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For example we have Events in HTML like this:

<div onclick="bla(this)" class="gg">

How could we add an Event Listener/Handler to all the gg elements by not writing the onclick="bla(this)" thing in HTML?

I've tried something like this. But of course it does not work.

var ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for (var i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++) {
// the 'this' below needs to go somewhere to become working
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click',bla,this); 
}

EDIT: The original code works http://jsfiddle.net/pVpaV/2/ . To make the code to work I need to put it at the end of the page.

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bla will be called in the context of the gg element by default, you don't need to pass it as a param. –  zzzzBov Sep 15 '12 at 20:49
    
@zzzzBov Not in OP's case, since he's invoking the handler via the "onclick" attribute... –  Šime Vidas Sep 15 '12 at 20:59
    
I don't get it. What is the problem now? None of the answers are correct? You can't properly state your question? You can't copy-paste correctly? What is it? –  Alexander Sep 15 '12 at 21:40
    
@ŠimeVidas, I'd been referring to the part where bla was being passed to addEventListener. –  zzzzBov Sep 16 '12 at 0:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you need to keep using bla as it was originally, you'll need to wrap it and pass the appropriate parameter:

var ggs,
    i;
ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for (i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++) {
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', function (e) {
        //in the event handler, `this` refers to the clicked element
        bla(this);
    }, false);
}

If you simply need to call bla in the context of the element that triggered the event, addEventListener already does that by default.

var ggs,
    i;
function bla(e) {
    //`e` is event data
    //`this` is the element that triggered the event
}
ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for (i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++) {
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', bla, false);
}
share|improve this answer

your code should work fine provided you have a function called bla

http://jsfiddle.net/pVpaV/

One thing to note is that some versions of IE use a legacy method called attachEvent(). Which browser are you using?

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I don't understand why it does not work for me (last Chrome)... Wondering –  Hypn0tizeR Sep 15 '12 at 21:08

So what you want to do is handle click events on divs that have the class gg

jQuery can do this quite easily

$('.gg').click(function() {
// some code you want to execute on click
});

You can check out the jQuery class selector here

With just javascript (although support for getElementsByClassName is limited):

var ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for (var i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++)
{
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', function() { bla(this); }, true);
}
function bla(param)
{
    // some very sinister code that uses this (which is param in this context)
    alert(param);
}
share|improve this answer
    
They're after pure JS, but this is the easiest meyhod –  SpaceBeers Sep 15 '12 at 20:48
    
Is there a way to do it in pure JS with no frameworks? –  Hypn0tizeR Sep 15 '12 at 20:50
    
Of course there is. The frameworks use JS don't they? –  Dennis Traub Sep 15 '12 at 20:53
    
Nothing works for me in any browser... WTF? –  Hypn0tizeR Sep 15 '12 at 21:25
var ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for(var i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++) {
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', bla);
}

The element is automatically passed as this when using addEventListener. Note that you actually need to use this inside the function - it's not an argument. If you do want an argument the easiest and most portable way is this one:

var ggs = document.getElementsByClassName('gg');
for(var i = 0; i < ggs.length; i++) {
    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', function() {
        bla(this);
    });
}

However, in this case you cannot access the event object passed to the function by the browser unless you pass it as an additional argument:

    ggs[i].addEventListener('click', function(e) {
        bla(this, e);
    });
share|improve this answer
    
No, he wants the target element as a first argument of bla; the event handler is bound to the target element by default, so no need to do anything extra to achieve what you do so explicitly. –  lanzz Sep 15 '12 at 20:53
    
Yeah, I misunderstood the MDN article about it first. –  ThiefMaster Sep 15 '12 at 20:59
    
Your second and third code blocks will not work correctly, as the event handlers will execute after the entire for loop has finished and i will be equal to ggs.length regardless of which element is clicked. There is really no need to reference ggs[i], since this in the handler is already a reference to the same element and you can use it directly. –  lanzz Sep 15 '12 at 21:01
    
oops, gotcha. Funny how I answered lots of questions where the OP had exactly that problem and then stumbled into it myself... –  ThiefMaster Sep 15 '12 at 21:02

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