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I can't figure out why this isn't working:

$(document).ready(function() {
    if ($('.checkarea.unchecked').length) {
       $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('checked').addClass('unchecked');
}
else {
    $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('unchecked').addClass('checked');
}
});

Here's a screenshot of the HTML structure: http://cloud.lukeabell.com/JV9N (Updated with correct screenshot)

Also, there has to be a better way to find the parent of the item (there are multiple of these elements on the page, so I need it to only effect the one that is unchecked)

Here's some other code that is involved that might be important:

$('.toggle-open-area').click(function() {
        if($(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().hasClass('open')) {
              $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('open').addClass('closed');
          }
          else {
              $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('closed').addClass('open');
          }
    });


    $('.checkarea').click(function() {
        if($(this).hasClass('unchecked')) {
              $(this).removeClass('unchecked').addClass('checked');
              $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('open').addClass('closed');
          }
          else {
              $(this).removeClass('checked').addClass('unchecked');
              $(this).parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().parent().removeClass('closed').addClass('open');
          }
    }); 

(Very open to improvements for that section as well)

Thank you so much!

Here's a link to where this is all happening: http://linkedin.guidemytech.com/sign-up-for-linkedin-step-2-set-up-linkedin-student/


Update:

I've improved the code from the comments, but still having issues with that first section not working.

$(document).ready(function() {
if ($('.checkarea.unchecked').length) {
    $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('checked').addClass('unchecked');
}
else {
    $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('unchecked').addClass('checked');
}
});

--

  $('.toggle-open-area').click(function() {
        if($(this).parents('.whole-step').hasClass('open')) {
              $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('open').addClass('closed');
          }
          else {
              $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('closed').addClass('open');
          }
    });


    $('.toggle-open-area').click(function() {
        $(this).toggleClass('unchecked checked');
        $(this).closest(selector).toggleClass('open closed');
    });


    $('.checkarea').click(function() {
        if($(this).hasClass('unchecked')) {
              $(this).removeClass('unchecked').addClass('checked');
              $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('open').addClass('closed');
          }
          else {
              $(this).removeClass('checked').addClass('unchecked');
              $(this).parents('.whole-step').removeClass('closed').addClass('open');
          }
    }); 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

wow, you can use closest or parents() method.

closest( selector )Get the first element that matches the selector, beginning at the current element and progressing up through the DOM tree.

parents( [selector] )Get the ancestors of each element in the current set of matched elements, optionally filtered by a selector.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for both alternatives. As a side-note to OP, if the element you are looking for is definitely a parent use parents() instead of closest() as closest() will also check siblings of parents as far as I know which adds unnecessary overhead in that specific scenario. –  François Wahl Sep 15 '12 at 21:36
    
Great, that helps me with the second part. Thanks! - Any idea why the first part of code doesn't work? (I updated with the new code) –  Luke Abell Sep 15 '12 at 21:38
2  
@FrançoisWahl On the contrary, if you're trying to match a single parent you almost always want to use .closest. It only matches ancestors and self (no siblings), and it stops traversing as soon as it hits the desired element, as opposed to .parents which will traverse the tree all the way to the root node and collect all ancestors, then filter the collection using the selector, and return all matching ancestors. –  nbrooks Sep 15 '12 at 22:14
1  
@nbrooks: +1. My as far as I know was indeed incorrect :). I just read over the notes again and only noticed now after you said that the explanation given on the closest() documentation. You are indeed correct it seems that closest() stops at a match while parents() collects all parents before filtering a match. This is interesting. Unless I'm miss-reading this, would that mean closest() is always better? Even this test on jsperf shows any variation of closest() is faster than parents() jsperf.com/jquery-parents-vs-closest/8 What's the point of parents() then? –  François Wahl Sep 15 '12 at 22:39
1  
@FrançoisWahl You're right, it is better in most cases -- but it depends on your use-case; if for some reason you wanted to match all div ancestors of a certain node, .parents('div') would work while .closest('div') wouldn't –  nbrooks Sep 16 '12 at 0:43

I'd suggest:

$('.toggle-open-area').click(function() {
    $(this).toggleClass('unchecked checked');
    $(this).closest(appropriateSelector).toggleClass('open closed');
});

Incidentally, I can't provide an actual selector in place of appropriateSelector because your posted image1 doesn't (seem to) include that particular element.

References:


1. You realise you could include the actual mark-up in the question? It's much more convenient that way, and far easier to work with (create demos from, correct typos, retain usefulness in the event the external site falls over, dies or reorganises its content...).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, updated with link to page and better screenshot. –  Luke Abell Sep 15 '12 at 21:28

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