Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 2 classes. One (A) collects some data and the other (B) sends the data to TCP/IP clients. The process is asynchronous with refresh rates from nearly zero to a few seconds. Note that this application has no GUI so I won't be able to use many built in "onChange" listeners.

In normal conditions I would simply write the code so that A calls a "send" method on B, passing the data, no problems here.

Now, assume that the rate A collects data is critical (real time) and that A cannot wait for B to complete the sending process (note that B uses TCP, not UDP). The way I implemented this is

  • A places the data in a field in B
  • B has a continuous loop that checks if the data is new or now. If new, it will send it out.

If during the send the data is updated a few times it doesn't matter, as long as it doesn't slow down A. Spawning a new thread for each send would in principle not slow down A but it's likely gonna result in a mess.

You can see that B is working in synchronous mode (but A isn't) and it's implemented with a while loop with a Thread.sleep() call. My questions are:

  1. Should I use a timer task instead of the while loop? I know that most people hate the Thread.sleep() call but ultimately the only thing I'm interested is in keeping CPU low.

  2. Isn't there a more elegant way than the synchronous approach? In some cases the data refresh of A is about 1 second and it would be nice if I could just have a listener that would act on an event. In such case a sleep time of 25ms would be a waste of cycles. In other cases it's very fast and I'd like no sleep at all.

*Example: imagine that A is submitting screenshots from your screen and B is sending them to the clients. Only the last one matters and B is gonna go as fast as possible *

Any ideas or suggestions? Please keep things as simple and low cpu as possible

thanks a lot!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would make it like this:

A collects the data in whatever fashion is appropriate and then post the "next message" to send. If there is already a message pending, let the new message replace / update the previous.

B checks for ay pending messages, if one is available it grabs it and send it to the client(s). However, if no message is pending, then B waits for one to be available.

Object lock = new Object();
Object pending = null;

public void post(Object message) {
    synchronized (lock) {
        pending = message;
        lock.notifyAll();
    }
}

public Object getNextMessage() {
    Object message;
    synchronized (lock) {
        while (pending == null) {
            try {
                lock.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // Ignore
            }
        }
        message = pending;
        pending = null;
    }
    return message;
}

Using a queue you could instead do

BlockingDeque<Object> queue = new LinkedBlockingDeque<Object>(1);

public void postMessage(Object message) {
    // If previous message is still pending we replace it.
    queue.clear();
    queue.offer(message);
}

public Object getNextMessage() {
    while (true) {
        try {
            return queue.take();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // Ignore interrupts
        }
    }
}

Of course in both example it would be good to instead of the while (true) use a signal so you can gracefully shut down.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this idea a lot but haven't really used locks so far. If I understand right there is no CPU involved during waiting, right? –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 14:46
    
No, lock use no extra CPU while waiting (not quite true, but close enough in most cases). I'll also add an example of how to use a Queue with only the latest message. –  Roger Lindsjö Sep 16 '12 at 14:58
1  
imagine that A is submitting screenshots from your screen and B is sending them to the clients. Only the last one matters and B is gonna go as fast as possible – If you can give a simple example of that it would be really great! –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 15:03
    
Just a question: How is "while (pending == null)..." different from "while (data_to_send==last_data_sent)..."? When I used that approach (no lock but with a loop of that kind) the CPU went up a lot.. –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 15:10
    
The code is waiting for data to be available (using notifyAll and wait). However, it is possible that wait() wakes up for other reasons than data becoming available, so in order to avoid sending null or sending the same message again I use the null check to see if I have a new message or if I should wait some more. Notice how I set the pending to null avoid resending the same message. –  Roger Lindsjö Sep 16 '12 at 15:15

I would set up a LinkedBlockingQueue between A and B whose size should not block A when the queue becomes full. In A, the method that collects the data will post it to the queue. In B, as long as there is an item in the queue, it is new and should be sent out.

If you want B to take advantage of multiple edits to a message by A to be merged and sent out as a single update, then I would do it using the Observer.

  1. The message that A keeps updating is the Observable.
  2. B is an observer of this message.
  3. Every time A updates the message, it is an indication for B to take some action.
  4. B can choose to send the update to the clients immediately
  5. B can also choose to wait for a certain period of time using a Timer and send the update to clients only after the timer fires off. The code to send update will be the TimerTask.
  6. B would not set the Timer again until A changes the message.
share|improve this answer
    
actually I only need B to sent the latest data available, no notification needed (sorry, I should have written in in the post) so not sure the queue is the way to go. A LIFO queue, for instance would transmit the latest info first but eventually I'm gonna get the old data sent to the clients.. Other ideas? –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 14:38
    
So, it is not latest data in absolute sense and only latest until B picks it up, right? Just need to confirm if I understand it correctly. –  Vikdor Sep 16 '12 at 14:39
    
yes, imagine that A is submitting screenshots from your screen and B is sending them to the clients. Only the last one matters and B is gonna go as fast as possible –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 14:45
    
@EmanueleRonchi, I updated the message with how I would do it using Observer pattern. –  Vikdor Sep 16 '12 at 15:10
    
Nice idea, I'll try to implement it! thanks a lot! –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 15:18

You can use an Exchanger

B will send information, use the exchanger to exchange (he might wait for A and its fine)
Once exchange is made he will send the information.

A will use the exchanger with timeout 0, which means if B isn't already waiting then we skip this exchange, if he waiting the the exchange will be made and A will continue with his job and B can now send information.

Information that comes while B is busy will be ignore (the exchange in A with timeout 0 will just throw an exception if B is busy, make sure you catch it)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm a bit worried that the executor will try to execute all the tasks eventually, or have I misunderstood?imagine that A is submitting screenshots from your screen and B is sending them to the clients. Only the last one matters and B is gonna go as fast as possible –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 14:52
    
So basically what you want is that running a new task will actually cancel all previous tasks ? For example if I sent at time 3 and the task from time 2 did not send yet then cancel it ? –  Aviram Segal Sep 16 '12 at 15:00
    
imagine that A is submitting screenshots from your screen and B is sending them to the clients. Only the last one matters and B is gonna go as fast as possible –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 15:02
    
Edited my answer –  Aviram Segal Sep 16 '12 at 15:23
    
nice, plenty of things to try to code, thanks a lot! –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 15:27

The most elegant way is using a message queue. A writes data to the queue as soon as it is available. B subscribes to the queue and is notified whenever new data is in. A message queue handles everything for you.

However you should be more explicit: should B be notified for each and every message? What happens if an update is lost?

share|improve this answer
    
actually I only need B to sent the latest data available, no notification needed (sorry, I should have written in in the post) so not sure the queue is the way to go. A LIFO queue, for instance would transmit the latest info first but eventually I'm gonna get the old data sent to the clients.. Other ideas? –  Emanuele Ronchi Sep 16 '12 at 14:38
    
So you don't need any queue at all. I'll update my answer –  Raffaele Sep 16 '12 at 14:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.