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I'm using Postgresql DB.

I want to perform a query against a numeric column in a table to find if the value starts with a particular number.

I currently have:

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE to_char(ID, '12345678') LIKE '2%'

However this returns an empty dataset (but there are values in the ID column which start with 2.

Many thanks

Steve

share|improve this question
    
the second argument for to_char is intended as a template. Only 0 and 9 are applicable to numbers. You could also use a plain cast: WHERE id::text LIKE '2%' –  wildplasser Sep 16 '12 at 16:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't laugh. As an alternative to the casts, you could use a range query, like:

SELECT * FROM mytable
WHERE id = 2
OR (id >=20 AND id < 30)
OR (id >=200 AND id < 300)
OR (id >=2000 AND id < 3000)
OR (id >=20000 AND id < 30000)
OR (id >=200000 AND id < 300000)
OR (id >=2000000 AND id < 3000000)
OR (id >=20000000 AND id < 30000000)
OR (id >=200000000 AND id < 300000000)
OR (id >=2000000000 AND id < 3000000000)
OR (id >=20000000000 AND id < 30000000000)
OR (id >=200000000000 AND id < 300000000000)
        -- ...
        ;

This could cause postgres to generate a much better query plan, because an index can be used (if present, which can be expected for an id field)

UPDATE: The query plans:

Bitmap Heap Scan on reservations  (cost=1838.15..13290.11 rows=110809 width=4012) (actual time=11.310..24.379 rows=111111 loops=1)
   Recheck Cond: ((id = 2) OR ((id >= 20) AND (id < 30)) OR ((id >= 200) AND (id < 300)) OR ((id >= 2000) AND (id < 3000)) OR ((id >= 20000) AND (id < 30000)) OR ((id >= 200000) AND (id < 300000)) OR ((id >= 2000000) AND (id < 3000000)) OR ((id >= 20000000) AND (id < 30000000)) OR ((id >= 200000000) AND (id < 300000000)) OR ((id >= 2000000000) AND (id < 3000000000::bigint)) OR ((id >= 20000000000::bigint) AND (id < 30000000000::bigint)) OR ((id >= 200000000000::bigint) AND (id < 300000000000::bigint)))
   ->  BitmapOr  (cost=1838.15..1838.15 rows=112192 width=0) (actual time=11.242..11.242 rows=0 loops=1)
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.005..0.005 rows=1 loops=1)
               Index Cond: (id = 2)
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.58 rows=10 width=0) (actual time=0.003..0.003 rows=10 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 20) AND (id < 30))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..2.52 rows=104 width=0) (actual time=0.013..0.013 rows=100 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 200) AND (id < 300))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..14.24 rows=1036 width=0) (actual time=0.110..0.110 rows=1000 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 2000) AND (id < 3000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..144.73 rows=10845 width=0) (actual time=1.050..1.050 rows=10000 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 20000) AND (id < 30000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1332.24 rows=100196 width=0) (actual time=10.013..10.013 rows=100000 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 200000) AND (id < 300000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.010..0.010 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 2000000) AND (id < 3000000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.001..0.001 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 20000000) AND (id < 30000000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.001..0.001 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 200000000) AND (id < 300000000))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.002..0.002 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 2000000000) AND (id < 3000000000::bigint))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.026..0.026 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 20000000000::bigint) AND (id < 30000000000::bigint))
         ->  Bitmap Index Scan on reservations_pkey  (cost=0.00..1.49 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=0.002..0.002 rows=0 loops=1)
               Index Cond: ((id >= 200000000000::bigint) AND (id < 300000000000::bigint))
 Total runtime: 28.720 ms
(28 rows)


 Seq Scan on reservations  (cost=0.00..19219.52 rows=4383 width=4012) (actual time=0.025..184.532 rows=111111 loops=1)
   Filter: ((id)::text ~~ '2%'::text)
 Total runtime: 189.100 ms
(3 rows)
share|improve this answer
    
This is particularly valuable if you think that all of your id values are in a single range -- the LIKE approach is a sure loser in that case. –  kgrittn Sep 16 '12 at 17:57
    
wildplasser, I must say this is a very good answer, thank you. Logically speaking I have no idea why I didn't figure this out myself, but I guess x heads are better than 1. :) I just wish I could +2 - one for the answer, one for the query plans. –  Steve Sep 17 '12 at 8:38

That's because the pattern for a number in TO_CHAR is either 9 (value with the specified number of digits) or 0 (value with leading zeros). Either use the following:

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE TRIM(to_char(ID, '99999999')) LIKE '2%'

Or cast the number to a char.

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This will return the leading digit:

floor(a/10.^(floor(log(a))))

Example:

select a from generate_series(1,1000) as a where 
    floor(a/10.^(floor(log(a)))) = 2;

If you have numbers which are smaller than one or less than zero you should filter them out (depending on what you want exactly).

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Handily, this expression is suitable for a functional index, so if the query runs often enough or is slow enough for an index to be worth the costs, you can add one. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 1:51

I found the answer:

SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE CAST (ID AS CHAR) LIKE '2%'

Steve

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2  
Be careful; this will work, but probably not for exactly the reason you think it will. CHAR without a length factor will always be a single character -- prove it to yourself by running SELECT CAST(23456 as CHAR); or similar. The statement in your answer is semantically exactly the same as SELECT * FROM myTable WHERE CAST (ID AS CHAR) = '2', so if you tried looking for a two-character prefix, you would get an unpleasant surprise. A cast to text would probably be less surprising. –  kgrittn Sep 16 '12 at 17:54
2  
Second the cast to text instead. You can also say text(id) instead of cast(id as text). Also if you do this you will want to index output of text(id) so that you can use an index. –  Chris Travers Sep 17 '12 at 6:52
    
Good points, thanks both –  Steve Sep 17 '12 at 8:39

You dont need the to_char, just id like '2%'.

share|improve this answer
2  
er, no. Error code 0, SQL state 42883: ERROR: operator does not exist: numeric ~~ unknown Hint: No operator matches the given name and argument type(s). You might need to add explicit type casts. Position: 42 –  Steve Sep 16 '12 at 16:17
    
pl/sql sorry ;) –  user1675905 Sep 16 '12 at 18:16
3  
@user1675905 Might be worth deleting that answer. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 1:52

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