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I need a bit of help to understand how python initialising works. I have a class (Bar) with another class (Foo) as a field/variable. When I try to initialise this variable directly in Bar (not in the class __init__) all instances of Bar will point to the same Foo. But if I have an __init__ method, as in Bar2, each Bar2 instance will have a unique Foo instance. What is happening here?

class Foo():
    number = 0

class Bar():
    foo = Foo()

class Bar2():
    foo = None

    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = Foo()

first = Bar()
second = Bar()

print "Bar"
print first
print second
print first.foo
print second.foo

first = Bar2()
second = Bar2()

print "\nBar2"
print first
print second
print first.foo
print second.foo

The output will for example be:

Bar
<\__main__.Bar instance at 0x025B2AF8>
<\__main__.Bar instance at 0x025B2B20>
<\__main__.Foo instance at 0x004A3AA8>
<\__main__.Foo instance at 0x004A3AA8>

Bar2
<\__main__.Bar2 instance at 0x025B2B48>
<\__main__.Bar2 instance at 0x025B2AF8>
<\__main__.Foo instance at 0x025B2B70>
<\__main__.Foo instance at 0x025B2B98>

Using Bar both instances will refer to the same Foo instance. Why?

Edit: Corrected the error with printing first.foo twice for Bar. The resulting behaviour is still as seen in the output.

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Do not write class Foo(): in Python 2.x. That will create an old style class. You almost certainly don't want that. Instead, you want a new style class. For this, write class Foo(object):. – pillmuncher Sep 16 '12 at 20:34
    
I didn't know about that, thanks for point that out too me. I actually should have known, since the change occurred before my first meeting with Python. – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 16 '12 at 22:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Python is a dynamic language. In static languages like Java, the compiler reads the code, finds the class definitions, figures out if they are proper and generates some code accordingly. In python, a class definition (or a function definition) is just a statement as any other, like an assignment to a variable. The syntax is just a bit different.

When defining a class, the interpreter runs the class definition, i.e., it runs all the code after the class line. If it finds function definitions, it runs them as well, that is defines the functions and binds them to the function name. Since class and function definitions are statements as any other assignment, you can also have them in many places. For example like following:

def foo():
  class A: pass
  a = A()
  a.msg = "Hello"
  return a

Because python is duck typed (if it quacks like a duck and looks like one, it is one), users of the function foo don't even have to know what the class is called, they simply need to know that foo returns an object with a member msg. You would use it like this:

a = foo()
print a.msg

So in your example, when the definition of Bar is executed, the classes statements are run including the creation of the Foo object. When the definition of Bar2 is executed, the classes statements are run among them the definition of a function called init. Python uses this as the name of the function to call, when an object is created (after calling another function __new__, but that's besides the point).

So again, the class definition (code that is inside the class, where Bar creates the Foo object) is run only once when the class is introduced. __init__ is called again and again every time a new object is made, so in Bar2 the creation of a Foo is done again and again as well.

The "foo = None" thing as far as I can tell is superfluous, it's not really needed. In python you can add instance variables from anywhere, even from outside the class and definitely from inside __init__.

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You are correct that the foo = None is unnecessary. I'll leave it in the example, since I put it there in the first place. I don't quite see that you explain why I see this behaviour though. – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 16 '12 at 21:51
    
I added clarification. – Daniel Landau Sep 17 '12 at 8:35
    
Easier to understand now, thanks. – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 17 '12 at 11:43

Bar.foo is a class variable. It is initialised once when the class is created.

(Note that your code als print first.foo twice, so no wonder the output is the same.)

share|improve this answer
    
Fixed the error in the example, still same behaviour. – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 16 '12 at 21:49
    
@HåkonK.Olafsen: Yes, because it's a class variable. It's stored on the class, not on the individual instances. The comment about the error was only a side note, that's why I put it in parentheses. – Sven Marnach Sep 16 '12 at 22:31
    
That was easier to understand. Thanks. – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 17 '12 at 11:42
first = Bar()
second = Bar()

print "Bar"
print first
print second
print first.foo
print first.foo

Here, you are printing first.foo twice, that's why the same foo object is printed.

first = Bar2()
second = Bar2()

print "\nBar2"
print first
print second
print first.foo
print second.foo

Here, foo is a static variable in class Bar2, that's why both objects point to the same foo object, constructed with the construction of second.

class Bar2():
 foo = None

 def __init__(self):
     self.foo = Foo()

class Bar():
 def __init__(self):
   self.foo = Foo()

In Bar2, all objects of Bar2, will have the foo object pointing to the same object constructed at the construction of the last constructed object of Bar2.

In Bar, all foo objects will be unique for every object of Bar, unless otherwise stated.

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My example had a small mistake with the printing of first.foo, but my real code didn't, that's how I found this behaviour. I think you might have switch around on Bar and Bar2 in your answer. When I run my updated example (correct printing) the output is still the same. Is it Bar that creates a static version of Foo? – Håkon K. Olafsen Sep 16 '12 at 21:56

Classes are objects too, and they have their own set of variables. Not only that, but when Python can't find a variable in the object, it looks within the class to see if it can find it there, and that's what it uses. Since the class is shared between all the objects of that class, so are the variables within that class.

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