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Does anybody know a Python module to easily extract temporal expressions such as 12/01/2011 and Monday, 12/3/1987 or others (in English format)?

Would like to avoid to build a huge set of regex.

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The locale of python should match the locale of the day cf. mancoosi.org/~abate/parse-french-dates-enus-machine –  amirouche Sep 16 '12 at 11:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the standard library you won't find something comprehensive, but if you install dateutils, you can do this:

>>> from dateutils import parser
>>> parser.parse('January 12, 2012').strftime('%s')
'1326315600'
>>> parser.parse('01/12/2012').strftime('%s')
'1326315600'
>>> parser.parse('Sunday, 16/09/2012').strftime('%s')
'1347742800'

Martijn had a point, so here is the normal representation - which is datetime object:

>>> parser.parse('Sunday, 16/09/2012')
datetime.datetime(2012, 9, 16, 0, 0)
>>> parser.parse('01/12/2012')
datetime.datetime(2012, 1, 12, 0, 0)
>>> parser.parse('January 12, 2012')
datetime.datetime(2012, 1, 12, 0, 0)
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Why use .strftime('%s') in your examples at all? –  Martijn Pieters Sep 16 '12 at 11:19
    
To demonstrate that it is parsing values correctly. It normally returns datetime objects. –  Burhan Khalid Sep 16 '12 at 11:40
    
Exactly, and those don't demonstrate that the parsing succeeded? –  Martijn Pieters Sep 16 '12 at 11:41
1  
You know (as always) you are right :) –  Burhan Khalid Sep 16 '12 at 11:43

Use the standard datetime.datetime.strptime().

Example:

In : datetime.datetime.strptime("12/01/2012", "%m/%d/%Y")
Out: datetime.datetime(2012, 12, 1, 0, 0)
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