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I have this code:

   $.ajax({


        type: "POST",
        url: "/api/slide",
        cache: false,
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        data: '{"Title":"fghfdhgfdgfd"}',
        dataType: "json",

An this is my controler:

public class SlideController : ApiController
{

    // POST /api/Slide
    public void Post(string Title)
    {
    }

When I run the code and call the /api/Slide, the [Title] has no data and is null.

How do I post json the the api controler?

POST http://127.0.0.2:81/api/slide HTTP/1.1
Host: 127.0.0.2:81
Connection: keep-alive
Content-Length: 18
Origin: http://127.0.0.2:81
X-Requested-With: XMLHttpRequest
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/21.0.1180.89 Safari/537.1
Content-Type: application/json; charset=UTF-8
Accept: application/json, text/javascript, */*; q=0.01
Referer: http://127.0.0.2:81/
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8
Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3

Title=fghfdhgfdgfd
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Define a view model:

public class SlideViewModel
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

then have your controller action take this view model as argument:

public class SlideController : ApiController
{
    // POST /api/Slide
    public void Post(SlideViewModel model)
    {
        ...
    }
}

finally invoke the action:

$.ajax({
    type: 'POST',
    url: '/api/slide',
    cache: false,
    contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
    data: JSON.stringify({ title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" }),
    success: function() {
        ...    
    }
});

The reason for that is that simple types such as strings are bound from the URI. I also invite you to read the following article about model binding in the Web API.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't understand how it knows which action we are trying to call? In this controller we can have hundreds of them. –  webdeveloper Sep 16 '12 at 12:50
1  
It's RESTful and conventional. You are using POST verb in your jQuery request => the Post action is invoked. If you used the GET verb (for example typing the action name directly in your browser address bar) => the Get action would have been invoked. So you cannot have hundreds of them. The standard HTTP verbs are GET, POST, PUT and DELETE so those are the action names you should be using. Of course you could always violate the standard RESTful conventions => go ahead and modify the routes in your ~/App_Start/WebApiConfig.cs file so that you include the action name in the url. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 16 '12 at 12:52
    
I wonder what is the difference between data: JSON.stringify({ title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" }), and data: '{Title:"fghfdhgfdgfd"}', that I ended up using? –  user1615362 Sep 16 '12 at 12:54
1  
Of course that there's a difference. The JSON.stringify method generates a JSON encoded string of the javascript variable you are sending. Whereas if you use simply { title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" } then jQuery is no longer sending a JSON encoded string at all. It is using an application/x-www-form-urlencoded request, thta's why you should remove the contentType: 'application/json' setting in this case. –  Darin Dimitrov Sep 16 '12 at 12:55
    
Thanks, I understand my misunderstanding. –  webdeveloper Sep 16 '12 at 13:01

Ensure the object you are trying to convert to has a default (empty) constructor.

Rule of thumb: If you want to deserialize to an object, you need to make it simple for the objects to be created. These guidelines can help:

  • All properties that are to be passed around must be public

  • the object needs to able to be constructed without any parameters.

This JSON string/object for example:

{ Name: "John Doe", Phone: "123-456-7890", Pets: [ "dog", "cat", "snake" ] }

can be converted to an object from the following class:

 public class Person {

     public string Name { get; set; }
     public string Phone { get; set; }
     public string[] Pets { get; set; }

  }

or this one:

public class Person {

   public string Name { get; set; }
   public string Phone { get; set; }
   public string[] Pets { get; set; }
   public Person() {}
   public Person(string name, string phone) {
      Name = name;
      Phone = phone;
   }

}

or this one:

public class Person {

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Phone { get; set; }
    public string[] Pets { get; set; }
    public Person() {}


 }

but not this one

public class Person {

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Phone { get; set; }
    public string[] Pets { get; set; }
    public Person(string name, string phone) {
      Name = name;
      Phone = phone;
    }

}

Now let ASP.NET MVC 4 do the rest

public class PersonController : ApiController
{
        // .. other actions 
        public HttpResponseMessage PostPerson(Person person)
        {
            if ( null != person)
                // CELEBRATE by doing something with your object
            else 
                // BE SAD and throw and exception or pass an error message

        }
        // .. other actions 
}

If your class cannot have a default constructor or if you don't have access to the source code for the class, you can create an adapter class that

  • has a default constructor
  • exposes those properties that need to be public

Using the Person class above with no default constructor, an adapter could look like

public class PersonAdapter {

    public Person personAdaptee;

    public string Name {
        get { return personAdaptee.Name; }
        set { personAdaptee.Name = value }
    }

    public string Phone {
        get { return personModel.Phone; }
        set { personModel.Phone = value; }
    }

    public string[] Pets {
        get { return personAdaptee.Pets; }
        set {personAdaptee.Pets = value }
    }

    public PersonAdapter() {

        personAdaptee = new Person("", "", null);

    }

}

Now let ASP.NET MVC 4 do the rest

public class PersonController : ApiController
{
        // .. other actions 
        public HttpResponseMessage PostPerson(PersonAdapter person)
        {
            if ( null != person)
                // CELEBRATE by doing something with your object
            else 
                // BE SAD and throw and exception or pass an error message

        }
        // .. other actions 
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/api/slide",
    data: { Title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" }
});

It is the quotes around the data attribute which are causing this:

i.e >> data: { Title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" }
not >> data: '{ Title: "fghfdhgfdgfd" }'

UPDATE:
Also your controller seems a little strange, although it is hard to tell without seeing your routing, etc.

I would expect to see something more like this:

public class SlideController : ApiController
{
    public HttpResponseMessage PostSlide(string Title)
    {
        // Do your insert slide stuff here....

        string uri = Url.Link("DefaultApi", new { id = item.Id });
        response.Headers.Location = new Uri(uri);
        return response;
    }
}

Clearly, you will also need to update the URL in your jQuery too.

Take a look here:

http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/getting-started-with-aspnet-web-api/tutorial-your-first-web-api

ANOTHER UPDATE:

It would be usual to create a CLR object to match your Json and use the MVC model binder to bind directly to that. If you don't want to do that you can bind to an object and deserialize into a Dictionary:

// POST api/values
public void Post(object json)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> values = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Dictionary<string, string>>(json.ToString());
    var x = values["Title"];
}
share|improve this answer
    
the change did not help, I still get null when I breakpoint in the controller. –  user1615362 Sep 16 '12 at 10:33
    
Just posted an update to my original answer. –  Steve Lydford Sep 16 '12 at 10:37
    
Are you sure that you are using MVC 4 API Controller? I am using the default MVC 4 API Controller scaffolding, with the empty methods. –  user1615362 Sep 16 '12 at 10:40
    
Have you had a look at the HTTP headers with Fiddler to check what is being posted? –  Steve Lydford Sep 16 '12 at 10:50
1  
New update added to OP –  Steve Lydford Sep 16 '12 at 12:11

Cast the action parameter to FromBody i.e:

public class SlideController : ApiController
{

    // POST /api/Slide
    public void Post([FromBody]string Title)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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