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I am starting to learn C.

Now, from what I understand, pointer is used for pointing to address of another variable and changing that variable value by not directly approaching it.

Now, I have 3 questions:

  1. Is that even right? If so, why do I need it?

  2. Are there any other uses?

  3. Is there any difference between the following lines of code:

    // 1
    int x = 10;
    int *ptr = &x;
    // 2
    int x = 10;
    int ptr = &x;
    
share|improve this question
4  
you can get the answer to these questions easily if you google it. – Rahul Tripathi Sep 16 '12 at 13:23
    
I currently have a lot of tabs opened about pointers, but none of them is really straight forward. I wanted to know if I got that right. – AdamGold Sep 16 '12 at 13:26
2  
Just a tip - when learning about pointers, don't just read and code - draw it. It really does help to draw your stack, your variables, and your pointers, and use arrows gratuitously. – xdumaine Sep 16 '12 at 13:33
1  
No one's mentioned it directly, but pointers are also used to provide an out parameter, where you can change the actual variable the user passes in, and they can also be used for passing large data types, as only the few bytes of the pointer will be copied, not the whole structure. – chris Sep 16 '12 at 13:35
1  
@AdamGold, Yes, I mean in a function. Something like strcpy, for example, will modify the actual variable passed in. Here's an example. As for passing large types, here's something to illustrate that. Assuming an int is 4 bytes, a double 8, and a pointer 4, using the slower function causes 1.2MB of stuff to be copied. Using the faster function causes 4 bytes to be copied (the pointer). Imagine the difference it makes in a loop. – chris Sep 16 '12 at 15:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The value of a pointer is the location of another object in memory. So given the first set of declarations:

int x = 10;
int *ptr = &x;

You'd have something like the following in memory (addresses are pulled out of thin air and not meant to represent any real platform):

Item        Address           0x00  0x01  0x02  0x03
----        -------           ----  ----  ----  ----
   x        0x08001000        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x0A
 ptr        0x08001004        0x08  0x00  0x10  0x00

x contains the value 10. ptr contains the address of x. Thus, the expressions x and *ptr are equivalent; reading or writing to *ptr is the same as reading or writing to x.

FWIW, the difference between that and

int x = 10;
int ptr = &x;

is that ptr is treated as an integer, not a pointer to integer, so the compiler will yak if you try something like *ptr (the operand of unary * must be a pointer type).

So, why pointers?

Pointers in C serve 3 purposes:

First, pointers allow us to mimic pass-by-reference semantics. In C, all function arguments are passed by value; that means that the function's formal arguments are different objects in memory from the actual arguments. For example, take this swap function:

void swap(int a, int b)
{
  int t = a;
  a = b;
  b = t;
}

int main(void)
{
  int x = 1, y = 2;
  swap(x, y);
  ...
}

If we look at memory, we have something like the following:

Item        Address           0x00  0x01  0x02  0x03
----        -------           ----  ----  ----  ----
   x        0x08001000        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x01
   y        0x08001004        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x02
   a        0x08001010        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x01
   b        0x08001014        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x02

This means any changes made to a and b are not reflected in x or y; after the call to swap, x and y will remain unchanged.

However, if we pass pointers to x and y to swap, like so:

void swap(int *a, int *b)
{
  int t = *a;
  *a = *b;
  *b = t;
}

int main(void)
{
  int x = 1, y = 2;
  swap(&x, &y);
  ...
}

then our memory looks something like this:

Item        Address           0x00  0x01  0x02  0x03
----        -------           ----  ----  ----  ----
   x        0x08001000        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x01
   y        0x08001004        0x00  0x00  0x00  0x02
   a        0x08001010        0x08  0x00  0x10  0x00
   b        0x08001014        0x08  0x00  0x10  0x04

a and b contain the addresses of x and y, so reading and writing from the expressions *a and *b are equivalent to reading and writing from x and y. Thus, after this call to swap, the values of x and y will be changed.

The second reason we use pointers is to track dynamically-allocated memory. When we want to create a new object at runtime, we use the malloc or calloc call, which allocates the memory and returns a pointer to it:

int *p = malloc(sizeof *p * N); // dynamically allocates enough memory
                                // to hold N integer values and saves
                                // the location to p

Pointers are the only way to track dynamically-allocated memory in C.

Finally, pointers allow us to create dynamic data structures such as lists, trees, queues, etc. The idea is that each element in the structure explicitly points to the next element. For example, here's a type that defines a simple list of integers:

struct elem
{
  int data;
  struct elem *next;
};

Each object of type struct elem explicitly points to the following item of type struct elem. This allows us to add items to or remove them from the list as necessary (unlike arrays), and it allows us to order the list as we build it (I'd post an example, but I'm bloody tired, and it probably wouldn't make sense; you'll get to them soon enough anyway).

share|improve this answer

A pointer is a memory address, right.

But it doesn't point necessarily to a single variable.
Imagine the following:

int * x = malloc( 2 * sizeof( int ) );

You have here a pointer to a memory area that can contains 2 integers.
So:

  • x[ 0 ] is the first int
  • x[ 1 ] is the second int

When dereferencing, you'll assign in that example the first one:

*x = 0; // same as x[ 0 ] = 0

About your third question, there is indeed a difference:

int x    = 10;
int *ptr = &x; // As expected, ptr is now a pointer to x
int x    = 10;
int ptr  = &x; // Certainly not what you expect as ptr is not a pointer

In the second case, you assign a memory address to an integer. It's not a pointer, and you will have issues if the length of a pointer is not the same as an int (in 64bits platforms, for instance).

Pointers are nice because you can do arithmetics.

int * x  = malloc( 2 * sizeof( int ) );
int * x2 = x; // So we don't touch x, as we'll need to free it.

x2++; // Now x2 points to the second integer.

x2[ 0 ] = 0; // same as x[ 1 ] = 0;

The increment is done based on the pointer type. This is usually where the magic begins.

If we're on a platform where the size of a short is 2, you can imagine the following:

short * x  = malloc( 2 * sizeof( short ) );
char  * x2 = ( char * )x;

As the size of a char is 1, you can now access each byte of your previous short pointer (4 bytes, as we allocated two of them).

So:

x2[ 0 ] -> First short / First byte
x2[ 1 ] -> First short / Second byte
x2[ 2 ] -> Second short / First byte
x2[ 3 ] -> Second short / Second byte

And finally, pointers are also good when you deal with structures, for instance, and you need to pass them as arguments.
In such a case, using a pointer will pass the struct address. Otherwise, the struct will need be copied at call time, which is not efficient at all.

void foo( struct x p );   // Structure data will be copied
void bar( struct x * p ); // Only the address will be passed, no data copied
share|improve this answer

Pointer is generally used to store the address of the variable. Here in the first case &x gives the address x and variable *ptr has the value store at location to which address value store at ptr pointed. In the second case ptr store the address of variable x.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<inttypes.h>
int main()
{
    int x = 10;
    int *ptr = &x;
    uintptr_t p = (uintptr_t)&x;
    printf("x=%d ,*ptr=%d,ptr=%p,p=%p",x,*ptr,ptr,p);
    return 0;
}

On my machine, this code produces:

  x=10 ,*ptr=10,ptr=0028FF14,p=0028FF14
share|improve this answer
2  
Note that the code and formatting more or less works when sizeof(int) == sizeof(void *), which is true for 32-bit environments and not 64-bit environments. You should be getting a compilation warning for the int p = &x; line; for this demonstration, that's OK. You should consider using %p instead of %d for printing the address (ptr), or use <inttypes.h> and uintptr_t and PRIXPTR or PRIdPTR. If the type of p is changed to uintptr_t (an unsigned integer big enough to hold a pointer value) — uintptr_t p = (uintptr_t)&x; — then you'd print that similarly. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 16 '12 at 13:59

A pointer stores the address of memory of the given type. &x is the address of the variable x, which currently stores the value 10. An int* ptr can hold this location. To alter 10 (aka x) you could say

*ptr = 3;

Your second block of code is storing the address in ptr as if it were an actual number. This means when you attempt to print out ptr you will notice it is a semi-random number (probably very high).

I would suggest you research how these basic data types are stored in memory.

As for the uses, you can create functions that will be able to alter memory outside of their scope rather than make local copies for themselves. If you keep learning and get to functions it should be explained better. What are you using to learn C? I would highly suggest ditching what you have and getting K&R.

share|improve this answer
    
&x is the address of the location the variable x is stored at, which has the value 10. Important distinction to make in my opinion. – Femaref Sep 16 '12 at 13:28
    
I am just learning of the internet. Anyway, I think I got it now. Thank you very much. – AdamGold Sep 16 '12 at 14:46

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