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I have the following table and rows defined in SQLFiddle

I need to select rows from products table where difference between two rows start_date and nvl(return_date,end_date) is 1. i.e. start_date of current row and nvl(return_date,end_date) of previous row should be one

For example

PRODUCT_NO TSH098 and PRODUCT_REG_NO FLDG, the END_DATE is August, 15 2012 and PRODUCT_NO TSH128 and PRODUCT_REG_NO FLDG start_date is August, 16 2012, so the difference is only of a day.

How can I get the desired output using sql.

Any help is highly appreciable.

Thanks

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1  
In your comments you have added extra requirements, regarding join and filtering conditions. You have wasted people's time by not including all the requirements in your initial question. Please make amends by rounding up all those editions and editing your question so it reflects your actual requirement. –  APC Sep 16 '12 at 13:11
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use lag analytical function to get access to a row at a given physical offset prior to the current position. According to your sorting order it might look like this(not so elegant though).

select *
  from products p
  join (select *
         from(select p.Product_no
                   , p.Product_Reg_No
                   , case 
                       when (lag(start_date, 1, start_date) over(order by product_reg_no)-
                            nvl(return_date, end_date)) = 1 
                            then lag(start_date, 1, start_date) 
                                   over(order by product_reg_no) 
                        end start_date
                   , End_Date
                   , Return_Date
               from products p 
              order by 2,1 desc
              )
        where start_date is not null
       ) s
    on (p.start_date = s.start_date or p.end_date = s.end_date)
 order by 2, 1 desc

SQL FIddle DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the solution. For PRODUCT_REG_NO='FLDG' there are PRODUCT_NO TSH098 and TSH12 having start_date and nvl(return_date, end_date) difference of one, but that is not selected. I would like to select all those records with dates difference of one. –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 10:31
    
I've made some changes –  Nicholas Krasnov Sep 16 '12 at 11:52
    
Nicholas Thanks a lot as this looks good and I am currently testing my results. I have one small doubt i.e. where to include my where condition like where PRODUCT_REG_NO='FLDG'? It should be after where start_date is not null or just above the last order by 2, 1 desc Regards –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 12:03
    
it may be just above last order if you want to filter final result –  Nicholas Krasnov Sep 16 '12 at 12:10
    
As I am testing the results, please check the following, I did not execute any results SQL Fiddle where as select * from products p has records Thanks –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 12:19
show 4 more comments

In SQL, date + X adds X days to the date. So you can:

select  * 
from    products
where   start_date + 1 = nvl(end_date, return_date)

If the dates could contain a time part, use trunc to remove the time part:

select  * 
from    products
where   trunc(start_date) + 1 = trunc(nvl(end_date, return_date))

Live example at SQL Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
What I am looking for is those rows where difference of start_date and nvl(return_date,end_date) is 1. i.e. start_date of current row and nvl(return_date,end_date) of previous row should be one e.g. PRODUCT_REG_NO FLDG with PRODUCT_NO TSH098 start_date and PRODUCT_NO TSH128 nvl(return_date,end_date) is one. I hope I explained properly. –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 8:35
2  
Aha, I missed the "previous row" part. Gotta go now, but have a look at the lag function –  Andomar Sep 16 '12 at 8:47
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I am under the impression you only want the matching dates differing by 1 day if the product reg no matches. So I simply joint it and I think this is what you want

select p1.product_reg_no,
       p1.product_no product_no_1,
       p2.product_no product_no_2,
       p1.start_date start_date_1,
       nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date) return_or_end_date_2
  from products p1
  join products p2 on (p1.product_reg_no = p2.product_reg_no)
where  p1.start_date-1 = nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date)

SQL Fiddle

If I was wrong with the grouping then just leave the join condition away which with the given example products table brings the same result

select p1.product_reg_no,
       p1.product_no product_no_1,
       p2.product_no product_no_2,
       p1.start_date start_date_1,
       nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date) return_or_end_date_2
  from products p1, products p2
where  p1.start_date-1 = nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date)

SQL Fiddle 2

Now you say the difference is 1 day. I automatically assumed that start_date is 1 day higher than the nvl(return_date,end_date). Also I assumed that the date is always midnight. But to have all that also excluded you can work with trunc and go in both directions:

select p1.product_reg_no,
       p1.product_no product_no_1,
       p2.product_no product_no_2,
       p1.start_date start_date_1,
       nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date) return_or_end_date_2
  from products p1, products p2
where  trunc(p1.start_date)-1 = trunc(nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date))
    or trunc(p1.start_date)+1 = trunc(nvl(p2.return_date,p2.end_date))

SQL Fiddle 3

And this all works because dates (not timestamp) can be calculated by adding and subtracting.

EDIT: Following your comment you want return_date or end_date to be compared and equal dates are also wanted:

select p1.product_reg_no,
       p1.product_no product_no_1,
       p2.product_no product_no_2,
       p1.start_date start_date_1,
       p2.return_date return_date_2,
       p2.end_date end_date_2
  from products p1, products p2
where  trunc(p1.start_date)   = trunc(p2.return_date)
    or trunc(p1.start_date)-1 = trunc(p2.return_date)
    or trunc(p1.start_date)+1 = trunc(p2.return_date)
    or trunc(p1.start_date)   = trunc(p2.end_date)
    or trunc(p1.start_date)-1 = trunc(p2.end_date)
    or trunc(p1.start_date)+1 = trunc(p2.end_date)

SQL Fiddle 4

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. One main problem I am facing is this. For PRODUCT_REG_NO='FLDG' there are PRODUCT_NO TSH098 and TSH12 having start_date and nvl(return_date, end_date) difference of one, but that is not selected. I would like to select all those records with dates difference of one. How can I do this? Regards –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 11:51
    
TSH098 has return_date 31-May-2012. TSH012 has start_date 18-Jun-2012. So the condition does not match. NVL does say take the first value but if it is null take the second value. But I think I am guessing what you want let me add one more. –  hol Sep 16 '12 at 11:56
    
@Polppan Please see my edit. By the way. Do you need the matches only within a PRODUCT_REG_NO or over the whole table? –  hol Sep 16 '12 at 12:02
    
Hol Match should be within PRODUCT_REG_NO. –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 12:04
    
@Polppan "TSH098 and TSH12 having start_date and nvl(return_date, end_date) difference of one" They don't have difference of 1. TSH098 start_date and TSH012 (there is no TSH12) end_date have difference of 0. Could you elaborate why you think they should be selected? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 16 '12 at 14:20
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The way to compare the current row with the previous row is to user the LAG() function. Something like this:

select * from 
(
select p.* 
       , lag (end_date) over 
         (order by start_date )
         as prev_end_date
       , lag (return_date) over 
         (order by start_date )
         as prev_return_date
from products p
)
where (trunc(start_date) - 1) = trunc(nvl(prev_return_date, prev_end_date))
order by 2,1 desc

However, this will not return the results you desire, because you have not defined a mechanism for defining a sort order. And without a sort order the concept of "previous row" is meaningless.

However, what you can do is this:

select p1.* 
       , p2.*
from products p1 cross join products p2
where (trunc(p2.start_date) - 1) = trunc(nvl(p1.return_date, p1.end_date))
order by 2, 1 desc

This SQL queries your table twice, filtering on the basis of dates. The each row in the result set contains a record from each table. If a given start_date matches more than one end_date or vice versa you will get records for multiple hits.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure why are you performing a CROSS JOIN? Outer rows have no clue there imo. Wouldn't be enough to do INNER JOIN like: FROM p1 JOIN p2 ON (trunc(p2.start_date) - 1) = trunc(nvl(p1.return_date, p1.end_date))? –  WojtusJ Sep 16 '12 at 11:03
    
@WojtusJ - both solutions return the same result. I prefer the CROSS JOIN because it conveys the intent better; to my mind INNER JOIN implies a key-ed relationship. But your taste or interpretation may vary. –  APC Sep 16 '12 at 13:07
    
I see, it actually makes sense. :-) –  WojtusJ Sep 16 '12 at 13:14
    
@WojtusJ - perhaps the WITH clauses confused the issue: they were relics of an earlier attempt to solve it, and I should have refactored them out completely (which I have now done). –  APC Sep 16 '12 at 13:20
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You mean like this?

SELECT T2.*
FROM PRODUCTS T1
    JOIN PRODUCTS T2 ON (
        nvl(T1.end_date, T1.return_date) + 1 = T2.start_date
    );

In your SQL Fiddle example, it returns:

PRODUCT_NO    PRODUCT_REG_NO    START_DATE                          END_DATE                            RETURN_DATE
TSH128        FLDG              August, 16 2012 00:00:00-0400       September, 15 2012 00:00:00-0400    (null)
TSH125        SCRW              August, 08 2012 00:00:00-0400       September, 07 2012 00:00:00-0400    (null)
TSH137        SCRW              September, 08 2012 00:00:00-0400    October, 07 2012 00:00:00-0400      (null)
  • TSH128 is returned for the reasons you already explained.
  • TSH125 is returned because TSH116 end_date is August, 07 2012.
  • TSH137 is returned because TSH125 end_date is September, 07 2012.

If you want to compare only rows within the same product_reg_no, it's easy to add that to the JOIN condition. If you want both "directions" of the 1-day difference, it's easy to add that too.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to have only those rows with start date of current row and previous row difference being one matching PRODUCT_REG_NO. Thanks –  Polppan Sep 16 '12 at 14:23
    
@Polppan Fine, just add that to the JOIN condition, as I already mentioned. BTW, the word "previous" has a meaning only in the context of an ordering. What is your ordering? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Sep 16 '12 at 16:19
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