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I'm trying to optimize a query which is taking a long time. The goal of the query is to get best similar F2 .(Specially similarity measure) This is an example of what I have:

 CREATE TABLE Test
(
   F1 varchar(124),
   F2 varchar(124),
   F3 varchar(124)
)
INSERT INTO TEST ( F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'A', 'B', 'C' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'D', 'B', 'E' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'F', 'I', 'G' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'F', 'I', 'G' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'D', 'B', 'C' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'F', 'B', 'G' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'D', 'I', 'C' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'A', 'B', 'C' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'A', 'B', 'K' )
INSERT INTO TEST (  F1, F2, F3 ) VALUES ( 'A', 'K', 'K' )

Now if I run this query:

SELECT B.f2,COUNT(*) AS CNT  
FROM 
(
select F1,F3 from Test
where F2='B'
 )AS A
    INNER JOIN  Test AS B
   ON A.F1 = B.F1 AND  A.F3 = B.F3
GROUP BY B.F2 
ORDER BY CNT DESC 

The table has 1m+ rows. What would be a better way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
What indexes do you have for this table? –  j.w.r Sep 16 '12 at 4:40
    
I have trouble understanding the goal of the query, can you also explain in it? –  ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ Sep 16 '12 at 4:42
    
NONCLUSTERED INDEX include F1,F2,F3 –  jozi Sep 16 '12 at 4:42
    
goal of the query get best similar F2 .(Specially similarity measure ) –  jozi Sep 16 '12 at 4:48
    
Do you mean "spatial similarity measure"? –  Fred Sobotka Sep 16 '12 at 6:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A filtered search for all rows WHERE F2 = 'B' will incur a full table scan unless you create an index that has F2 as its first or only column. Further down, the join condition involves columns F1 and F3, which you mention are already part of an index that begins with F1.

I also notice that the first part of the your query doesn't eliminate duplicates for the set of (T1, T3) where T2 = 'B', as one might expect when intersecting that set right back against another subset of the same table. You may have a reason for doing this, but we can't know for sure until you provide some details about the similarity measurement algorithm you're trying to implement.

Your ORDER BY clause is also affecting the query run time by incurring a potentially large, internal sort on the final result set.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the ✓, but I'm still interested in the algorithm you're using on your data. If you have a moment to lay out the steps in detail, we could help you develop a more efficient and direct query. –  Fred Sobotka Sep 16 '12 at 20:59

You can write your query in this form too, and because you have one select so your retrieve time will be reduced

SELECT  Test_1.F2, COUNT(Test_1.F1) AS Cnt 
FROM    Test 
INNER JOIN Test AS Test_1 ON Test.F1 = Test_1.F1 AND Test.F3 = Test_1.F3 
WHERE   (Test.F2 = 'B') 
GROUP BY Test_1.F2
share|improve this answer
    
Your query in real table taking a long time equal my query.6 sec. –  jozi Sep 16 '12 at 5:21
    
Rewriting a query to use one SELECT instead of two will not guarantee it will finish sooner. If you want to know how a specific change to a SQL query will impact its estimated cost, the reports produced by the query explain utility will show you which parts of the query are expensive (and why). –  Fred Sobotka Sep 16 '12 at 6:49

Here is another way to write your query. Close to guido's answer runnable in MS SQL.

WITH Filtered AS (SELECT DISTINCT F1,F3 FROM Test WHERE F2='B')
SELECT B.f2,COUNT(*) AS CNT
  FROM Test B
       INNER JOIN Filtered
           ON B.F1 = Filtered.F1 AND B.F3 = Filtered.F3
 GROUP BY B.F2
 ORDER BY CNT DESC

I think your original query might have a bug, like Fred mentioned. The count of F2="B" should be 6, not 8, in your example, is that right? If 8 is intended, take out DISTINCT.

Another thing you might try is to make TEST table's clustered index to be (F2, F1, F3), and make another non-clustered index on (F1, F3).

Sample code is also available on SqlFiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
MY query have not a bug,The count of F2="B" should be 8 and DISTINCT is more and after remove that is equal my query in time . –  jozi Sep 16 '12 at 9:04

If your Test table has 1m+ rows, the joined temporary table on which you group would easily have hundreds of millions of rows.

This would work in mysql but not on sql-server afaik:

SELECT F2,COUNT(*)
FROM Test AS B 
WHERE (B.F1,B.F3) IN (
  SELECT F1,F3 FROM Test
  WHERE F2='B') 
GROUP BY F2
share|improve this answer
    
not work in sql server 2008 –  jozi Sep 16 '12 at 6:25
    
ok; btw i could not run your original query on sqlfiddle's sql-server as well, so i thought you were experimenting on mysql –  ᴳᵁᴵᴰᴼ Sep 16 '12 at 8:58

I realize this has already been answered, but I think this approach might be much faster, particularly if F1 and F3 have many duplicate values:

SELECT B.f2, sum(A.cnt) AS CNT  
FROM (select F1, F3, count(*) as cnt
      from Test
      where F2='B'
      group by f1, f3
     ) A INNER JOIN
     Test B
     ON A.F1 = B.F1 AND A.F3 = B.F3
GROUP BY B.F2 
ORDER BY CNT DESC

If F1 and F3 don't have very many combinations, then the first subquery should reduce to a few hundred or thousand rows. (Your sample data has a single capital letter, so the number of combinations would be 576 if all letters are used.) SQL Server will probably do a merge or hash join on the result, which should perform well.

You can also do this without the join and group by, using windows functions:

select t.f2, sum(nummatches) as cnt
from (select t.*,
             sum(isB) over (partition by f1, f3) as nummatches
      from (select t.*,
                   (case when F2 = 'B' then 1 else 0 end) as IsB
            from test
           ) t
     ) t
group by t.f2
order by 2 desc

The window functions often perform better because they work on smaller chunks of the data.

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