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I'd really appreciate some help with the following questions:

Have captured, then rectified, grayscale images from a calibrated stereo rig. Am now attempting to get real world x,y, z coords , relative to the left camera, of specific points, in the left image; I am trying to use cvPerspectiveTransform to do so.

My abbreviated code is below.

The code appears to work to some extent, and returns the following 4 data points: (15.4510, -474.7451, -527.0327, -912.6536), which I understand to represent x,y,z and w.

Question 1) is this assumption correct? - it may be that division by w has already taken place and that XYZ have already been returned, in which case -912.6536 is an artefact to be ignored - any views on this are welcome.

Question 2) However if ,to achieve realworld coordinates X,Y,Z, each of 'x','y','z' respectively is to be divided by 'w', in what units are the resulting XYZ coordinates? I understand them to be related to the "points" used in calibration - in this case chessboard corners were 2.5 cm apart, however the distance from the camera of the object in this case was approximately 60cm... as you can see the math doesn't quite work.

I have diligently read the relevant pages in the Bradski book (and searched online), but I must be missing something.

Matrix<float> inputMatLeft = new Matrix<float>(4,1,3);
inputMatLeft[0,0] = xL; // xL, a float, the x coord of a point in the left image
inputMatLeft[1,0] = yL; // yL, a float, the y coord of same point in left image
inputMatLeft[2,0] = d;  // d, a float, the disparity between the same featurepoint in the left and right rectified images,  is calc'd and defined elsewhere
inputMatLeft[3,0] = 1F;

Matrix<float> rwCoords = new Matrix<float>(4,1,3);
rwCoords = computeRealWorldCoords(inputMatLeft);

// ....do stuff with rwCoords

public Matrix<float> computeRealWorldCoords(Matrix <float> leftSrc)
{
Matrix<float> leftDest = new Matrix<float>(4,1,3);
CvInvoke.cvPerspectiveTransform(leftSrc, leftDest, inputMatrixQ); // Q Matrix is 4x4 float
return leftDest;
}

Thanks!

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