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I'd like to optimize my queries so I look into mysql-slow.log.

Most of my slow queries contains ORDER BY RAND(). I cannot find a real solution to resolve this problem. Theres is a possible solution at MySQLPerformanceBlog but I don't think this is enough. On poorly optimized (or frequently updated, user managed) tables it doesn't work or I need to run two or more queries before I can select my PHP-generated random row.

Is there any solution for this issue?

Thanks!

A dummy example:

SELECT  accomodation.ac_id,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_name,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_images
FROM    accomodation, accomodation_category
WHERE   accomodation.ac_status != 'draft'
        AND accomodation.ac_category = accomodation_category.acat_id
        AND accomodation_category.acat_slug != 'vendeglatohely'
        AND ac_images != 'b:0;'
ORDER BY
        RAND()
LIMIT 1
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Try this:

SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  @cnt := COUNT(*) + 1,
                @lim := 10
        FROM    t_random
        ) vars
STRAIGHT_JOIN
        (
        SELECT  r.*,
                @lim := @lim - 1
        FROM    t_random r
        WHERE   (@cnt := @cnt - 1)
                AND RAND(20090301) < @lim / @cnt
        ) i

This is especially efficient on MyISAM (since the COUNT(*) is instant), but even in InnoDB it's 10 times more efficient than ORDER BY RAND().

The main idea here is that we don't sort, but instead keep two variables and calculate the running probability of a row to be selected on the current step.

See this article in my blog for more detail:

Update:

If you need to select but a single random record, try this:

SELECT  aco.*
FROM    (
        SELECT  minid + FLOOR((maxid - minid) * RAND()) AS randid
        FROM    (
                SELECT  MAX(ac_id) AS maxid, MIN(ac_id) AS minid
                FROM    accomodation
                ) q
        ) q2
JOIN    accomodation aco
ON      aco.ac_id =
        COALESCE
        (
        (
        SELECT  accomodation.ac_id
        FROM    accomodation
        WHERE   ac_id > randid
                AND ac_status != 'draft'
                AND ac_images != 'b:0;'
                AND NOT EXISTS
                (
                SELECT  NULL
                FROM    accomodation_category
                WHERE   acat_id = ac_category
                        AND acat_slug = 'vendeglatohely'
                )
        ORDER BY
                ac_id
        LIMIT   1
        ),
        (
        SELECT  accomodation.ac_id
        FROM    accomodation
        WHERE   ac_status != 'draft'
                AND ac_images != 'b:0;'
                AND NOT EXISTS
                (
                SELECT  NULL
                FROM    accomodation_category
                WHERE   acat_id = ac_category
                        AND acat_slug = 'vendeglatohely'
                )
        ORDER BY
                ac_id
        LIMIT   1
        )
        )

This assumes your ac_id's are distributed more or less evenly.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, Quassnoi! First of all, thanks for your fast response! Maybe it's my fault but it's still unclear your solution. I'll update my original post with a concrete example and I'll be happy if you explain your solution on this example. –  fabrik Aug 7 '09 at 13:16
    
there was a typo at "JOIN accomodation aco ON aco.id =" where aco.id really is aco.ac_id. on the other hand the corrected query didn't worked for me because it throws an error #1241 - Operand should contain 1 column(s) at the fifth SELECT (the fourth sub-select). I tried to find the problem with parenthesis (if i'm not wrong) but i cannot find the problem yet. –  fabrik Aug 10 '09 at 12:11
    
@fabrik : try now. It would be really helpful if you posted the table scripts so that I could check them before posting. –  Quassnoi Aug 10 '09 at 12:14
    
Thanks, it works! :) Can you edit the JOIN ... ON aco.id part to JOIN ... ON aco.ac_id so i can accept your solution. Thanks again! A question: i wonder if possible this is a worse random like ORDER BY RAND()? Just because this query repeating some result(s) a lot of times. –  fabrik Aug 10 '09 at 12:24
1  
@Adam: no, that's intentional, so that you can reproduce the results. –  Quassnoi Dec 5 '11 at 16:25

It depends on how random you need to be. The solution you linked works pretty well IMO. Unless you have large gaps in the ID field, it's still pretty random.

However, you should be able to do it in one query using this (for selecting a single value):

SELECT [fields] FROM [table] WHERE id >= FLOOR(RAND()*MAX(id)) LIMIT 1

Other solutions:

  • Add a permanent float field called random to the table and fill it with random numbers. You can then generate a random number in PHP and do "SELECT ... WHERE rnd > $random"
  • Grab the entire list of IDs and cache them in a text file. Read the file and pick a random ID from it.
  • Cache the results of the query as HTML and keep it for a few hours.
share|improve this answer
4  
Is it just me or this query doesn't work? I tried it with several variations and they all throw "Invalid use of group function".. –  Felipe Schenone Mar 15 '12 at 3:48
    
You can do it with a subquery SELECT [fields] FROM [table] WHERE id >= FLOOR(RAND()*(SELECT MAX(id) FROM [table])) LIMIT 1 but this doesn't seem to work properly since it never returns the last record –  Mark Feb 23 '13 at 22:56
2  
SELECT [fields] FROM [table] WHERE id >= FLOOR(1 + RAND()*(SELECT MAX(id) FROM [table])) LIMIT 1 Seems to be doing the trick for me –  Mark Feb 23 '13 at 23:07

Here's how I'd do it:

SET @r := (SELECT ROUND(RAND() * (SELECT COUNT(*)
  FROM    accomodation a
  JOIN    accomodation_category c
    ON (a.ac_category = c.acat_id)
  WHERE   a.ac_status != 'draft'
        AND c.acat_slug != 'vendeglatohely'
        AND a.ac_images != 'b:0;';

SET @sql := CONCAT('
  SELECT  a.ac_id,
        a.ac_status,
        a.ac_name,
        a.ac_status,
        a.ac_images
  FROM    accomodation a
  JOIN    accomodation_category c
    ON (a.ac_category = c.acat_id)
  WHERE   a.ac_status != ''draft''
        AND c.acat_slug != ''vendeglatohely''
        AND a.ac_images != ''b:0;''
  LIMIT ', @r, ', 1');

PREPARE stmt1 FROM @sql;

EXECUTE stmt1;
share|improve this answer
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/211329/… –  Bill Karwin Aug 7 '09 at 21:01
    
my table isn't continuous because it's often edited. for example currently the first id is 121. –  fabrik Aug 10 '09 at 12:27
2  
The technique above does not rely on the id values being continuous. It chooses a random number between 1 and COUNT(*), not 1 and MAX(id) like some other solutions. –  Bill Karwin Aug 10 '09 at 17:23

Dare I ask if the query is actually leveraging indexes? I am not sure how efficient the MySQL RAND method is, but some versions of MySQL are quite fond of generating large result sets on disk and then picking the first one. If you could keep your query isolated to an index, you might have exponentially faster performance. (depending on the index size, performance of RAND, ...)

Can you post an explain plan for the query?

Jacob

share|improve this answer
    
an explain for my query in the first post? –  fabrik Aug 10 '09 at 12:29
    
You can't index RAND(). That's just silly. –  rjmunro Jan 24 '12 at 12:03
1  
I was not attempting to create an index for rand. That would indeed be silly. I was guessing, perhaps very incorrectly, that the result set would not be very large compared to the overall number of rows. If the filtering is indexed well and gets you to a small set of results, you can pick one of them, retrieve any other needed fields, and return it. My question would only have helped with the efficiency of the filtering and pulling together the temporary result from which one entry could be randomly picked. –  TheJacobTaylor Feb 7 '12 at 5:49

This will give you single sub query that will use the index to get a random id then the other query will fire getting your joined table.

SELECT  accomodation.ac_id,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_name,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_images
FROM    accomodation, accomodation_category
WHERE   accomodation.ac_status != 'draft'
        AND accomodation.ac_category = accomodation_category.acat_id
        AND accomodation_category.acat_slug != 'vendeglatohely'
        AND ac_images != 'b:0;'
AND accomodation.ac_id IS IN (
        SELECT accomodation.ac_id FROM accomodation ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 1
)
share|improve this answer

The solution for your dummy-example would be:

SELECT  accomodation.ac_id,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_name,
        accomodation.ac_status,
        accomodation.ac_images
FROM    accomodation,
        JOIN 
            accomodation_category 
            ON accomodation.ac_category = accomodation_category.acat_id
        JOIN 
            ( 
               SELECT CEIL(RAND()*(SELECT MAX(ac_id) FROM accomodation)) AS ac_id
            ) AS Choices 
            USING (ac_id)
WHERE   accomodation.ac_id >= Choices.ac_id 
        AND accomodation.ac_status != 'draft'
        AND accomodation_category.acat_slug != 'vendeglatohely'
        AND ac_images != 'b:0;'
LIMIT 1

To read more about alternatives to ORDER BY RAND(), you should read this article.

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