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EDIT The question was finding the divisors of numbers like 1,3,6,10,15 which follows n*(n+1)/2 pattern. I got the answer, thanks

I was going through this following code snippet by an experienced programmer.

int number = 0;
int i = 1;

while(NumberOfDivisors(number) < 500){
    number += i;
    i++;

I tried a lot but I cannot understand about the following part of code.

number += i;
i++;

Why doesn't he just increment number itself? If he uses the same code, won't some numbers miss during the execution? What is the logic behind it?

Here is the rest of the code

private int NumberOfDivisors(int number) {
    int nod = 0;
    int sqrt = (int) Math.Sqrt(number);

    for(int i = 1; i<= sqrt; i++){
        if(number % i == 0){
            nod += 2;
        }
    }
    //Correction if the number is a perfect square
    if (sqrt * sqrt == number) {
        nod--;
    }

    return nod;
}

I understood the above part. Can't understand the first part.

As one of the answer said The iteration would look like this:

NumberOfDivisors(0)
    0 += 1
NumberOfDivisors(1)
    1 += 2
NumberOfDivisors(3)
    3 += 3
NumberOfDivisors(6)

etc.

Why did he eliminate 2,4,5 etc???

share|improve this question
    
It's not clear from this code why he did that - you'd have to provide more code or tell what the program does. –  Abraham Sep 16 '12 at 14:02
    
What is the code actually supposed to do? What is the implementation of NumberOfDivisors? –  phant0m Sep 16 '12 at 14:04
1  
Seems to be a loop to get the first number n(n+1)/2 with at least 500 divisors ... but what for ? then end of the code could give us a hint –  Kwariz Sep 16 '12 at 14:10
    
Write the loop you're confused about and output the iteration # and what all the variables are if you're confused about how the code works. If you are wondering why the code was written that way, well, you don't give us enough info to figure that out. –  BSull Sep 16 '12 at 14:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The original author did that to solve this problem : Triangle number with 500 divisors. Follow the link to get the explanations, the code you posted is even there ...

The sequence of triangle numbers is generated by adding the natural numbers.
So the 7th triangle number would be 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 28.
The first ten terms would be:
1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 55, …
Let us list the factors of the first seven triangle numbers:
1: 1
3: 1,3
6: 1,2,3,6
10: 1,2,5,10
15: 1,3,5,15
21: 1,3,7,21
28: 1,2,4,7,14,28
We can see that 28 is the first triangle number to have over five divisors.
What is the value of the first triangle number to have over five hundred divisors?
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. The place I took the code from did not mention the question properly. Now I got it :) –  user1652263 Sep 16 '12 at 14:25

He's not just incrementing it. He's adding i which get's bigger every time.

+= 1;
+= 2;
etc.
share|improve this answer

The iteration would look like this:

NumberOfDivisors(0)
    0 += 1
NumberOfDivisors(1)
    1 += 2
NumberOfDivisors(3)
    3 += 3
NumberOfDivisors(6)

etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Why did he eliminate 2, 4, 5?? –  user1652263 Sep 16 '12 at 14:10
    
I can't really say, you gave piecemeal bits of the code, can you give the entire code? –  Korvin Szanto Sep 16 '12 at 14:12

That is some kind of heuristic, since number of divisors grows non-linearly, it is better to check numbers in non-linear order. I do not see how it is connected to approximate growth rate, may be it is just a random-intuitive pick of the author.

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