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After all pointers are value types. It's what they are pointing to - is reference type. Is that correct or what?

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(at least in C), pointers have individual sizes based on type. Not sure how MicrosoftJava (C#) handles this but it sounds inefficient to store so much information with a pointer, even for microsoft. –  Gung Foo Sep 15 '12 at 23:19
    
@GungFoo actually only in very special cases are pointers different sizes from each other in C++; most pointers are the same size. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 15 '12 at 23:21
1  
@seth 1. i was talking about C. ;) 2. pointers are not guaranteed to be of the same size.. they may be of same size on platform1, but that doesn't say a thing about platform2. that is why you get a warning if you cast a void pointer to a pointer of different type. –  Gung Foo Sep 15 '12 at 23:26
1  
I expanded the title some; I believe this covers the desired intent better. (Also, do note this question is about C# ..) –  user166390 Sep 15 '12 at 23:35
    
@GungFoo Even more so in C which doesn't have member-to-function-pointers. Also pointers almost always the same size on the same platform, obviously I'm not saying they're the same size on all machines, 32 and 64 bit machines naturally have different size pointers. Also you don't get a warning in casting a void*, and even if you did, that wouldn't have anything to do with different platforms because once code is compiled, the sizes of the types are fixed. –  Seth Carnegie Sep 16 '12 at 4:50

3 Answers 3

In response to a comment by the OP here's an example of a local variable being turned into a class-level variable.

If I start with this code:

void Main()
{
    var x = 42;
    Func<int> f = () => x;
    var y = f();
}

The compiler turns it into this code:

void Main()
{
    var CS$<>8__locals2 = new <>c__DisplayClass1();
    CS$<>8__locals2.x = 42;
    Func<int> f = CS$<>8__locals2.<Main>b__0;
    var y = f();
}

And it creates the following <>c__DisplayClass1 class:

[CompilerGenerated]
private sealed class <>c__DisplayClass1
{
    public int x;

    public int <Main>b__0()
    {
        return this.x;
    }
}

I've done a little bit of clean up of the code for clarity.

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What about references? References are neither value types nor instances of reference types, but they are values. They've got to be stored somewhere. Do they go on the stack or the heap? Why does no one ever talk about them? Just because they don't have a type in the C# type system is no reason to ignore them.

The way in the past I've usually pushed back on this myth is to say that the real statement should be "in the Microsoft implementation of C# on the desktop CLR, value types are stored on the stack when the value is a local variable or temporary that is not a closed-over local variable of a lambda or anonymous method, and the method body is not an iterator block, and the jitter chooses to not enregister the value."

Got the answer for a blog. Here's the link - Eric Lippert's Blog

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1  
This reply confused me .. perhaps more carefully chosen excerpts from, or a summary of, the [good] article by Eric would clear things up. Also, use > to quote (and therefor attribute) excerpts better. –  user166390 Sep 15 '12 at 23:57
    
Also, while the article is a good read, this question is asking explicitly about Reference Types, so bringing in Value Types just muddles things up as Value Types are sometimes "lifted", but sometimes not .. which is different from Reference Types (which are being asked about). –  user166390 Sep 15 '12 at 23:59

Yes this is correct. All local variables are stored on the stack, no matter what type they are(value type or reference type). When you create a variable of reference type it is saved on stack, when you instantiate an object and assign it to that variable some memory will be allocated on heap which will be referenced by the variable stored on the stack.

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Not all local variables are stored on the stack. Local variables captured by a closure are created as class-level variables in an closure class. –  Enigmativity Sep 16 '12 at 2:11
    
@Enigmativity - Elaborate please! –  MontyPython Sep 16 '12 at 8:44
    
@MontyPython - I added an example as an answer - stackoverflow.com/a/12451933/259769. –  Enigmativity Sep 17 '12 at 1:22

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