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I'm using std::shared_ptr<T> for a lot of different types. Since I want to store all these different shared_ptrs in one vector, I thought having a std::vector<std::shared_ptr<void> >and cast to and from void if necessary.

I'm familiar with the following "bare pointer" usage

#include <iostream>

void print(void* void_ptr)
{
    int* int_ptr = static_cast<int*>(void_ptr);
    std::cerr << *int_ptr << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    int* int_ptr = new int(4);
    void* void_ptr = static_cast<void*>(int_ptr);
    print(void_ptr);
    delete int_ptr;
}

This works flawlessly with g++ and afaik it's the proper way to do this if you have bare pointers. But now I want to have the same with std::shared_ptrs.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

void print(std::shared_ptr<void> void_ptr)
{
    std::shared_ptr<int> int_ptr = ??(void_ptr); // simple cast won't work
    std::cerr << *int_ptr << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
    std::shared_ptr<int> int_ptr = std::make_shared<int>(4);
    std::shared_ptr<void> void_ptr = ??(int_ptr); // same problem here
    print(void_ptr);
}

Is this even possible? There are a lot of different types which I have shared_ptrs to, but these types have little in common. They don't share a base class or something like that (if that's the only way, I'll do that, but it would be definitively more awesome with some sort of shared_ptr<void>).

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1  
You might want to read the following question/answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/5913396/… . I'm more or less a newbie on that particular question, so I have no knowledge to share, but the info on that link chould help reach a viable solution for you. –  paercebal Sep 15 '12 at 20:50
    
If they don't have anything in common... why do you want to pass void*'s to them around? In general, if you're using void*, something has either gone terribly wrong, or you're trying to get a type out of a function's signature (ie: a function that can theoretically take any type, so that it can pass it to a function that takes a specific type). For the latter, you should be using boost::any, which is type-safe. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 15 '12 at 20:51
    
@NicolBolas: Basically I want to separate the "math" from "the code". I have classes that represent a mathematical structure. Of each such class there has to be an object in one class Foo. Now I want to have a layer which let's a foo object access math objects without knowing all of them. I take care of correct use and I consider void* as a "I have a pointer to something I want to pass around without all knowing what it really is.". I don't want to use boost. –  stefan Sep 15 '12 at 20:58
    
@stefan: "Now I want to have a layer which let's a foo object access math objects without knowing all of them." Which is exactly what inheritance is for. Now it's possible you may be doing something where inheritance doesn't work (calling different functions for two parameters and so forth), but unless that's the case, I don't see the problem. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 15 '12 at 21:01
    
@NicolBolas I'm not using custom classes alone but also a mixed range of integers, std::strings and stuff. A base class would just be messy, so I hoped for a imo nicer way. –  stefan Sep 15 '12 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

std::static_pointer_cast performs this function. However, this is generally an extremely bad idea- why not boost::any or boost::variant or something? This weakly typed and weakly enforced code will only bite you in the arse.

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The best solution to your issue may be type erasure.

Seeing as C++ doesn't allow implicit conversion between templates (even if their arguments are convertible).

So what you can do is define a common interface that you will hold in your containers (operator* and operator-> for starters), and than just use a thin template class over shared_ptr for the purpose of type erasure.

Edit:

As stated in the question @paercebal pointed you to, shared_ptr can perform type erasure on their own, when the template parameter is void. So you should look into that as well.

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I don't seem to get "type erasure". As far as I understood your linked article it seems to be just a common base class. Is that right? –  stefan Sep 15 '12 at 20:44
    
In a nutshell, yes. What you do is define the interface with a base class, and than create a template that implements it. That way you get the benefits of a common interface without enforcing a common base class for the types you can hold. –  StoryTeller Sep 15 '12 at 20:45

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