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In my app I have multiple views, some views need to support both portrait and landscape, while other views need to support portrait only. Thus, in the project summary, I have all selected all orientations.

The below code worked to disable landscape mode on a given view controller prior to iOS 6:

- (BOOL)shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation:(UIInterfaceOrientation)interfaceOrientation
{
    // Return YES for supported orientations
    return (interfaceOrientation == UIInterfaceOrientationPortrait);
}

Since shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation was deprecated in iOS6 I've replaced the above with:

-(NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;
}

This method is correctly called when the view appears (I can set a breakpoint to ensure this), but the interface still rotates to landscape mode regardless of the fact that I'm returning the mask for portrait modes only. What am I doing wrong?

It seems that it's currently impossible to build an app that has different orientation requirements per view. It seems to only adhere to the orientations specified in the project summary.

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Please refer this [link][1] may help. [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/12526054/… –  John Sep 22 '12 at 9:59
    
Here I've posted my solution/experince in tab bar controller with rotations: stackoverflow.com/a/12774037/751641 –  wzbozon Oct 8 '12 at 0:43
    
I met same issue. Following answer is much helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/12996293/… –  Jason Wu Jun 17 at 5:17

15 Answers 15

up vote 45 down vote accepted

If your are using a UINavigationController as the root window controller, it will be its shouldAutorotate & supportedInterfaceOrientations which would be called.

Idem if you are using a UITabBarController, and so on.

So the thing to do is to subclass your navigation/tabbar controller and override its shouldAutorotate & supportedInterfaceOrientations methods.

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3  
Ok, but in this way all pushed views are going to have the same rotation rules, correct ? I want some views to rotate and some to not rotate. –  Patrick Sep 22 '12 at 9:37
    
By the way, I've subclassed the UIVIewController and such methods are never invoked. (Only the methods of the pushed views are invoked). –  Patrick Sep 22 '12 at 9:49
1  
You should subclass your main navigation controller (or the tabbar controller). For your first comment, I would test what controller is visible in the navController supportedInterfaceOrientations method and return the right supported orientation. –  Martin Sep 22 '12 at 11:15
    
I will attempt this, If it solves my problem too, ill upvote :) thanks for the insight.. –  The Lazy Coder Sep 26 '12 at 17:59
    
That's not the only reason. It's just one reason why supportedInterfaceOrientations way be not called. Nevertheless, first time I see a -1 accepted answer :) –  Martin Sep 27 '12 at 8:21

try change this code in AppDelegate.m

//   self.window.rootViewController = self.navigationController;

    [window setRootViewController:navigationController];

this is the complete answer

shouldAutorotateToInterfaceOrientation not being called in iOS 6

XD

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That was it! I was actually using[window addSubview:tabBarController.view]; –  Ken Pletzer Sep 21 '12 at 20:27
    
Thank you! That worked for me too. I also had [_window addSubview:self.view]. Changing to [_window setRootViewController:self] did the trick. –  Joris Weimar Sep 21 '12 at 22:39
    
This did not work for me, I had to subclass my UINavigationController (that is the root controller) to get this to work. –  Martin Ingvar Kofoed Jensen Sep 22 '12 at 6:36
    
@MartinIngvarKofoedJensen However, if you subclass UINavigationController, you specify the same rotation rule for all subviews right ? I need different rotation policies for different views pushed by the navigation controller. –  Patrick Sep 22 '12 at 9:31
    
@Patrick I think so. I have to UINavigationControllers, one for portrait and one for landscape. My app is mainly in portrait, but when i need to go to landscape I push a instance of the landscape navigation controller with the view as root view onto the portrait navigation controller. –  Martin Ingvar Kofoed Jensen Sep 23 '12 at 18:36

In my case I have UINavigationController and my view controller inside. I had to subclass UINavigationController and, in order to support only Portrait, add this method:

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait | UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortraitUpsideDown;
}

So in the UINavigationController subclass I need to check which orientation is supported by the current topViewController.

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return [[self topViewController] supportedInterfaceOrientations];
}
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1  
This is brilliant! The topViewController thing was the point that I was missing. Thanks a lot! –  Henning Schulz Sep 26 '12 at 9:26
    
@Pavel what is [self topViewController] exactly? Is that a method you have created? Thanks! –  Alex G Oct 8 '12 at 1:17
    
No.topViewController is a property in UINavigationController. –  Pavel Oct 8 '12 at 6:13
    
Thank you! This is exactly what I was trying to do: set the supported orientations to the UIViewController currently being displayed in the UINavigationController. My only problem with this is that the Apple reference for UINavigationController says "this class was not intended for subclassing." But, I'm not sure how to do this without subclassing UINavigationController. –  thoughtadvances Dec 18 '12 at 5:36

One thing I've found is if you have an old application that is still doing

[window addSubView:viewcontroller.view];  //This is bad in so may ways but I see it all the time...

You will need to update that to:

[window setRootViewController:viewcontroller]; //since iOS 4

Once you do this the orientation should begin to work again.

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1  
This is yet another answer I wish I could upvote twice. The reason you see it the "bad" way so much is because that is how Xcode File > New Project was creating it back in the day. –  BP. Sep 24 '12 at 13:33

The best way for iOS6 specifically is noted in "iOS6 By Tutorials" by the Ray Wenderlich team - http://www.raywenderlich.com/ and is better than subclassing UINavigationController for most cases.

I'm using iOS6 with a storyboard that includes a UINavigationController set as the initial view controller.

//AppDelegate.m - this method is not available pre-iOS6 unfortunately

- (NSUInteger)application:(UIApplication *)application supportedInterfaceOrientationsForWindow:(UIWindow *)window{
NSUInteger orientations = UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAllButUpsideDown;

if(self.window.rootViewController){
    UIViewController *presentedViewController = [[(UINavigationController *)self.window.rootViewController viewControllers] lastObject];
    orientations = [presentedViewController supportedInterfaceOrientations];
}

return orientations;

}

//MyViewController.m - return whatever orientations you want to support for each UIViewController

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;

}

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worked like a charm for me, many thanks! –  ToddB Jan 2 '13 at 20:46
    
This worked for me. –  Bilal Ahmed Oct 19 '13 at 3:03

As stated by others if you're using a UINavigationController and you want to customize various views you'll want to subclass the UINavigationController and make sure you have these two components:

@implementation CustomNavigationController

// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
//  supportedInterfaceOrientations:
//  Overridden to return the supportedInterfaceOrientations of the view controller
//  at the top of the navigation stack.
//  By default, UIViewController (and thus, UINavigationController) always returns
//  UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAllButUpsideDown when the app is run on an iPhone.
// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return [self.topViewController supportedInterfaceOrientations]; 
}

// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
//  shouldAutorotate
//  Overridden to return the shouldAutorotate value of the view controller
//  at the top of the navigation stack.
//  By default, UIViewController (and thus, UINavigationController) always returns
//  YES when the app is run on an iPhone.
// -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- (BOOL)shouldAutorotate
{
    return [self.topViewController shouldAutorotate];
}

Then in any view that is a portrait only you would include:

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;
}

And in any view that is everything but upside down:

- (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAllButUpsideDown;
}
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The best Way I thonk is to do a Category rather than subclassing uinavigationcontroller or uitabbarcontroller

your UINavigationController+Rotation.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface UINavigationController (Rotation)

@end

your UINavigationController+Rotation.m

#import "UINavigationController+Rotation.h"

@implementation UINavigationController (Rotation)

-(BOOL)shouldAutorotate
{
    return [[self.viewControllers lastObject] shouldAutorotate];
}

-(NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
{
    return [[self.viewControllers lastObject] supportedInterfaceOrientations];
}

- (UIInterfaceOrientation)preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation
{
    return [[self.viewControllers lastObject] preferredInterfaceOrientationForPresentation];
}


@end

Try to make all your controller import this categorie and this work like a charm. You can even make a controller not rotating and pushing another controller that will rotate.

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5  
Overriding methods in a category is a really bad idea, as you have no guarantee which method (the original class method or the category method) will be called. –  Shawn Craver Nov 6 '12 at 16:04

Basically as someone stated above, but in more detail:

  1. Create a new file that is a subclass of UINavigationController
  2. Go to your storyboard and then click on the Navigation Controller, set its class to the one that you just created
  3. In this class(.m file) add the following code so it will remain in portrait mode:

    (BOOL)shouldAutorotate
    {
      return NO;
    } 
    
    (NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations
    {
     return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;
    }
    

This worked for me

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Try add shouldAutorotate method

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I've tried it, but it is never invoked: -(BOOL)shouldAutorotate { return NO; } –  Patrick Sep 17 '12 at 18:40

Firstly in order to make your app work in only mode you should be returning UIInterfaceOrientationMaskLandscape. In case you want to keep only portrait mode, you are doing things correctly.

Just add the UISupportedInterfaceOrientations key in the Info.plist and assign the interface orientation values your app intends to keep.

Also, you should be returning false from shouldAutoRotate in case you want to avoid auto rotation totally. But I would suggest you to return true from here and specify the correct orientations in supportedInterfaceOrientations method.

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I don't understand why I should change the Info.plist. I want to restrict the orientation to portrait mode for specific views only (not all of them). Consequently, in my info.plist I've all rotations enabled, and I think I need to disable the landscape modes in the UIViewController of the views I don't want to rotate. Right ? –  Patrick Sep 17 '12 at 18:36
    
I've tried to use shouldAutorotate but it is never invoked –  Patrick Sep 17 '12 at 19:11
    
Values in Info.plist were used only at launch time previously. With iOS 6, these values are intersected with values returned from supportedInterfaceOrientations and for an intersected value, stage auto rotates. In case your app supports multiple orientations at launch time, you can return MaskAll from supportedInterfaceOrientationsForWindow callback. –  vabhatia Sep 18 '12 at 4:50
    
if you are not receiving the shouldAutorotate callback, the you must not be setting the current view controller as the rootViewController. –  vabhatia Sep 18 '12 at 4:51

This code worked for me:

-(BOOL)shouldAutorotate {
     return YES;
}

-(NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations {
    return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAll;
}

iPhone/iPad App Orientation check out my own answer

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I'm actually trying to restrict the orientations to Portrait. I Think your code allows all orientations instead. –  Patrick Sep 22 '12 at 9:36
    
Define the orientation limitations in your info.plist file. I use this code for a Universal app, the iPhone supports Portrait and PortraitUpsideDown, and the iPad supports all layouts. –  tdunham02 Sep 23 '12 at 16:31

I have the same situation as you. I know you already accepted an answer, but I thought I'd add another one anyway. This is the way I understand the new version of the rotation system to work. The root view controller is the only view controller to ever be called. The reasoning, I believe, is that with child view controllers it doesn't make sense often to rotate their views since they will just stay within the frame of the root view controller anyway.

So, what happens. First shouldAutorotate is called on the root view controller. If NO is returned then everything stops. If YES is returned then the supportedInterfaceOrientations method is invoked. If the interface orientation is confirmed in this method and the global supported orientations from either the Info.plist or the application delegate, then the view will rotate. Before the rotation the shouldAutomaticallyForwardRotationMethods method is queried. If YES (the default), then all children will receive the will and didRotateTo... methods as well as the parent (and they in turn will forward it to their children).

My solution (until there is a more eloquent one) is to query the last child view controller during the supportedInterfaceOrientations method and return its value. This lets me rotate some areas while keeping others portrait only. I realize it is fragile, but I don't see another way that doesn't involve complicating things with event calls, callbacks, etc.

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If you are using UINavigationController, you have to implement shouldAutorotate and supportedInterfaceOrientations in subclass of UINavigationController.

These are able to control by two steps, if shouldAutorotate returns YES then effective supportedInterfaceOrientations. It's a very nice combination.

This example, my mostly views are Portrait except CoverFlowView and PreviewView. The CoverFlowView transfer to PreviewView, PreviewView wants to follow CoverFlowCView's rotation.

@implementation MyNavigationController

-(BOOL)shouldAutorotate
{

if ([[self.viewControllers lastObject] isKindOfClass:NSClassFromString(@"PreviewView")])

return NO;

else

return YES;

}



-(NSUInteger)supportedInterfaceOrientations

{

if ([[self.viewControllers lastObject] isKindOfClass:NSClassFromString(@"CoverFlowView")])

return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskAllButUpsideDown;

else

return UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;

}

...

@end
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my solution : subclassed UINavigationController and set it as window.rootViewController

the top viewcontroller of the hierarchy will take control of the orientation , some code examples : subclassed UINavigationController

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The answers here pointed me in the correct direction although I couldn't get it to work by just cut and pasting because I am using UINavigationControllers inside of a UITabBarController. So my version in AppDelegate.m looks something like this, which will work for UITabBarControllers, UINavigationControllers or UINavigationControllers within a UITabBarController. If you are using other custom containment controllers, you would need to add them here (which is kind of a bummer).

- (UIViewController*)terminalViewController:(UIViewController*)viewController
{
  if ([viewController isKindOfClass:[UITabBarController class]])
  {
    viewController = [(UITabBarController*)viewController selectedViewController];
    viewController = [self terminalViewController:viewController];
  }
  else if ([viewController isKindOfClass:[UINavigationController class]])
  {
    viewController = [[(UINavigationController*)viewController viewControllers] lastObject];
  }

  return viewController;
}

- (NSUInteger)application:(UIApplication *)application
supportedInterfaceOrientationsForWindow:(UIWindow *)window
{
  NSUInteger orientations = UIInterfaceOrientationMaskPortrait;
  UIViewController* viewController = [self terminalViewController:window.rootViewController];

  if (viewController)
    orientations = [viewController supportedInterfaceOrientations];

  return orientations;
}

Another key thing to note is that you must override supportedInterfaceOrientations in your UIViewController subclasses or it will default to what you specified in your Info.plist.

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