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.greenbutton {
    font-family:"Helvetica";
       font-size:28px;
       font-weight:normal;
       line-height:130%;
       color:rgb(255,255,255);
       font-weight:300;
       height:100%;
       text-decoration:none;
       padding-left:40px;
       padding-right:40px;
       padding-top:3px;
       padding-bottom:3px;
       text-align: center;
       margin-top:25px;
       border-top-width:1px;
       border-top-color:#999999;
       border-top-style:solid;
       background-image: -webkit-gradient(
             linear,
             left bottom,
             left top,
             color-stop(0%, rgba(6,171,151,1)),
             color-stop(60%, rgba(6,171,151,1)),
             color-stop(61%, rgba(120,212,205,1)),
              color-stop(100%, rgba(120,212,205,1))
            );
       -webkit-border-radius:15px ;

}
.greenbuttonholder{
           width:140px;
           height:50px;
           padding-top:25px;
           position:relative;
           margin:auto;

}

This button only works in Google Chrome but not in Firefox.

By the way for those who want to do some experimenting here is the jsfiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/M5Bzn/

The only thing I've tried is adding -moz- to all the lines but that obviously didn't work :P

share|improve this question
    
You just need to design one yourself with a cross-browser tool. ColorZilla's Gradient Editor might work. There's others. – Jared Farrish Sep 16 '12 at 2:55
    
Is there another way? I mean I already coded the button and I don't to have to redo the button all the over again. – mwong Sep 16 '12 at 3:02
    
You don't target browsers, you target standards, and in your CSS you only coded for Chrome. Learn how to properly use vendor prefixes. – Rob Sep 16 '12 at 4:15

If you want to specifically target Mozilla, You can add this to your css:

   border-radius: 15px;
   background: -moz-linear-gradient(
         top,
         rgba(120,212,205,1),
         rgba(120,212,205,1) 40%,
         rgba(6,171,151,1) 41%,
         rgba(6,171,151,1)
        );

You can read more about linear-gradient at the developer docs

Note: Also, for border-radius, according to Mozilla's Documentation, "Support for the prefixed version (-moz-border-radius) was removed in Gecko 13.0 (Firefox 13.0 / Thunderbird 13.0 / SeaMonkey 2.10).". You can easily add -moz-border-radius if you want to support older versions of firefox

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to specifically target it but I want it to be cross browser as much as possible. – mwong Sep 16 '12 at 3:31
    
In that case, like @Rob said, you should not be coding for a browser, but for standards. No offense, but I recommend you stop, read up on cross-browser CSS, and then start over. – cegfault Sep 16 '12 at 4:42

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