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I'm writing my first python program and I'm running into something that seems strange.

My program looks like this:

def main():
  listOfThings = []
  for i in range(0,3):
    newThing = thing()
    newThing.listOfStrings.append('newString')
    listOfThings.append(newThing)

Thing simply looks like this:

class thing:
  listOfStrings = []

I'm expecting listOfThings to be:

listOfThings
 -thing1
  -newString
 -thing2
  -newString
 -thing3
  -newString

But instead i'm getting this:

listOfThings
 -thing1
  -newString
  -newString
  -newString
 -thing2
  -newString
  -newString
  -newString
 -thing3
  -newString
  -newString
  -newString

In other languages, this is what I would expect to see if thing.listOfStrings was static. Is there some subtlety of python that I'm missing here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

listOfStrings is a class attribute. All the instances will share the same list

Instead you should add the attribute during __init__

class thing:
    def __init__(self):
        self.listOfStrings = []
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So how do I create an object with it's own list? –  ConditionRacer Sep 16 '12 at 6:36
    
Same way you've been doing it, thing(). –  nneonneo Sep 16 '12 at 6:38
    
@Justin984, thing() just as you were doing. __init__ is called automatically when you create the instance –  gnibbler Sep 16 '12 at 6:40
    
This only works because list is a mutable type. If listOfThings was a str (immutable and therefore not modifiable in-place), the results would vary –  inspectorG4dget Sep 16 '12 at 6:40
    
That fixed it. Thanks a lot! So is this always the way to do instance variables vs class variables? –  ConditionRacer Sep 16 '12 at 6:43

In Python, any "variables" declared at class scope become class attributes, which are akin to static class members in other languages. They can be accessed either through the class name thing.listOfStrings or an instance newThing.listOfStrings, but they always refer to the same attribute.

If you want instance attributes, create them in an __init__ method:

class Thing:
    def __init__(self):
        self.listOfStrings = []

Every time you instantiate a new instance of Thing using Thing(), the __init__ will run in the new instance and give it its own listOfStrings list.

Note that due to Python's dynamic nature, __init__ is not the only place where instance attributes can be added (though it is the recommended location). For example, the following is legal:

class Foo:
    pass # empty class definition

a = Foo()
a.x = 42
print a.x # prints 42

b = Foo()
b.y = 99
print b.x # raises AttributeError
print b.y # prints 99
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