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I was wondering if there was a way in C language to define #define like this:

#define something #define
something a 42
something b 42
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2  
Did you bother trying to compile this yourself first? – BSull Sep 16 '12 at 15:03
1  
It is reasonable to infer that yes, this code was tried and it doesn't work, but the question is whether there is some other way to achieve a similar result to what was hoped for. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 16 '12 at 16:20

No, it's not possible in C. Defining a macro in another macro is not allowed.

From C standard:

6.10.3.4 Rescanning and further replacement

3 The resulting completely macro-replaced preprocessing token sequence is not processed as a preprocessing directive even if it resembles one, but all pragma unary operator expressions within it are then processed as specified in 6.10.9 below.

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Note that the URL given is not actually even the most recent draft of the C11 standard. You should probably reference the PDF available from ANSI for 30 USD. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 16 '12 at 15:18
    
Quoted part is ok for this answer, but $30 is a lot for me :D – P.P. Sep 16 '12 at 15:21
1  
Think of it as an investment for the next ten years — it works out at under a cent a day. If you're not a full-time C programmer, then it is less crucial, but most computing text books cost that much. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 16 '12 at 15:55
    
@JonathanLeffler Any idea why the C11 Standard from the ANSI website is 30 USD while the version from the ISO website is more than 200 USD? iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/… – ouah Sep 16 '12 at 16:08
    
Different organizations charge different amounts. ANSI makes up in volume what it lacks in per unit price? For the C99 standard, there was also a book containing both the standard and the rationale, costing about $60. It was more expensive than the PDF from ANSI, but cheaper than the standard (paper or PDF, IIRC) from ISO itself. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 16 '12 at 16:17

No, there isn't. If the expansion of a macro generates something that looks like a preprocessor directive, it is not processed as one, leaving a # in the source code that is seen by the compiler proper, which will then object that the # is an unexpected token (syntax error).

ISO/IEC 9899:2011

6.10.3.4 Rescanning and further replacement

¶3 The resulting completely macro-replaced preprocessing token sequence is not processed as a preprocessing directive even if it resembles one, but all pragma unary operator expressions within it are then processed as specified in 6.10.9 below.

The 'pragma unary operator' referred to is the _Pragma() operator which takes a string literal.

The wording in C99 is very similar, and the wording is C89 is similar but doesn't mention the _Pragma operator because it didn't exist in C89.


You can find drafts of the C2011 standard at the Open Standard web site:

along with working papers, 'mailings' for the committee meetings, etc.

(JTC1 is Joint Technical Committee 1; SC22 is Standardization Committee 22 for programming languages; WG14 is Working Group 14, responsible for the C standard. WG21 is responsible for the C++ standard.)

You can obtain your own, personalized copy of the PDF of the standard from ANSI for 30 USD. I regard that as a necessary investment for any serious C programmer.

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1  
Could you provide a reference for that? – user1675187 Sep 16 '12 at 15:05

No. The preprocessor only does one pass, so in the end, the code that goes to the compiler includes a #define, which is a syntax error.

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If you want to define something based on the definition of other ,C provides #ifdef to achieve it

like:-

#define something
#ifdef something
#define a 42
#else
#define b 42
#endif
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