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I want to write a query like this:

SELECT o.OrderId, MAX(o.NegotiatedPrice, o.SuggestedPrice)
FROM Order o

But this isn't how the MAX function works, right? It is an aggregate function so it expects a single parameter and then returns the MAX of all rows.

Does anyone know how to do it my way?

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7  
That's implemented in most other databases as the GREATEST function; SQLite emulates support by allowing multiple columns in the MAX aggregate. –  OMG Ponies Oct 21 '10 at 15:54
2  

17 Answers 17

up vote 81 down vote accepted

You'd need to make a User-Defined Function if you wanted to have syntax similar to your example, but could you do what you want to do, inline, fairly easily with a CASE statement, as the others have said.

The UDF could be something like this:

create function dbo.InlineMax(@val1 int, @val2 int)
returns int
as
begin
  if @val1 > @val2
    return @val1
  return isnull(@val2,@val1)
end

... and you would call it like so ...

SELECT o.OrderId, dbo.InlineMax(o.NegotiatedPrice, o.SuggestedPrice) 
FROM Order o
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12  
I would support you solution, the only thing I would add is the support for NULL values. If you simply modify the final line: "return @value2" to read as: "return isnull(@val2,@val1)" then if one of the values is null the function will return the not null value, otherwise it will work as normal –  kristof Sep 24 '08 at 10:32
4  
this will be incredibly slow, as all things scalar UDFs. Use inline UDFs instead –  A-K Oct 21 '10 at 16:55
2  
@Thomas Replace > with < . –  xan Dec 16 '11 at 11:23
6  
@xan I have no clue what went through my mind when I actually asked that question. Not too much, obviously. Thanks for the answer anyway. –  Thomas Dec 16 '11 at 13:21
7  
@Thomas Obligatory meme image (no offence intended to you in any way!) flickr.com/photos/16201371@N00/2375571206 –  xan Dec 19 '11 at 15:58

If you're using SQL Server 2008 (or above), then this is the better solution:

SELECT o.OrderId,
       (SELECT MAX(Price)
        FROM (VALUES (o.NegotiatedPrice),(o.SuggestedPrice)) AS AllPrices(Price))
FROM Order o

All credit and votes should go to Sven's answer to a related question, "SQL MAX of multiple columns?"
I say it's the "best answer" because:

  1. It doesn't require complicating your code with UNION's, PIVOT's, UNPIVOT's, UDF's, and crazy-long CASE statments.
  2. It isn't plagued with the problem of handling nulls, it handles them just fine.
  3. It's easy to swap out the "MAX" with "MIN", "AVG", or "SUM". You can use any aggregate function to find the aggregate over many different columns.
  4. You're not limited to the names I used (i.e. "AllPrices" and "Price"). You can pick your own names to make it easier to read and understand for the next guy.
  5. You can find multiple aggregates using SQL Server 2008's derived_tables like so:
    SELECT MAX(a), MAX(b) FROM (VALUES (1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6), (7, 8), (9, 10) ) AS MyTable(a, b)
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11  
+1 only answer that doesn't require access to create procedure/functions! –  Alex Apr 16 '12 at 11:25
2  
Exactly the type of answer I was looking for. Using functions is slow and this will also work on dates, which is what I need. –  Johann Strydom Jun 29 '12 at 11:08
1  
+1 Works perfect, especially for more than 2 columns to be compared! –  JanW Aug 30 '12 at 10:44
3  
This is less performant than the CASE WHEN solution which only needs to compute a scalar. –  oliman Mar 31 '13 at 1:21
2  
While the simpler syntax is may never worth the performance hit when determining the MAX of 2 values, it may be a different matter with more values. Even when obtaining the MAX of 4 values the CASE clauses become long, clumsy and error prone if hand-generated while the VALUES clause remains simple and clear. –  Typhlosaurus Jun 16 at 15:05

Can be done in one line:

-- the following expression calculates ==> max(@val1, @val2)
SELECT 0.5 * ((@val1 + @val2) + ABS(@val1 - @val2)) 

Edit: If you're dealing with very large numbers you'll have to convert the value variables into bigint in order to avoid an integer overflow.

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9  
+1 I believe you have provided the most correct way. "SELECT ((@val1+@val2) + ABS(@val1-@val2))/2 as MAX_OF_TWO" Also remember, "SELECT ((@val1+@val2) - ABS(@val1-@val2))/2 as MIN_OF_TWO". –  tom Jun 4 '09 at 20:00
4  
This way will give an overflow error if the sum is greater than can be stored in an int: declare @val1 int declare @val2 int set @val1 = 1500000000 set @val2 = 1500000000 SELECT 0.5 * ((@val1 + @val2) + ABS(@val1 - @val2)) -- => overflow error –  AakashM Jun 10 '09 at 13:02
28  
This is extremely "dirty" "trick". When programming your code should explicitly express the aim, however in your case it looks like code taken from obfuscation contest. –  greenoldman Jan 11 '11 at 9:50
13  
It may be "dirty", but it could be the only option for databases with simple SQL dialects. –  splattne Jan 11 '11 at 12:16
8  
I disagree with marcias. Code doesnt necessarily itself need to explicitly express the aim, as long as comments allow one to work it out. If you are doing any complex mathematical equations in code (or anywhere) its sometimes kind of hard to make it self descriptive. As long as its broken up into simpler, easier to understand parts then that is correct programming. –  Rob Mar 18 '11 at 4:32

I don't think so. I wanted this the other day. The closest I got was:

SELECT
  o.OrderId,
  CASE WHEN o.NegotiatedPrice > o.SuggestedPrice THEN o.NegotiatedPrice 
     ELSE o.SuggestedPrice
  END
FROM Order o
share|improve this answer
1  
This is my favorite method. You don't risk an overflow, and it's less cryptic than splattne's solution (which is cool btw), and I don't have the hassle of creating a UDF. case is very handy in many situations. –  Lance Fisher Dec 23 '11 at 22:29
4  
+1 for straightforward solution, but you don't handle nulls. –  Johan Feb 10 '12 at 15:11
1  
Perfect for a one-off –  watkinsmatthewp Jul 31 '13 at 20:38
DECLARE @MAX INT
@MAX = (SELECT MAX(VALUE) 
               FROM (SELECT 1 AS VALUE UNION 
                     SELECT 2 AS VALUE) AS T1)
share|improve this answer
    
I give this solution a +1 because it conforms to DRY (don't repeat yourself) without the need to write a UDF. It's also great if both the values you need to check are the results of other sql, eg in my case I want to find the greater of 2 select count(*) statements. –  MikeKulls Mar 22 '12 at 23:41
1  
I hate that I have to resort to this solution, but it's for sure the best way to do it in SQL Server until they add native support for GREATEST or in-line MAX. Thanks for posting it - +1 to you! –  SqlRyan May 4 '12 at 19:48

The other answers are good, but if you have to worry about having NULL values, you may want this variant:

SELECT o.OrderId, 
   CASE WHEN ISNULL(o.NegotiatedPrice, o.SuggestedPrice) > ISNULL(o.SuggestedPrice, o.NegotiatedPrice)
        THEN ISNULL(o.NegotiatedPrice, o.SuggestedPrice)
        ELSE ISNULL(o.SuggestedPrice, o.NegotiatedPrice)
   END
FROM Order o
share|improve this answer

I would go with the solution provided by kcrumley Just modify it slightly to handle NULLs

create function dbo.HigherArgumentOrNull(@val1 int, @val2 int)
returns int
as
begin
  if @val1 >= @val2
    return @val1
  if @val1 < @val2
    return @val2

 return NULL
end

EDIT Modified after comment from Mark. As he correctly pointed out in 3 valued logic x > NULL or x < NULL should always return NULL. In other words unknown result.

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1  
Nulls are important. And it's important to handle them consistently. The only proper answer to Is NULL > x is NULL. –  Mark Brackett Oct 10 '08 at 0:27
    
You are right, i will modify my answer to reflect that, thanks for pointing that out –  kristof Oct 13 '08 at 7:48
    
If we pass an int and a NULL then I think it's more common to want the non-null value returned, so the function is acting as a combination of Max(x,y) and ISNULL(x,y). Hence I personally would change the last line to be: return ISNULL(@val1, @val2) - which admittedly is probably what you had to start with :) –  locster Oct 26 '09 at 14:17
    
@the-locster, see comment by Mark –  kristof Jan 17 '10 at 1:32
1  
this will be incredibly slow, as all things scalar UDFs. Use inline UDFs instead –  A-K Oct 21 '10 at 16:55

Sub Queries can access the columns from the Outer query so you can use this approach to use aggregates such as MAX across columns. (Probably more useful when there is a greater number of columns involved though)

;WITH [Order] AS
(
SELECT 1 AS OrderId, 100 AS NegotiatedPrice, 110 AS SuggestedPrice UNION ALL
SELECT 2 AS OrderId, 1000 AS NegotiatedPrice, 50 AS SuggestedPrice
)
SELECT
       o.OrderId, 
       (SELECT MAX(price)FROM 
           (SELECT o.NegotiatedPrice AS price 
            UNION ALL SELECT o.SuggestedPrice) d) 
        AS MaxPrice 
FROM  [Order]  o
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! It scales up very well. –  greenoldman Jan 11 '11 at 9:52

Oops, I just posted a dupe of this question...

The answer is, there is no built in function like Oracle's Greatest, but you can achieve a similar result for 2 columns with a UDF, note, the use of sql_variant is quite important here.

create table #t (a int, b int) 

insert #t
select 1,2 union all 
select 3,4 union all
select 5,2

-- option 1 - A case statement
select case when a > b then a else b end
from #t

-- option 2 - A union statement 
select a from #t where a >= b 
union all 
select b from #t where b > a 

-- option 3 - A udf
create function dbo.GREATEST
( 
    @a as sql_variant,
    @b as sql_variant
)
returns sql_variant
begin   
    declare @max sql_variant 
    if @a is null or @b is null return null
    if @b > @a return @b  
    return @a 
end


select dbo.GREATEST(a,b)
from #t

kristof

Posted this answer:

create table #t (id int IDENTITY(1,1), a int, b int)
insert #t
select 1,2 union all
select 3,4 union all
select 5,2

select id, max(val)
from #t
    unpivot (val for col in (a, b)) as unpvt
group by id
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1  
Note: the GREATEST function implementation will match the oracle behavior for 2 params, if any param is null it will return null –  Sam Saffron Oct 13 '08 at 11:41
1  
You should be careful when using sql_variant. Your function will give an unexpected result in the following situation: SELECT dbo.greatest(CAST(0.5 AS FLOAT), 100) –  Neil Jun 2 '11 at 15:43

I probably wouldn't do it this way, as it's less efficient than the already mentioned CASE constructs - unless, perhaps, you had covering indexes for both queries. Either way, it's a useful technique for similar problems:

SELECT OrderId, MAX(Price) as Price FROM (
   SELECT o.OrderId, o.NegotiatedPrice as Price FROM Order o
   UNION ALL
   SELECT o.OrderId, o.SuggestedPrice as Price FROM Order o
) as A
GROUP BY OrderId
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You can do something like this:

select case when o.NegotiatedPrice > o.SuggestedPrice 
then o.NegotiatedPrice
else o.SuggestedPrice
end
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SELECT o.OrderID
CASE WHEN o.NegotiatedPrice > o.SuggestedPrice THEN
 o.NegotiatedPrice
ELSE
 o.SuggestedPrice
END AS Price
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CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fnMax] (@p1 INT, @p2 INT)
RETURNS INT
AS BEGIN

    DECLARE @Result INT

    SET @p2 = COALESCE(@p2, @p1)

    SELECT
        @Result = (
                   SELECT
                    CASE WHEN @p1 > @p2 THEN @p1
                         ELSE @p2
                    END
                  )

    RETURN @Result

END
share|improve this answer

In its simplest form...

CREATE FUNCTION fnGreatestInt (@Int1 int, @Int2 int )
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN

    IF @Int1 >= ISNULL(@Int2,@Int1)
        RETURN @Int1
    ELSE
        RETURN @Int2

    RETURN NULL --Never Hit

END
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SQL Server 2012 introduced IIF:

SELECT 
    o.OrderId, 
    IIF( ISNULL( o.NegotiatedPrice, 0 ) > ISNULL( o.SuggestedPrice, 0 ),
         o.NegotiatedPrice, 
         o.SuggestedPrice 
    )
FROM 
    Order o

Handling NULLs is recommended when using IIF, because a NULL on either side of your boolean_expression will cause IIF to return the false_value (as opposed to NULL).

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For the answer above regarding large numbers, you could do the multiplication before the addition/subtraction. It's a bit bulkier but requires no cast. (I can't speak for speed but I assume it's still pretty quick)

SELECT 0.5 * ((@val1 + @val2) + ABS(@val1 - @val2))

Changes to

SELECT @val1*0.5+@val2*0.5 + ABS(@val1*0.5 - @val2*0.5)

at least an alternative if you want to avoid casting.

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Its as simple as this:

CREATE FUNCTION InlineMax
(
    @p1 sql_variant,
    @p2 sql_variant
)  RETURNS sql_variant
AS
BEGIN
    RETURN CASE 
        WHEN @p1 IS NULL AND @p2 IS NOT NULL THEN @p2 
        WHEN @p2 IS NULL AND @p1 IS NOT NULL THEN @p1
        WHEN @p1 > @p2 THEN @p1
        ELSE @p2 END
END;
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protected by Tim Medora Jan 23 at 20:29

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