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I just wrote a task queue in Python whose job is to limit the number of tasks that are run at one time. This is a little different than Queue.Queue because instead of limiting how many items can be in the queue, it limits how many can be taken out at one time. It still uses an unbounded Queue.Queue to do its job, but it relies on a Semaphore to limit the number of threads:

from Queue import Queue
from threading import BoundedSemaphore, Lock, Thread


class TaskQueue(object):
    """
    Queues tasks to be run in separate threads and limits the number
    concurrently running tasks.

    """

    def __init__(self, limit):
        """Initializes a new instance of a TaskQueue."""
        self.__semaphore = BoundedSemaphore(limit)
        self.__queue = Queue()
        self.__cancelled = False
        self.__lock = Lock()

    def enqueue(self, callback):
        """Indicates that the given callback should be ran."""
        self.__queue.put(callback)

    def start(self):
        """Tells the task queue to start running the queued tasks."""
        thread = Thread(target=self.__process_items)
        thread.start()

    def stop(self):
        self.__cancel()
        # prevent blocking on a semaphore.acquire
        self.__semaphore.release()
        # prevent blocking on a Queue.get
        self.__queue.put(lambda: None)

    def __cancel(self):
        print 'canceling'
        with self.__lock:
            self.__cancelled = True

    def __process_items(self):
        while True:
            # see if the queue has been stopped before blocking on acquire
            if self.__is_canceled():
                break

            self.__semaphore.acquire()

            # see if the queue has been stopped before blocking on get
            if self.__is_canceled():
                break

            callback = self.__queue.get()

            # see if the queue has been stopped before running the task
            if self.__is_canceled():
                break

            def runTask():
                try:
                    callback()
                finally:
                    self.__semaphore.release()

            thread = Thread(target=runTask)
            thread.start()
            self.__queue.task_done()

    def __is_canceled(self):
        with self.__lock:
            return self.__cancelled

The Python interpreter runs forever unless I explicitly stop the task queue. This is a lot more tricky than I thought it would be. If you look at the stop method, you'll see that I set a canceled flag, release the semaphore and put a no-op callback on the queue. The last two parts are necessary because the code could be blocking on the Semaphore or on the Queue. I basically have to force these to go through so that the loop has a chance to break out.

This code works. This class is useful when running a service that is trying to run thousands of tasks in parallel. In order to keep the machine running smoothly and to prevent the OS from screaming about too many active threads, this code will limit the number of threads living at any one time.

I have written a similar chunk of code in C# before. What made that code particular cut 'n' dry was that .NET has something called a CancellationToken that just about every threading class uses. Any time there is a blocking operation, that operation takes an optional token. If the parent task is ever canceled, any child tasks blocking with that token will be immediately canceled, as well. This seems like a much cleaner way to exit than to "fake it" by releasing semaphores or putting values in a queue.

I was wondering if there was an equivalent way of doing this in Python? I definitely want to be using threads instead of something like asynchronous events. I am wondering if there is a way to achieve the same thing using two Queue.Queues where one is has a max size and the other doesn't - but I'm still not sure how to handle cancellation.

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Double underscores are not the pythonic way of specifying privacy. A single underscore is. Double underscores cause name mangling. See here: docs.python.org/3/tutorial/… –  pillmuncher Feb 17 at 0:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You seem to be creating a new thread for each task from the queue. This is wasteful in itself, and also leads you to the problem of how to limit the number of threads.

Instead, a common approach is to create a fixed number of worker threads and let them freely pull tasks from the queue. To cancel the queue, you can clear it and let the workers stay alive in anticipation of future work.

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The problem with keeping threads alive is that it keeps the Python process alive forever. This makes it hard to write unit tests. –  Travis Parks Sep 17 '12 at 1:35
1  
You can use daemon threads, they don't keep the process alive. –  Janne Karila Sep 17 '12 at 6:20

I think your code can be simplified by using poisoning and Thread.join():

from Queue import Queue
from threading import Thread

poison = object()

class TaskQueue(object):

    def __init__(self, limit):
        def process_items():
            while True:
                callback = self._queue.get()
                if callback is poison:
                    break
                try:
                    callback()
                except:
                    pass
                finally:
                    self._queue.task_done()
        self._workers = [Thread(target=process_items) for _ in range(limit)]
        self._queue = Queue()

    def enqueue(self, callback):
        self._queue.put(callback)

    def start(self):
        for worker in self._workers:
            worker.start()

    def stop(self):
        for worker in self._workers:
            self._queue.put(poison)
        while self._workers:
            self._workers.pop().join()

Untested.

I removed the comments, for brevity.

Also, in this version process_items() is truly private.

BTW: The whole point of the Queue module is to free you from the dreaded locking and event stuff.

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I took Janne Karila's advice and created a thread pool. This eliminated the need for a semaphore. The problem is if you ever expect the queue to go away, you have to stop the worker threads from running (just a variation of what I did before). The new code is fairly similar:

class TaskQueue(object):
    """
    Queues tasks to be run in separate threads and limits the number
    concurrently running tasks.

    """

    def __init__(self, limit):
        """Initializes a new instance of a TaskQueue."""
        self.__workers = []
        for _ in range(limit):
            worker = Thread(target=self.__process_items)
            self.__workers.append(worker)
        self.__queue = Queue()
        self.__cancelled = False
        self.__lock = Lock()
        self.__event = Event()

    def enqueue(self, callback):
        """Indicates that the given callback should be ran."""
        self.__queue.put(callback)

    def start(self):
        """Tells the task queue to start running the queued tasks."""
        for worker in self.__workers:
            worker.start()

    def stop(self):
        """
        Stops the queue from processing anymore tasks. Any actively running
        tasks will run to completion.

        """
        self.__cancel()
        # prevent blocking on a Queue.get
        for _ in range(len(self.__workers)):
            self.__queue.put(lambda: None)
            self.__event.wait()

    def __cancel(self):
        with self.__lock:
            self.__queue.queue.clear()
            self.__cancelled = True

    def __process_items(self):
        while True:
            callback = self.__queue.get()

            # see if the queue has been stopped before running the task
            if self.__is_canceled():
                break

            try:
                callback()
            except:
                pass
            finally:
                self.__queue.task_done()
        self.__event.set()

    def __is_canceled(self):
        with self.__lock:
            return self.__cancelled

If you look carefully, I had to do some accounting to kill off the workers. I basically wait on an Event for as many times as there are workers. I clear the underlying queue to prevent workers from being cancelled any other way. I also wait after pumping each bogus value into the queue, so only one worker can cancel out at a time.

I've ran some tests on this and it appears to be working. It would still be nice to eliminate the need for bogus values.

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't use double undescores the way you do. They're for name mangling, not to enforce privacy. For that you should use single underscores. That signals to other programmers: do not touch unless you know what you're doing! It won't prevent them from touching, though, but double underscores won't either, since they can be accessed by their mangled names. –  pillmuncher Sep 17 '12 at 2:23

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