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Please have a look at this code :

class Foo {
    public int a;
    public Foo() {
        a = 3;
    }
    public void addFive() {
        a += 5;
    }
    public int getA() {
        System.out.println("we are here in base class!");
        return  a;
    }
}

public class Polymorphism extends Foo{
    public int a;
    public Poylmorphism() {
        a = 5;
    }
    public void addFive() {
        System.out.println("we are here !" + a);
        a += 5;
    }
    public int getA() {
        System.out.println("we are here in sub class!");
        return  a;
    }

    public static void main(String [] main) {
        Foo f = new Polymorphism();
        f.addFive();
        System.out.println(f.getA());
        System.out.println(f.a);
    }
}

Here we assign reference of object of class Polymorphism to variable of type Foo, classic polmorphism. Now we call method addFive which has been overridden in class Polymorphism. Then we print the variable value from a getter method which also has been overridden in class Polymorphism. So we get answer as 10. But when public variable a is SOP'ed we get answer 3!!

How did this happen? Even though reference variable type was Foo but it was referring to object of Polymorphism class. So why did accessing f.a not result into value of a in the class Polymorphism getting printed? Please help

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is due to the fact that you can't override class varibles. When accessing a class variable, type of the reference, rather than the type of the object, is what decides what you will get.

If you remove the redeclaration of a in the subclass, then I assume that behaviour will be more as expected.

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ohh..Then can you also explain me why is it that way? I mean what could be the implications if variable too were overridden? Because checking object type while calling mmethods and checking class type while getting fields sound strange –  Shades88 Sep 16 '12 at 11:38
    
I can try ;) The reference type decides which methods and variables are available for calling. What you do with polymorphism is to override the behaviour of these available methods. But, since you can't override class variables, you will always get the value of the variable in the class of the reference type. –  Tobb Sep 16 '12 at 11:55

You're hiding the a of Polymorphism - you should actually get a compiler warning for that. Therefore those are two distinct a fields. In contrast to methods fields cannot be virtual. Good practice is not to have public fields at all, but only methods for mutating private state (encapsulation).

If you want to make it virtual, you need to make it as a property with accessor methods (e.g. what you have: getA).

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one thing that might potentially clarify this is looking up the definition of "alpha renaming," which is what's morally happening here. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 16 '12 at 11:38
    
why is that object type is checked while calling methods and class type is checked while getting fields? What could be the result if variables too were referred by the object type? –  Shades88 Sep 16 '12 at 11:40
2  
@Shades88, looking up virtual fields would imply to execute a "getter" code. Fields are offsets in the object data, while methods are independent of the actual object data; their address is stored in a virtual method table which only exists once per class. Methods are just passed in a pointer to the object data, they are not part of the data. Note that as soon as fields are private, this becomes irrelevant anyways since no code other than the methods of the class declaring the field can see it. –  Lucero Sep 16 '12 at 11:51
1  
@Shades88, I have indeed done some compiler-related stuff, albeit not in the Java world. Quick recap: "final" (non-virtual) methods have a fixed address in memory, they are called and the first argument is "this" (e.g. the instance). Note that the call itself requires no knowledge or access to the instance. A field access is different: for a given type, it is known at which offset of the instance data the field data is stored. So this+field_offset points to the field data. Now in common OO runtimes, the first field is a hidden field pointing to the class data. (cont.) –  Lucero Sep 16 '12 at 13:02
1  
This class data is not only used to determine the type, but it also hold a virtual method table (VT). So just like the offset for a field is known in the instance data, each virtual method has a known offset for its pointer in the VT, and when a virtual call is invoked the compiler just has to load the VT entry for the method and invoke that pointer. Note that this has no effect whatsoever on the memory layout of the instance, and the index in the VT is also always the same for the same method. So arguably fields are virtual by design - unless you perform alpha renaming, just as with methods. –  Lucero Sep 16 '12 at 13:10

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