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I have created my self signed certification and installed it to my client's Trusted root and used to .pfx [server side] to confirm that certification and the Authentication is going smoothly without any errors

But there is a question that really confuses me is there any way for a hacker to fake the authentication with my client ? with his fake cert and server ?

Example :

My code to validate the certification is

    private static bool OnCertificateValidation(
        object sender,
        X509Certificate certificate,
        X509Chain chain,
        SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
    {
        if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.None)
        {
            if (CaVerify(chain) && ServerVerify(certificate)) return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static bool CaVerify(X509Chain chain)
    {
        if (chain.ChainElements.Count > 0)
        {
            var certHash = chain.ChainElements[chain.ChainElements.Count - 1].Certificate.GetCertHash();
            if (certHash.Length == ApiCertHash.Length)
            {
                for (var idx = 0; idx < certHash.Length; idx++)
                {
                    if (certHash[idx] == ApiCertHash[idx])
                    {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return false;
    }

    public static bool ServerVerify(X509Certificate certificate)
    {
        var certHash = certificate.GetCertHash();

        if (certHash.Length == ApiCertHash.Length)
        {
            for (var idx = 0; idx < certHash.Length; idx++)
            {
                if (certHash[idx] == ApiCertHash[idx])
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }

        }
        return false;
    }

So could some one create a fake certification.pfx and associate it to his fake server and connect my client to his fake server ?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Common Name (CN) field of the SSL certificate should be the DNS name of the host you are are trying to connect to. You are "Trusting" the "Trusted Root Certificate Authorites" that they will not issue a certificate with a CN without validating ownership of DNS name listed in the CN.

You have bypassed this by manually adding a Certificate Authority (CA) to the Trusted list. So the computer trusts your personal CA that the certificate it received from the server is authorized to be used for whatever CN listed on the certificate.

A attacker can not make a "Fake" certificate as the CA who issued the unauthorized certificate is not "Trusted" so the validation fails.


This is how coperate proxies often work. The IT department installs a CA on the workstations. When you make a SSL request it goes through the proxy, when the reply comes back the proxy intercepts "CN=*.google.com Signed by VeriSign" and sends to your workstation "CN=*.google.com, Signed by XYZ Corperate Proxy". Because the IT pre-installed the Trusted Root CA the browser does not complain.

However if you use some browser that does not use the normal store, or does not have CA installed you would get a certificate error as your computer would see the "Signed by XYZ Coperate Proxy" cert, not know who that CA is, then return RemoteCertificateChainErrors on the sslPolicyErrors argument.


Code example of checking the CA's hash.

if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.None)
{
    var apiCertHash = new byte[] { 0x79, 0x04, 0x15, 0xC5, 0xC4, 0xF1, 0x6A, 0xA7, 0xC9, 0x12, 0xBB, 0x23, 0xED, 0x5A, 0x60, 0xA7, 0x92, 0xA8, 0xD5, 0x94 };
    if(chain.ChainElements.Count > 0)
    {
        //Not 100% if the root is first or last in the array. Don't have the program running to check.
        var certHash = chain.ChainElements[chain.ChainElements.Count - 1].Certificate.GetCertHash();
        if (certHash.Length == apiCertHash.Length)
        {
            for (var idx = 0; idx < certHash.Length; idx++)
            {
                if (certHash[idx] == apiCertHash[idx])
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes he can, on his machine only. That would not be a "Main In the Middle", the attacker controls a endpoint, there is not much you can do about that. You can put the fingerprint of the cert in, but a smarter idea would be put the fingerprint of the CA in and check that, that way you can issue new certificates (say you need to change the DNS name you are connecting to, you would need a new cert and therefor a new cert fingerprint). I will add some quick code to show how. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 15 '12 at 23:21
    
So Ssl is just to secure my client-server from MITM attack but not from controlling the EndPoint of my client ? –  Daniel Eugen Sep 15 '12 at 23:25
    
It is imposable to protect the endpoint. If the end user can run arbitrary code, you have lost. All a attacker has to do is attach his own debugger and they can do whatever they want with the running program. You can make it hard on them, but you can't stop it. The only way to "Stop it" is the end user must not be allowed to run anything they want. A example of this is a un-jailbroken iPhone, a user can only run apps from the app store, and the store has no debugging tools, so therefor the end user can not attack the program. But if jailbroken... you are where you started, can't stop it. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 15 '12 at 23:37
    
I am using the Root CA's Hash and you are using the server you are connecting to's hash. And yes, the thumbprint is part of the public cert that is submitted to the client as part of the negotion process, it is not secret. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 15 '12 at 23:41
1  
As long as the CA's hash never changes, yes. That's why when you "Self Sign" its better to self sign a CA then have that CA sign the certs going on the servers. Also please delete some of the older comments that are no longer relevant to keep this shorter, I have deleted mine. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 15 '12 at 23:57

If you are going to use your self-signed certificate, you need to use the code you presented otherwise it is enough to just use

private static bool OnCertificateValidation(
    object sender,
    X509Certificate certificate,
    X509Chain chain,
    SslPolicyErrors sslPolicyErrors)
{
    if (sslPolicyErrors == SslPolicyErrors.None)
    {
        return true;

    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer

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