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I've got an abstract class like this

public abstract Stuff
{
    public abstract void doStuff();
}

Several classes are extending Stuff, overriding doStuff(). doStuff() in general performs totally different tasks for each implementation but shares a common part.

Whats the best way to implement this?

I don't want to write someting like:

public void doStuff()
{
    doTheCommonPart();
    ...
}

in every extending class.

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does it have to be an abstract class ? –  Thousand Sep 16 '12 at 15:47
    
no, generally not –  Simbi Sep 16 '12 at 15:50
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Either:

  1. Place the common code in a protected method in the Stuff class and call it from each implementation of doStuff; or

  2. Add the common code to your abstract Stuff class and call another abstract method.

E.g. (1)

public abstract Stuff  
{
    public abstract void doStuff();

    protected void commonCode() 
    {
      //...
    }
}

or (2)

public abstract Stuff
{
    public void doStuff() 
    {
      // Do the common stuff initially...
      // ...

      // Then call the subclass implementation
      doRealStuff();
    }

    public abstract void doRealStuff();
}
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You could use the Template Method Pattern:

public abstract Stuff
{
    public abstract void doStuff();

    public void doTheCommonPart() {
      // ...
    }

    // Template method
    public final void doIt() {
      doTheCommonPart();
      doStuff();
    }
}

Then, your client classes just have to call the template method doIt(). It will execute the common code part, as well as the concrete implementation of the abstract method doStuff().

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You can define it like this, which is similar to the template method design pattern:

public abstract Stuff
{
    public abstract void doSpecificStuff();

    public void doStuff()
    {
        doCommonStuff();
        doSpecificStuff();
    }
}
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