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I'm writing in plain C and I have an issue about how to free a pointer to a structure. I have a structure declared in the following way

typedef struct _RealMatrix {
    uint nRows;
    uint nCols;
    real **matrix;
} RealMatrix;

Now, every time I need it I use the following code to allocate it

RealMatrix *realMatrixAlloc(uint n, uint m) {
    loop_var(i);
    RealMatrix *matrix;

    matrix = malloc(sizeof(RealMatrix));
    errcheck(matrix, "Unable to create real matrix structure.");

    matrix->nRows = n;
    matrix->nCols = m;
    matrix->matrix = malloc(n*sizeof(real *));
    matrix->matrix[0] = malloc(n*m*sizeof(real));
    errcheck(matrix->matrix && matrix->matrix[0], "Unable to get requested memory for real matrix of dimensions: (%u, %u).", n, m);

    f_i(i < n) matrix->matrix[i] = matrix->matrix[0] + i*m;

    return matrix;
}

where errcheck() is a allocation checking macro. Everything works just fine until I try to deallocate it calling

freeRealMatrix(&myRealMatrix);

which will

free((*ma)->matrix[0]),
free((*ma)->matrix)
free(*ma).
*ma = NULL;

with suitable checks to avoid following any NULL pointer. Here "ma" is the pointer TO THE POINTER to the structure: the function declaration reads

void freeRealMatrix(RealMatrix **ma);

However when this function returns I find out that "myRealMatrix" is still addressing an existing structure, which was not deallocated as I expected by free(*ma). On the other hand the array (*ma)->matrix has been successfully deallocated.

Any ideas about what am I doing wrong? This is driving me crazy... Thanks in advance!

UPDATE:

I copied the code and executed in a brand new program... It works precisely as expected. I noticed that the address contained in "myRealMatrix" isn't the same as the address pointed by *ma. Well... Sort of: it seems truncated! Instead of being 0x106a50 it is just 0x106a and no more. The last two hex digits are missing every time!

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However when this function returns I find out that "myRealMatrix" is still addressing an existing structure How? –  arrowdodger Sep 16 '12 at 17:40
4  
free doesn't do anything to the memory you freed except return it for later use by your program - in particular there's no reason you would see any difference in the memory you returned. You're just not allowed to use it anymore. What are you expecting to change? –  Carl Norum Sep 16 '12 at 17:41
2  
And you don't need to check for NULL when calling free - it's safe to call free(0). You should make sure you don't try to dereference one though - reading your question I'm not sure which you mean. –  Carl Norum Sep 16 '12 at 17:42
    
Sorry, forgot to say: I would expect that "myRealMatrix" would be turned to NULL when the line *ma = NULL is executed (which is right after the free(*ma)). Instead "myRealMatrix" points to the same address as before and the nRows and nCols values are the same. That seems very strange to me... –  gianluca Sep 16 '12 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

After a free, your pointer continues to contain the address of the freed location. You can not continue addressing this location though. It can be used for something else.

You may want to explicitly set it to NULL after the third free statement:

*ma = NULL;
share|improve this answer
    
@gianluca - Carl Norum is correct: "free doesn't do anything to the memory you freed except return it for later use by your program - in particular there's no reason you would see any difference in the memory you returned.". Explicitly setting pointers to NULL after each of your three "free()" is a Good Idea. After the final, *ma = NULL;, your caller should see myRealMatrix == NULL. –  paulsm4 Sep 16 '12 at 17:54
    
Yes, I would expect that... However, even after *ma = NULL is executed I see no change in myRealMatrix value. Mmm, I must have messed up something in a VERY bad way... –  gianluca Sep 16 '12 at 18:00
    
Ok, I copied the code and executed in a brand new program... It works precisely as expected. I noticed that the address contained in "myRealMatrix" isn't the same as the address pointed by *ma. Well... Sort of: it seems truncated! Instead of being 0x106a50 it is just 0x106a and no more. The last two hex digits are missing every time! –  gianluca Sep 16 '12 at 18:10

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