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I have a string:

s= "[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]"

and I need to convert that string into a list:

l= [7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]

the problem is, when I use list(s) I get this:

['[', '7', ',', ' ', '9', ',', ' ', '4', '1', ',', ' ', '[', '3', '2', ',', ' ', '6', '7', ']', ']']

I am using python 3.2

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What format is the string in? JSON? Python? Other? –  user1675187 Sep 16 '12 at 14:27
1  
The reason you get what you do is that strings are iterable, with their characters as the entries. If you pass list an iterable, it will give you a list containing the entries from the iterable. –  katrielalex Sep 16 '12 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do exactly what you asked for by using ast.literal_eval():

>>> ast.literal_eval("[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]")
[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]

However, you probably want to use a sane serialisation format like JSON in the first place, instead of relying on the string representation of Python objects. (As a side note, the string you have might even be JSON, since the JSON representation of this particular object would look identical to the Python string representation. Since you did not mention JSON, I'm assuming this is not what you used to get this string.)

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+1 Serialise the data properly. –  katrielalex Sep 16 '12 at 14:28
    
I am trying to do this because I'm sending the data as a string over a socket, is there a better way? –  Parker Hoyes Sep 16 '12 at 14:31
    
@ParkerHoyes: Yes, just any proper serialisation is better. Have a look at Python's json and pickle modules, to name two. –  Sven Marnach Sep 16 '12 at 14:38

Use the ast module, it has a handy .literal_eval() function:

import ast

l = ast.literal_eval(s)

On the python prompt:

>>> import ast
>>> s= "[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]"
>>> ast.literal_eval(s)
[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]
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You want to use ast.literal_eval:

import ast
s= "[7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]"
print ast.literal_eval(s)
# [7, 9, 41, [32, 67]]
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Use: package ast: function : literal_eval(node_or_string)

http://docs.python.org/library/ast.html#module-ast

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