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In the Flex app, the metadata is loaded as xml which has very good functions for searching deep into the xml nodes. In the extjs version I have converted the xml data to json, keeping the deep hierarchical content, and am loading to an extjs Store using a json reader. I have not created a model, deeming this not necessary as the model does not add add any search functionality(?). I am looking at store.find, store.findBy which can use a function, store.findRecord etc, but these functions look very 'one-levelish'. I need to go to the 'Tabs' "node", find its child 'Tab' with 'Name' of 'Tab1', and find the value of its attribute 'Title' ... am using the description "node" but it is hierarchical json data. Am I missing store functionality that would do this, should I use the store's raw json data - does json have better search functionality, or shall I revert to brute-force javascript by looping through all the "nodes"? I was hoping to avoid looping and find a function of some kind. As always, tia

share|improve this question
    
Can you post an example of your json? –  Wilk Sep 17 '12 at 14:11
    
The json can really be any format as I create it as metadata to define the app itself. It is very hierarchical e.g. as above, a TabBar has multiple tabs with properties and each tab has grids with properties etc. I am wondering if I should format it to load into a TreeStore, which seems to have more capabilities to "get down into the depths"? –  Mic C Sep 18 '12 at 6:03
    
I think the problem isn't about the type of the store: maybe, you need model associations to manage nested json data. –  Wilk Sep 18 '12 at 11:23
    
I wondered about that, but models seem to be more part of a conventional 'load business data from backend, allow user to modify it, save out to backend' etc? Since this is metadata internal to app functionality I want an efficient way of grabbing the correct 'node when I need it. –  Mic C Sep 18 '12 at 16:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, what I understood from our comments is that you need a kinda storage to access your JSON data as quickly and easily as possible. JSON means JavaScript Object Notation, so it's an object!

Ok, I give you two examples. First of all, setup JSON data:

{
    "users": [{
        "user": {
            "id": 0 ,
            "name": "foo" ,
            "age": 22 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "bowcrafting" ,
                "skillLevel": 50 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }} , { 
        "user": {
            "id": 1 ,
            "name": "bar" ,
            "age": 71 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "fencing" ,
                "skillLevel": 32 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "swordsmanship" ,
                "skillLevel": 73 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }} , {
        "user": {
            "id": 2 ,
            "name": "foobar" ,
            "age": 132 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "tactics" ,
                "skillLevel": 90 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "carpentery" ,
                "skillLevel": 86 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "hiding" ,
                "skillLevel": 100 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 65, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }
    }]
}

And now here we got two ways to follow:

First way: we can imagine the above JSON saved into a file called nested-json.json and we read it with a simple store. Than, we can use findBy search to find what we need:

var jstore = Ext.create ('Ext.data.Store', {
    fields: ['id', 'name', 'age', 'skills'] ,

    proxy: {
        type: 'ajax' ,
        url: 'nested-json.json' ,
        reader: {
            type: 'json' ,
            root: 'users' ,
            record: 'user' ,
            idProperty: 'id'
        }
    } ,

    autoLoad: true
});

Ext.create ('Ext.button.Button', {
    text: 'Push me' ,
    renderTo: Ext.getBody () ,
    handler: function (btn) {
        var index = jstore.findBy (function (user, id) {
            // Here's the hint
            if (user.data.skills.skillLevel === 50) return id;
            else return -1;
        });

        if (index != -1) {
            // It will print 'foo' because it's the user
            // that has the skillLevel equal to 50
            console.log (jstore.getAt(index).get ('name'));
        }
    }
});

The other way is to imagine the above JSON as an object, read directly from a raw JSON data. At this point, just use it as a javascript object:

// Users model: required by JSON reader
Ext.define ('Users', {
    extend: 'Ext.data.Model' ,
    fields: ['id', 'name', 'age', 'skills']
});

// JSON reader
var jreader = Ext.create ('Ext.data.reader.Json', {
    model: 'Users' ,
    root: 'users' ,
    record: 'user' ,
    idProperty: 'id'
});

// Reads records directly from raw JSON
var users = jreader.readRecords ({
    "users": [{
        "user": {
            "id": 0 ,
            "name": "foo" ,
            "age": 22 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "bowcrafting" ,
                "skillLevel": 50 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }} , { 
        "user": {
            "id": 1 ,
            "name": "bar" ,
            "age": 71 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "fencing" ,
                "skillLevel": 32 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "swordsmanship" ,
                "skillLevel": 73 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }} , {
        "user": {
            "id": 2 ,
            "name": "foobar" ,
            "age": 132 ,
            "skills": [{
                "type": "tactics" ,
                "skillLevel": 90 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "carpentery" ,
                "skillLevel": 86 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 75, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            } , {
                "type": "hiding" ,
                "skillLevel": 100 ,
                "levels": [10, 25, 50, 65, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 99, 100]
            }]
        }
    }]
});

// Here's the magic
Ext.each (users.records, function (user) {
    console.log ('*** USER ***');
    console.log (user);

    console.log ('id: ' + user.get ('id'));
    console.log ('name: ' + user.get ('name'));
    console.log ('age: ' + user.get ('age'));

    Ext.each (user.get ('skills'), function (skill) {
        console.log ('*** SKILL ***');
        console.log (skill);

        console.log ('type: ' + skill.type);
        console.log ('level: ' + skill.skillLevel);

        console.log ('*** LEVELS ***');
        Ext.each (skill.levels, function (level) {
            console.log (level);
        });
    });
});

Here's a jsfiddle to test this last one: jsfiddle

I hope to have understood what you requested. If I didn't, please let me know with an example made by yourself ;)

share|improve this answer
    
excellent examples and explains everything - thank you very much! –  Mic C Sep 19 '12 at 4:18
    
ok :-) it is not immediately obvious to me how to flag my question as answered –  Mic C Sep 19 '12 at 4:49
    
@MicC Under the writing '1 Answer' there are two arrows and one number. If you have appreciated my answer, you can give me a bonus clicking the up arrow, otherwise if you didn't like it, just click the down arrow. Finally, click on the "V" button located under the down arrow to flag your question as answered, switching it from grey to green color ;) Both of us, will earn some points ;) –  Wilk Sep 19 '12 at 8:31
2  
apparently I need "15 reputation" to click the up arrow - I have to go kill a dragon and rescue a princess, right? :-) –  Mic C Sep 19 '12 at 16:08
    
15 or more? 'cuz you got 15 :P However, killing a dragon and rescuing a princess could help you! –  Wilk Sep 19 '12 at 16:19

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