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I have a versioning mechanism for a Lesson model:

class Lesson < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :lesson_version_id, :number
  belongs_to :lesson_version
end

class LessonVersion < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :lesson_id, :version
  belongs_to :lesson
end

There's a 1-many relationship between Lesson and LessonVersion. I've modeled that by having belongs_to :lesson in the LessonVersion class. For now, I won't deal with the has_many :lesson_versions in the Lesson class part of that relationship.

Secondly, I also need to know the latest version for each lesson to be able to immediately pull it up. So in the Lesson model I need a reference to a LessonVersion. I guess this is a 1-1 type relationship.

Does this make sense to model it this way? Will I get in trouble having a belongs_to in each class to each other?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of creating another relationship, I would use a scope on LessonVersion.

class Lesson < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :number
  has_many :lesson_versions

  def most_recent_version
    lesson_versions.most_recent.first
  end
end

class LessonVersion < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :lesson_id, :version
  belongs_to :lesson
  scope :recent, order("created_at DESC")
end

Also, you might prefer to order by "version DESC" if version is an integer that increases with each new version.

EDIT: After reading your comment, I have two suggestions.

Suggestion 1

Use my solution above, but with "version DESC" for the sort, and when you want to revert to an older version, instead duplicate it and make it the newest version. Then you have a history of all edits and don't need

As for the order in the query, if you add a compound index on version and lesson_id in the database this will be a trivial operation. Also, calling #first on a scope is efficient, it will query with LIMIT 1 and only instantiate the record you care about. And the result of the query is automatically cached if you need to use this method multiple times in the same request.

Suggestion 2

Set up a belongs_to on Lesson, but name it :current_version so as to prevent confusion.

class Lesson < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :number, :current_version_id
  has_many :lesson_versions
  belongs_to :current_version, :class_name => "LessonVersion"
end

class LessonVersion < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :lesson_id, :version
  belongs_to :lesson
  scope :recent, order("created_at DESC")
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this, yes I think this will work. But to me this is pretty ugly. Every request for the lesson_version of a lesson will have to do that order operation (and there will be a lot of these requests). I also don't have the freedom then to maybe move the current lesson version to a previous version. – at. Sep 16 '12 at 6:13
    
Noted, I added an edit above with more suggestions. – nertzy Sep 16 '12 at 17:57
    
I like your 2nd suggestion. I'm not really worried about the confusing naming, it's not confusing to me to have lesson.lesson_version mean the current version. But yours is more clear. So does it matter? Would I run into trouble with having it my original way? – at. Sep 16 '12 at 22:08
    
The only trouble you would run into would be if another developer joins your project. When they see an association called lesson_version, then they might expect by Rails convention that it's the inverse of the belongs_to :lesson and that it's a has_one relationship. They would have to go into the model code to see that it actually has this other meaning which is non-standard. – nertzy Sep 19 '12 at 12:04

I think what you're looking for is has_and_belongs_to_many, which pecifies a many-to-many relationship with another class.

http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Associations/ClassMethods/has_and_belongs_to_many

share|improve this answer
    
But it's not a many to many relationship, it's 2 different relationships. It should be implemented as a foreign key in each table to each other. ActiveRecord's has_and_belongs_to_many creates an unnecessary (in my case) join table. – at. Sep 16 '12 at 6:09

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