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player.fire is a boolean value that turns true if the spacebar is in keydown. Everything works as it should.

The problem I have is controlling the array asteroids.firing.push interval. Right now, it adds a few instances, even when I tap lightly on the spacebar. I am using requestAnimationFrame.

How do I control the push interval?

    if(player.fire){
        var angle = thisShip.rot, 
        hyp = 10; //speed

        var vX = Math.cos(angle) * hyp, 
        vY = Math.sin(angle) * hyp;

        asteroids.firing.push(new asteroids.model.fire(thisShip.x, thisShip.y, vX, vY));
    }

I have tried something like this, but it doesn't slow down the push interval, rather it just creates a pulsing effect, regenerating the firing sequence again and again.

    ...
    if(player.fire){
            fireInterval(thisShip);
    }

    function fireInterval(thisShip){
        var angle = thisShip.rot, 
            hyp = 10; //speed

        var vX = Math.cos(angle) * hyp, 
        vY = Math.sin(angle) * hyp;

        asteroids.firing.push(new asteroids.model.fire(thisShip.x, thisShip.y, vX, vY));

        setTimeout(function(){
            fireInterval(thisShip);
        }, 500);
    } 
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You need to post more code, as it is not clear how the code you have posted is invoked. –  lanzz Sep 16 '12 at 9:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What's happening is you're calling this function every update. I don't know what your engine is like, but that might be up to 60fps if you're using requestAnimationFrame, or more if you're just looping as quickly as possible, and updates aren't tied to drawing.

What you need to do is put some sort of state on the ship's gun. It doesn't matter what it is...

thisShip.cooldownTime = 250; //ms
thisShip.lastFired =    oldTimestamp;

if (currentTime - thisShip.lastFired >= thisShip.cooldownTime) {
    thisShip.fire(); // push the model, set lastFired to current time, etc...
}

Also, in terms of what the other people are suggesting:

I'm not sure how you've implemented listening to keyboard-events...
But handling keys in JS, what I'd be most-inclined to do is let the keyboard fire as many keydown and keyup events as it wants. Instead of buffering that, have the only thing the key-event function does is tell a Keyboard object whether a key is down, or whether it is up.

Poll that Keyboard object during your update.

document.addEventListener("keydown", function (e) {
    var key = e.keyCode;
    if (!!Keyboard[key]) { return; } 
    Keyboard[key] = e.timeStamp;
});


document.addEventListener("keyup", function (e) {
    var key = e.keyCode;
    delete Keyboard[key];
});

Poll to see if the key is down. By setting the value of the key to e.timeStamp, you now know when they started holding it down, so you can gate how often your ship fires.

Better, you can set up a few abstracted systems, like:

var Keymap = { SPACE : 32, A : 65, ... };
Player1.controls = { FIRE : "SPACE" };

var code = Keymap[Player1.controls.FIRE],
    pressedSince = Keyboard[code]; // timestamp || undefined

Now you have something you can compare to your cooldown period and gates. It won't matter how fast they tap, or if keyboards work via turbo-fire by default, you should have all of the data-points required to prevent turbo-fire, to allow held-down auto-fire (gated at 250ms, or gated to having only 3 bullets onscreen, or whatever), and gated to a smaller value if you detect that the key keeps being tapped, to let button-mashers have a slight edge over button-holders.

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yes, I am using requestAnimationFrame –  user1555300 Sep 16 '12 at 9:42

I'm assuming you have the if(player.fire){...} part of your code within your game loop? If so that is why it is being triggered so often. Most usual solutions to this are to have a 'cool off' period after one fire event has occured, before the user can fire again. e.g:

if ( player.fireWait > 0 ) {
  player.fireWait--;
}

if( player.fire && (player.fireWait == 0) ){
  player.fireWait = 20;
  fire( thisShip );
}

The one problem with the above is that if the user hits the fire button repeatedly they wont be able to fire again (until the .fireWait counter hits 0 again). This is why whereever your onkeydown is you'll need to do this:

player.fireWait = 0;

However another poster has correctly stated that you will need to employ a keyboard buffer as well in order for your fire mechanism to work as most games would. Without a buffer, if the user holds down space you will get a singular shot... and then after a period of time you'll suddenly get rapid shot. The reason for this is because keydown is tied to the normal keyboard input, which if you hold down a key you will see what happenssssssssssssssssssss.

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You need to use some kind of keyboard buffer.
I would advise looking at this blog post.
The comments are also very usefull, from them you can find: this site

All you are doing right now is delaying the fire action by half a second, but all caught "keydown" are still sent.
I would also consider using "keyup", might work better.

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