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I would like to listen to a click event on a particular element and then dispatch it to a link element while keeping in mind if the meta key was hold or not.

For instance : Let's say I have a table of elements. When the user clicks on a row I would like to follow a link, but I would like the link to be opened in a new tab if the user had his /ctrl key pressed.

It seems simple but I found out this was tricky... (As I didn't succeed to do it!)

Thanks in advance for you help!

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3 Answers 3

Try this:

$(elm).click(
   function (event) {
      if (event.ctrlKey == 1) {
         window.open(link);
      }
      else {
         window.location = link;
      }
   }
);
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This work but this is a workaround. I want the browser to handle the modifiers. For instance on MacOs the keystroke for a new tab is meta and not ctrl. –  Nima Izadi Sep 16 '12 at 15:44
    
Downvote: JavaScript ≠ jQuery. If the OP did not specify any library, at least first ask in the comment if jQuery solutions are of any use. –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 16:23

Check this JSBin.

$("css_selector").click(function(e) 
{  
    if (e.ctrlKey) window.open(url);
    else           window.location = url;
});
share|improve this answer
    
This work but this is a workaround. I want the browser to handle the modifiers. For instance on MacOs the keystroke for a new tab is meta and not ctrl. –  Nima Izadi Sep 16 '12 at 15:45
    
Downvote: JavaScript ≠ jQuery. If the OP did not specify any library, at least first ask in the comment if jQuery solutions are of any use. –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 16:23
    
jQUery is just a framework. I don't see the problem. You can do exactly the same with plain javascript, it's just that the code is more readable with a jQuery. –  Kryz Sep 16 '12 at 18:00
    
The problem is that you're asking the OP to add a large dependency to its code in order to have a usable answer. –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 19:04
    
Ok, thanks for the explanation. I will take it into consideration next time. Thanks. –  Kryz Sep 17 '12 at 16:58

The DOM Event API already provides all you need, assuming you need only to remember the modifier keys from a legitimate user action.

When using addEventListener to catch an event, simply take the parameter, which is a DOMEvent instance, that is passed to your handler function, and resend it to your target element with dispatchEvent  :)

Indeed, a DOMEvent instance encapsulates its source environment. More specifically here, a MouseEvent knows which keys were pressed when it was fired.


Demo: try clicking the link in this JSfiddle while holding down (or ctrl if not on a Mac), for example.

For a complete reference, here is the used code:

var button = document.getElementById('source'),
    target = document.getElementById('target');

function handler(evt) {
    target.dispatchEvent(evt); // that's all the magic it takes
}

button.addEventListener(
    'click', // listen to a click event
    handler,
    false // no capture, i.e. do not catch events before children
);​

You may also find this complete reference on DOM events useful  :)

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I've already tried that but don't you get this error: Uncaught Error: DISPATCH_REQUEST_ERR: DOM Events Exception 1? –  Nima Izadi Sep 16 '12 at 18:23
    
@NimaIzadi I had tested only with Safari 5, in which it worked. Indeed, Chrome 21 throws a DISPATCH_REQUEST_ERR… and FF 14 throws NS_ERROR_ILLEGAL_VALUE. Quite interesting. I'm trying to investigate some more. –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 19:10
    
Doesn't work in Safari 6 neither. I also get a DISPATCH_REQUEST_ERR... –  Nima Izadi Sep 16 '12 at 19:24
1  
DISPATCH_REQUEST_ERR comes from the fact that the event is already dispatched. I tried to stopPropagation() but that doesn't change anything. Hence, I think only of two ways. First is to clone the event through createEvent and initMouseEvent (annoying to write, but can be in a helper function); this will probably not open links in the background as asked, due to the isTrusted attribute… –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 19:29
1  
…(ref. for isTrusted here). This should be tested in each browser though. Second way, to be tested too, and a bit ugly: add a timeout and dispatch the event later, after it has finished bubbling. –  MattiSG Sep 16 '12 at 19:30

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