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EDIT: I substantially changed my code to resemble the actual structure of the original code (which I can't post because I would have to write pages and pages explaining what everything is).


I've been struggling with this problem. I have six int arrays, ID1, ID2 and ID3, and array1, array2 and array3, where the names with the same indexes have the same length (len1, len2 and len3, respectively). The idea is that I'm re-creating them in a for loop, because the length of these arrays changes inside it. I'm doing this as follows:

/* Before entering the loop, I define these three arrays, where 
   len1, len2 and len3 are all equal to 100. */

int i,S,len1,len2,len3;
len1=100;
len2=100;
len3=100;
int* ID1; 
int* ID2; 
int* ID3;
ID1=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));
ID2=(int*) malloc((len2)*sizeof(int));
ID3=(int*) malloc((len3)*sizeof(int));
/* Then I fill the arrays with values from a loop which is not relevant 
   to my problem. Let's just fill them with a simple for loop: */
for(i=0;i<len1;i++){
    ID1[i]=i;
    ID2[i]=i;
    ID3[i]=i;
}
/* Now I enter a loop, in which I create 3 more arrays named array1, array2 
   and array3: */
for(S=98;S>=0;S--){
 printf("ID3[99]:%d (before)\n",ID3[99]); // 1st call to printf
 int* array1;
 int* array2;
 int* array3;
 array1=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));
 array2=(int*) malloc((len2)*sizeof(int));
 array3=(int*) malloc((len3)*sizeof(int));
 printf("ID3[99]:%d (after)\n",ID3[99]);  // 2nd call to printf
 /* I do more stuff here. Here len1, len2 and len3 changes, so I have to 
    re-create the "ID" arrays and the ones named "array". The idea is to fill 
    the new "ID1", "ID2" and "ID3" arrays with the values of another set of 
    arrays that I filled with values from complex calculations named 
    "AnotherArray1", "AnotherArray2" and "AnotherArray3". 
    The lenghts are always > 100.*/
 free(ID1);
 free(ID2);
 free(ID3);
 free(array1);
 free(array2);
 free(array3);
 int* ID1;
 int* ID2;
 int* ID3;
 ID1=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));
 ID2=(int*) malloc((len2)*sizeof(int));
 ID3=(int*) malloc((len3)*sizeof(int));
 for(i=0;i<len1;i++){
    ID1[i]=AnotherArray1[i];
 }
 for(i=0;i<len2;i++){
    ID2[i]=AnotherArray2[i];
 }
 for(i=0;i<len3;i++){
    ID3[i]=AnotherArray3[i];
 }
 /* Finally, I need to free the "AnotherArray" arrays, because in the loop 
    I need to create them again and do some complex calculations with the 
    "ID" arrays. */
 free(AnotherArray1);
 free(AnotherArray2);
 free(AnotherArray3); 
 printf("ID3[99]:%d (before, after starting the loop again)\n",ID3[99]); // 3rd call to printf
}

The problem is that when I do this, the 3rd call of the printf function is different from the 1st and 2nd calls (i.e., when the loop starts again, the value of ID3 in some of its elements suddenly changes!). I really don't know what's going on here...any advice? If you need more details, please let me know.

share|improve this question
    
Is narray1 a typo ? –  Mahesh Sep 15 '12 at 19:35
    
Oops, yeah it is! –  Néstor Sep 15 '12 at 19:36
2  
You will not find the problem here, because the problem isn't here. You need to show more of your code. –  user82238 Sep 15 '12 at 19:37
    
@Néstor Show your entire code. The code you showed seems fine to me. –  Mahesh Sep 15 '12 at 19:37
1  
Can you show us a Short, Self Contained, Correct (Compilable), Example, something we can copy-and-paste and try for ourselves? –  Keith Thompson Sep 15 '12 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

/* (array is created before the loop starts) */

printf("array[0]: %d (before)",array[0]);

printf("array[0]: %d (after)",array[0]);

int* array; array=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));

/* Fill array with some values, and the loop begins again */

I would note that you are allocating a new chunk of memory for the array each time. Since it is a different chunk of memory, it is likely to have different (garbage) values. I suspect that it would be a good idea to free(array) before mallocing it again.

There is a code smell in there

len2=100;
len3=100;
int* ID1; 
int* ID2; 
int* ID3;
ID1=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));
ID2=(int*) malloc((len2)*sizeof(int));
ID3=(int*) malloc((len3)*sizeof(int));

... 

int* ID1;
int* ID2;
int* ID3;
ID1=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));
ID2=(int*) malloc((len2)*sizeof(int));
ID3=(int*) malloc((len3)*sizeof(int));

You are declaring ID1, ID2 and ID3 a second time. That is likely to confuse the issue. It is effectivly a second set of variables. That may be the source of your problem.

I would note that the original allocation never gets freed.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited my code so it resembles the code I actually have. Thanks for you reply! –  Néstor Sep 15 '12 at 21:28
    
Indeed that was the problem! Erasing the (re)declaration of ID1, ID2 and ID3 all worked fine! Thank you very much! Can you explain why this was the problem? And, BTW, does this mean that the re-declarations of array1, array2 and array3 are likely to provoke the same problem? (maybe I should declare them in an if statement, just at the beggining of the loop). –  Néstor Sep 15 '12 at 21:49
    
(Or maybe I should declare them outside the loop). –  Néstor Sep 15 '12 at 21:52
    
i generally declare my pointers out side the loop, mallocate them them once, load them, process them, then free them. Pointers and dynamic memory allocation are places that it is easy to screw up. –  EvilTeach Sep 15 '12 at 22:08
1  
One other thing. Keep practicing. Experts are experts because they have worked through a lot of mistakes. You can be an expert too. Just keep practicing. –  EvilTeach Sep 15 '12 at 22:12

The problem is that array is not created before the loop, it is declared before the loop. It remains uninitialized until the assignment

array=(int*) malloc((len1)*sizeof(int));

at the very end. In the meantime, the pointer points at some location in the memory which happens to be readable. The memory is allocated to something else, though, and that something keeps changing. That's why the two printouts are different.

In general, you must not be dereferencing pointers before the first assignment; it is undefined behavior that could return junk, or could crash your program.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited my code so it resembles the code I actually have. I actually allocate the array before going inside the loop ;-). –  Néstor Sep 15 '12 at 21:28

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