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When I try to pass text which spreads throughout a few block elements the window.find method dosent work:

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
</head>
<body>
  <p>search me</p><b> I could be the answer</b>
</body>
</html>

JavaScript:

window.find("meI could be");

Or:

str = "me";
str+= "\n";
str+="I could be t";

window.find(str);

This happens when the <p> element is present between the search term.
The end result should be a GUI selection on the text in the page, I do not want to search if it exists.

I would like to know how to achieve this in Firefox(at least) and internet explorer.
Note: I can't change the dom (e.g. change to display inline).

Edit:
Here is something I tried after @Alexey Lebedev's comment, but it also finds the script (tag [...] text):

Can I make it more simple? (better)?

function nativeTreeWalker(startNode) {
    var walker = document.createTreeWalker(
        startNode, 
        NodeFilter.SHOW_TEXT, 
        null, 
        false
    );
    var node;
    var textNodesV = [];
    var textNodes = [];
    node = walker.nextNode();

    while(node ) {
      if(node.nodeValue.trim()){
        textNodes.push(node);
        textNodesV.push(node.nodeValue);
        //console.log(node.nodeValue);
      }
        node = walker.nextNode();
    }
  return [textNodes,textNodesV];
}

var result = nativeTreeWalker(document.body);
var textNodes = result[0];
var textNodesV = result[1];

var param = " Praragraph.Test 3 Praragr";
paramArr = param.split(/(?=[\S])(?!\s)(?=[\W])(?=[\S])/g);
//Fix split PARAM
for(i=0;i<paramArr.length-1;i++){
  paramArr[i]= paramArr[i]+paramArr[i+1].charAt(0);
  paramArr[i+1] = paramArr[i+1].substring(1,paramArr[i+1].length);
}
//Fix last element PARAM
if(paramArr[paramArr.length-1] === ""){
  paramArr.splice(paramArr.length-1,1);
}
//console.log(paramArr);
var startNode,startOffset,sFound=false,
    endNode,endOffset;
for(i=0;i<paramArr.length;i++){
  for(j=0;j<textNodesV.length;j++){
    //Fully Equal
    var pos = textNodesV[j].indexOf(paramArr[i]);
    if(pos != -1){
      if(!sFound){
        startNode = textNodes[j];
        startOffset = pos;
        sFound=true;
      }else{
        endNode = textNodes[j];
        endOffset = pos+paramArr[i].length;
        break;
      }
    }
  }
}
console.log(startNode);
console.log(startOffset);
console.log(endNode);
console.log(endOffset);

var range = document.createRange();
range.setStart(startNode,startOffset);
range.setEnd(endNode,endOffset);
var sel = window.getSelection();
sel.removeAllRanges();
sel.addRange(range);

Note: No jQuery (only Raw JS).

share|improve this question
2  
If you can't change the DOM you'll need to use something else than window.find(). Select all text nodes, find the text using regexp, and highlight it using selection ranges. –  Alexey Lebedev Sep 16 '12 at 9:08
    
@AlexeyLebedev, I've added some code. –  funerr Sep 18 '12 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

JS Bin demo: http://jsbin.com/aqiciv/1/

If you want this to work in IE < 9 you'll need to add MS-specific selection code (nightmare), or use Rangy.js (pretty heavy).

function visibleTextNodes() {
    var walker = document.createTreeWalker(
        document.body,
        NodeFilter.SHOW_ALL,
        function(node) {
            if (node.nodeType == 3) {
                return NodeFilter.FILTER_ACCEPT;
            } else if (node.offsetWidth && node.offsetHeight && node.style.visibility != 'hidden') {
                return NodeFilter.FILTER_SKIP;
            } else {
                return NodeFilter.FILTER_REJECT;
            }
        },
        false
    );

    for (var nodes = []; walker.nextNode();) {
        nodes.push(walker.currentNode);
    }
    return nodes;
}

// Find the first match, select and scroll to it.
// Case- and whitespace- insensitive.
// For better scrolling to selection see https://gist.github.com/3744577
function highlight(needle) {
    needle = needle.replace(/\s/g, '').toLowerCase();

    var textNodes = visibleTextNodes();

    for (var i = 0, texts = []; i < textNodes.length; i++) {
        texts.push(textNodes[i].nodeValue.replace(/\s/g, '').toLowerCase());
    }

    var matchStart = texts.join('').indexOf(needle);
    if (matchStart < 0) {
        return false;
    }

    var nodeAndOffsetAtPosition = function(position) {
        for (var i = 0, consumed = 0; consumed + texts[i].length < position; i++) {
            consumed += texts[i].length;
        }
        var whitespacePrefix = textNodes[i].nodeValue.match(/^\s*/)[0];
        return [textNodes[i], position - consumed + whitespacePrefix.length];
    };

    var range = document.createRange();
    range.setStart.apply(range, nodeAndOffsetAtPosition(matchStart));
    range.setEnd.apply(  range, nodeAndOffsetAtPosition(matchStart + needle.length));
    window.getSelection().removeAllRanges();
    window.getSelection().addRange(range);
    range.startContainer.parentNode.scrollIntoView();
}

highlight('hello world');
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the late notice but I would prefer a "raw" js version... (that's why my version is only js). –  funerr Sep 18 '12 at 18:57
    
@agam360, jQuery text node retrieval was buggy, nested nodes could be returned in a different order than they appear in the document. I removed jQuery dependency and used tree walker instead, it works correctly with nested nodes. –  Alexey Lebedev Sep 18 '12 at 19:50
    
Can You tell me about any problems you see in the code I supplied? –  funerr Sep 18 '12 at 20:47
    
@agam360: I do not fully understand how it works, especially the paramArr, but there are several things: 1. Script tags, obviously. 2. DOM exception if you're looking for a single word 3. Case- and whitespace- sensitive. 4. Unlike window.find() doesn't scroll to selection. 5. Doesn't require the terms to be adjacent, or to be in the document at all. For example "hello.world" will match the entire document if it starts with "hello." and ends with "word". And "one.two.three" will match "one.anything.three". –  Alexey Lebedev Sep 18 '12 at 21:07
    
Thanks I like your solution! –  funerr Sep 19 '12 at 20:27

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