;
      4 4 4 4 2 2]

Right now what I'm doing is:

SS = zeros(size(S));
for i = 1:size(A,2)
    SS(S==index(A(1, i)) = A(2,i);
end

Now, I have a pretty big matrix, and using a for loop is a little bit slow. Is there a faster way to do that?

share|improve this question
    
You said "1"s will be replaced by "2"s, but SS still has "1"s... a mistake? –  Eitan T Sep 15 '12 at 21:08
    
@EitanT Sorry for that, already edited. –  luvegood Sep 15 '12 at 22:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the second output of ismember to give you indices of the values in row 1 of A. Use these indices to directly create matrix SS.

Example (changed initial values for clarity):

S = [5 5 5 3 3 3; 5 5 5 3 3 3; 3 3 3 3 5 5; 3 3 3 3 5 5; 3 3 3 3 5 5]; A = [5 3; 2 4];

>> [~, Locb] = ismember(S,A(1,:))
Locb =

     1     1     1     2     2     2
     1     1     1     2     2     2
     2     2     2     2     1     1
     2     2     2     2     1     1
     2     2     2     2     1     1

>> SS = reshape(A(2,Locb),size(S))
SS =

     2     2     2     4     4     4
     2     2     2     4     4     4
     4     4     4     4     2     2
     4     4     4     4     2     2
     4     4     4     4     2     2
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Neat. Can you add a comparison of execution times with my solution (I'm not near MATLAB right now)? –  Eitan T Sep 16 '12 at 0:13
    
@EitanT It's about 100 times faster than your solution. But thanks anyway, really learned a lot:) –  luvegood Sep 16 '12 at 15:51
    
No problem, I learned something too :) –  Eitan T Sep 16 '12 at 16:11

If I have understood your question correctly, I would use numpy array instead of standard python arrays or lists. Then the code becomes very simple as shown below:

# Import numpy
from numpy import array, zeros, shape
# Create the array S
S = array([[1,1,1,2,2,2],[1,1,1,2,2,2],[2,2,2,2,1,1],[2,2,2,2,1,1],[2,2,2,2,1,1]])
# Create the array A
A = array([[1,2],[2,4]])
# Create the empty array SS
SS = zeros((shape(S)))
# Actual operation needed 
SS[S==A[0,0]]=A[1,0]
SS[S==A[0,1]]=A[1,1]

Now if you see the array SS, it will look as follows:

SS
array([[ 2.,  2.,  2.,  4.,  4.,  4.],
       [ 2.,  2.,  2.,  4.,  4.,  4.],
       [ 4.,  4.,  4.,  4.,  2.,  2.],
       [ 4.,  4.,  4.,  4.,  2.,  2.],
       [ 4.,  4.,  4.,  4.,  2.,  2.]])

Sorry for the confusion earlier. I had (for some reason) assumed that this question was for Python (my bad!). Anyways, the answer for MATLAB is very similar:

SS = zeros(size(S))
SS(S==A(1,1))=A(2,1)
SS(S==A(1,2))=A(2,2)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but my tag is "matlab", sorry for the mis-understanding. –  luvegood Sep 15 '12 at 20:39
    
I am sorry about that. Actually I was myself looking for something regarding Python/Mayavi when I stumbled upon this question. And as I probably knew the answer, I just jumped in the help without looking at the tags. Next time I will be careful. Thanks. –  Indranil Sinharoy Sep 15 '12 at 21:32

You could go about this with an arrayfun one-liner, like this:

SS = arrayfun(@(x)A(2, (A(1, :) == x),  S)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, however, what if the indices in matrix S are not continuous, say the "2"s in S is "3". If this happens, I think I can only change the matrix A to add some entries in order to use your suggested codes. Is there another way to do that? –  luvegood Sep 15 '12 at 22:26
    
what I mean is, for a new matrix S, its indices are 1 or 3. And A contains information of say, 1->2, 3->6. In this case I couldn't use your suggested codes, because in your codes, n represent not only the column number of A, but also the actual value of S. As a consequence, either of your suggestions couldn't work because we'll meet an index exceeding error. –  luvegood Sep 15 '12 at 22:38
    
Oh I see. Please try my revised answer then. See if it's faster. –  Eitan T Sep 15 '12 at 22:55
    
arrayfun is generally not faster than a basic for loop unfortunately. It's worth testing - I'd like to see the results of a speed test - but I'm not hopeful for an increase in speed with this method. –  tmpearce Sep 15 '12 at 23:15

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