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I have an std::deque<CustomType>, I am trying to remove a member whose location I do not know. Therefore, I am first finding it and then removing it.

/* 
  Remove from - members, which is the private variable of std::deque<User> type
*/
void Group::remove_member(User u) {  
    if(this->is_member(u)) {
           std::deque<User>::iterator iter;
           iter = std::find(this->members.begin(), this->members.end(), u);
           if(iter != this->members.end()) {
                this->members.erase(iter);
           }
     }
}

However, the compiler (GCC) is throwing an error which seems like missing Operator Overloading.

In file included from /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/algorithm:62,
from Group.cpp:4:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h: In function ‘_RandomAccessIterator std::__find(_RandomAccessIterator, _RandomAccessIterator, const _Tp&, std::random_access_iterator_tag) [with _RandomAccessIterator = std::_Deque_iterator<User, User&, User*>, _Tp = User]’:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:4224:   instantiated from ‘_IIter std::find(_IIter, _IIter, const _Tp&) [with _IIter = std::_Deque_iterator<User, User&, User*>, _Tp = User]’
Group.cpp:36:   instantiated from here
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:174: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:178: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:182: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:186: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:194: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:198: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.4.6/../../../../include/c++/4.4.6/bits/stl_algo.h:202: error: no match for ‘operator==’ in ‘__first.std::_Deque_iterator<_Tp, _Ref, _Ptr>::operator* [with _Tp = User, _Ref = User&, _Ptr = User*]() == __val’
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1  
I think std::deque allows deletion from the front or back only. Which is what deque is about. –  Vinayak Garg Sep 16 '12 at 6:24
1  
Can you post the definition of User? –  GWW Sep 16 '12 at 6:24
    
I have a feeling you have not declared bool User::operator==(const User&) –  oldrinb Sep 16 '12 at 6:25
    
@oldrinb I haven't! –  WeaklyTyped Sep 16 '12 at 6:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

See my comment.

I have a feeling you have not declared bool User::operator==(const User&)

The error is telling you that its attempting to do *iterator == ... inside the implementation of std::find. The problem, however, is that you have not overloaded operator== for User. Try declaring a member function inside User as follows...

bool operator==(const User&);

Now, define it to provide some meaningful semantic equality between Users, otherwise std::find doesn't know how to compare them.


As a side note, why doesn't Group::remove_member take const User& rather than User?

share|improve this answer
    
After reading your comment, I already started doing what you suggested. Let me see if it works. BTW, how will const User& make things better? (I'm relatively new to C++) –  WeaklyTyped Sep 16 '12 at 6:34
    
Passing by const reference avoids copying the object while simultaneously preventing the object from being used as a modifiable lvalue. –  oldrinb Sep 16 '12 at 6:38
    
Thanks! The error is resolved and also for the valuable advice. :) –  WeaklyTyped Sep 16 '12 at 7:31

Like @oldrinb mentioned, you need to tell explicitly how to test the equality of two User class. Otherwise the find algorithm won't be able to locate the item you look for. This is done by overriding the == operator.

#include <iostream>
#include <deque>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

class MyCustomClass{
  public:
    MyCustomClass(int id) : id_(id) { }

   // Would produce the same error without this
   bool operator==(const MyCustomClass& b){
     return id_ == b.id_;
   }

   int id(){ return id_; }

  private:
    int id_;
};

int main(void){
  deque<MyCustomClass> q;
  q.push_back(MyCustomClass(1));
  q.push_back(MyCustomClass(2));
  q.push_back(MyCustomClass(3));
  deque<MyCustomClass>::iterator it = 
    find(q.begin(), q.end(), MyCustomClass(2));

  if ( it != q.end() ){
    printf("Found\n");
    q.erase(it);
  }else{
    printf("Not Found!\n");
  }

  for(it = q.begin(); it != q.end() ; it++)
    printf("%d ", it->id());

  printf("\n");

  return 0;
}
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