Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to learn the use of "if" and "for" in R. As a simple example I set up the data frame

V1<-c(3,2,2,4,5)
V2<-c(3,7,3,5,2)
V3<-c(5,2,5,7,5)
V4<-c(1,1,2,3,4)
V5<-c(1,2,6,7,5)
DF2<-data.frame(V1=V1,V2=V2,V3=V3,V4=V4,V5=V5)
DF2
  V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
1  3  3  5  1  1
2  2  7  2  1  2
3  2  3  5  2  6 
4  4  5  7  3  7
5  5  2  5  4  5

My goal was to set up an if statement that would remove a column in a row based on a row value. As an example:

If V1 = 5, drop column V5
If V1 = 4, drop column V4 & V5

so according to these rules my data frame would end up looking like this

  V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
1  3  3  5  1  1
2  2  7  2  1  2
3  2  3  5  2  6 
4  4  5  7  
5  5  2  5  4  

My first thought was I could write a simple if statement to do this:

if(DF2$V1==5){
    DF2[-5]
}else if(DF2$V1==4){
    DF2[-4:5]
}

But I got an error that "if" conditional statements can not be >1. So I thought if I wrote a "for" loop, it would allow the if statement to go row by row, allowing the conditional statement to be ==1.

for(i in 1:length(DF2)){
if(DF2$V1==5){
    DF2[-5]
}else if(DF2$V1==4){
    DF2[-4]
}
} 

But now I get the same error, just x10. So I'm obviously barking up the same tree. So my question would be- what is the best way to deal with my original data frame question? And if not with some sort of if or for loop answer, why do I get this error?

share|improve this question
3  
Tyler's answer is much better in my opinion. –  Dason Sep 16 '12 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote -4 down vote accepted

Ok, without digging too much in details, I think you should use a for to iterate over the data frame, and an if to perform the deletion. On the other hand, you cant have a data frame with different row sizes, so it would make more sense to replace the desired entries with NaN:

V1<-c(3,2,2,4,5)
V2<-c(3,7,3,5,2)
V3<-c(5,2,5,7,5)
V4<-c(1,1,2,3,4)
V5<-c(1,2,6,7,5)
DF2<-data.frame(V1=V1,V2=V2,V3=V3,V4=V4,V5=V5)

'The data frame, before replacing values:'; DF2
for(i in seq(1,nrow(DF2))) {
  if(DF2$V1[i] == 5) {
    DF2[i,5] <- NaN
  } else if(DF2$V1[i] == 4) {
    DF2[i,4] <- NaN
    DF2[i,5] <- NaN
  }
}

'The data frame, after replacing values:'; DF2

When you run this script you get the following output:

> V1<-c(3,2,2,4,5)
> V2<-c(3,7,3,5,2)
> V3<-c(5,2,5,7,5)
> V4<-c(1,1,2,3,4)
> V5<-c(1,2,6,7,5)
> DF2<-data.frame(V1=V1,V2=V2,V3=V3,V4=V4,V5=V5)
> 
> 'The data frame, before replacing values:'; DF2
[1] "The data frame, before replacing values:"
  V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
1  3  3  5  1  1
2  2  7  2  1  2
3  2  3  5  2  6
4  4  5  7  3  7
5  5  2  5  4  5
> for(i in seq(1,nrow(DF2))) {
+   if(DF2$V1[i] == 5) {
+     DF2[i,5] <- NaN
+   } else if(DF2$V1[i] == 4) {
+     DF2[i,4] <- NaN
+     DF2[i,5] <- NaN
+   }
+ }
> 
> 'The data frame, after replacing values:'; DF2
[1] "The data frame, after replacing values:"
  V1 V2 V3  V4  V5
1  3  3  5   1   1
2  2  7  2   1   2
3  2  3  5   2   6
4  4  5  7 NaN NaN
5  5  2  5   4 NaN

Just in case, there's an excelent R reference site I use: statmethods.net

Hope this helps you

share|improve this answer
7  
That is going to be an extremely inefficient approach. –  BondedDust Sep 16 '12 at 18:32
    
Thanks, that's a great answer. If I can ask two clarifying questions. Is the letter "i" as in "for(i in .....)" meaningful, or is it just a standard letter people use? It looks like the "i" in the line "DF2[i,4] <-Nan" is used to designate the row in the df. But in the line "if(DF2$V1[1] ==5), does "i" mean something else, or is it designating all rows? –  Vinterwoo Sep 16 '12 at 18:55
2  
@DWin is correct. See these benchmarks. –  Ananda Mahto Sep 16 '12 at 20:08
3  
@Barranka (and Vinterwoo) I tested this code on a dataframe that had 1000 reps of lines 1:5 and it was 100 times slower than Tyler code. If all you want to work on are toy problems you probably won't notice the difference, but as soon as you try to scale up your work to real problems you will be wasting a lot to time this way. –  BondedDust Sep 16 '12 at 20:11
3  
-1 This is not the way to do this. Your's is inefficient and poor R code because you are treating every comparison as a single operation. R is incredibly inefficient for that type of "scalar" operation as it was always designed to work efficiently on vectors. Furthermore, it is very verbose compared to Tyler's answer. –  Gavin Simpson Sep 17 '12 at 7:42

This isn't going to help you use if because you shouldn't use if here but vectorize the solution. Also you really can't just put holes in a data frame because by definition a data frame is a list of equal length vectors. I suppose you could make it into a character vector and replace the pieces you want with "" but that probably isn't useful. Another approach is to use print and print it as a matrix and tell it not to show NAs or missing values.

Long story short:

  1. vectorize
  2. replace with NA not blank
  3. to print NAs as blank turn it to a matrix and use arguments for the print function

Here it is...

DF2[DF2$V1==5, 5] <- NA
DF2[DF2$V1==4, 4:5] <- NA
DF2

#If you want blanks printed.
M1 <- as.matrix(DF2)
rownames(M1) <- 1:nrow(M1)
print(M1, na.print="", quote=FALSE)
share|improve this answer
    
excellent point. Thanks! –  Vinterwoo Sep 16 '12 at 18:34

I would honestly think that @Tyler's approach is more efficient---it's certainly a more typical approach for regular R users---but if you're fixated on using if, just think through what you're doing:

  • You're processing a data.frame row by row.
  • The apply() function in R allows you to specify your MARGIN as either 1 (for apply a function by row) or 2 (for apply a function by column).
  • Thus, you can set your conditions as a "function" for apply() to use on each row as follows.

    t(apply(DF2, 1, function(x) { if(x[1] == 5) x[5] <- NA;
                                  if(x[1] == 4) x[4:5] <- NA;
                                  x} ))
    #      V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
    # [1,]  3  3  5  1  1
    # [2,]  2  7  2  1  2
    # [3,]  2  3  5  2  6
    # [4,]  4  5  7 NA NA
    # [5,]  5  2  5  4 NA
    

The t is just to transpose the output in the final step.

Benchmarks

The question of efficiency has been raised in some of the comments. In cases of small datasets, I would doubt there would be much difference in efficiency among any of the answers, so I did some benchmarks with a larger (but still very small) dataset.

Here's the dataset:

set.seed(1)
DF2 = data.frame(V1 = sample(5, 1000, replace = TRUE),
                 V2 = sample(5, 1000, replace = TRUE),
                 V3 = sample(5, 1000, replace = TRUE),
                 V4 = sample(5, 1000, replace = TRUE),
                 V5 = sample(5, 1000, replace = TRUE))

And here is the code used to run the benchmark and the results. Here, we can easily see that Tyler's approach is much faster than using if (...) else if (...).

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(
  Barranka = {
    for(i in seq(1,nrow(DF2))) {
      if(DF2$V1[i] == 5) {
        DF2[i,5] <- NaN
      } else if(DF2$V1[i] == 4) {
        DF2[i,4] <- NaN
        DF2[i,5] <- NaN
      }
    }},
  Tyler = {
    DF2[DF2$V1==5, 5] <- NA
    DF2[DF2$V1==4, 4:5] <- NA },
  mrdwab = {
    t(apply(DF2, 1, function(x) { if(x[1] == 5) x[5] <- NA;
                                  if(x[1] == 4) x[4:5] <- NA;
                                   x })) },
columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"), 
order = "relative")
#       test replications elapsed relative
# 2    Tyler          100   0.378    1.000
# 3   mrdwab          100   2.072    5.481
# 1 Barranka          100  11.885   31.442

When I tried changing the number of rows to 100000, using system.time(), Tyler's approach and mine were able to do what was necessary without any problem. Tyler's elapsed time was 0.315 seconds, mine was 2.773 seconds, and Barranka's was 807.446 seconds (13+ minutes!). That's a huge difference.

If anyone knows a better way to benchmark, please feel free to edit and update this post.

Note: This is not here to criticize anyone's particular approach, but to justify some of the statements that have been made in the comments. One thing I love (and hate) about R is that there is almost always more than one way to do something.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.