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Sometimes, I want to get the escaped string representation of a string. In this case, I want to print output to the console, but the output can include any characters (tab, NL, CR, etc.) and I'd rather output the escape sequences for these to make it more readable (and on one line).

For example escape("hello\tworld\n") == "hello\\tworld\\n"

Am I going to have to write my own function for this? I suspect I do.

Thanks in advance for your answer.

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1  
Yes, you have to write your own function. It's not very hard. –  Pete Becker Sep 16 '12 at 19:02
    
No, @Pete Becker, it's not too hard. But it can be a little unsightly. As it is, there is no find/replace (or find/replace all) function in standard C/C++ libraries. And I would have to escape \a, \b, \f, \n, \r, \t, \v (am I forgetting any?). I never mentioned escaping non-printable characters, but I might want to do that too, in which case I guess I 'd use \x-- for those ranges. –  Paul Draper Nov 23 '12 at 20:02
    
FYI, there is something like this for Java in Apache's libraries. org.apache.commons.lang.StringEscapeUtils.escapeJava –  Paul Draper Mar 1 '13 at 4:33

2 Answers 2

In C++ prior to C++11, you need to do this yourself. In C++11, there is a "raw string" type that would preserve everything. See for example: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B11

A raw string is represented by R"<delim>(<text>)<delim>" Where <delim> can be a string sequence up to 16 characters (including empty string). Note there are some limitations on the characters in <delim> but that should not be a problem as you want it readable anyway.

So your example would be:

char const* str = R"(hello\tworld\n)";
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Thanks you. My new fact of the day :-) –  Loki Astari Sep 16 '12 at 20:19
1  
Um, no, that goes the opposite way from the example. According to the question, the goal is to "output the escape sequences ... to make it more readable." So the output (presumably to cout, etc.) should be hello\tworld\n, and the proposed escape function adds backslashes. –  Pete Becker Sep 16 '12 at 20:31
    
Yes, @PeteBecker is right. Given a cstring or std::string, I want to get the escaped representation of that. Kevin's idea is close, except it only deals with string <u>literals</u>. –  Paul Draper Sep 18 '12 at 17:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is one stream-based solution (in case a stream turns out to be the intended destination, you can modify accordingly) that I wrote:

std::string escape(std::string const &str) {
    std::ostringstream result;
    for (string::const_iterator it = str.begin(); it != str.end(); it++) {
        if (' ' <= *it && *it <= '~') {
            result << *it;
        } else {
            result << "\\x" << std::setw(2) << std::hex << std::setfill('0') << *it;
        }
    }
    return result.str();
}

and here is another that uses the same common non-printable escape codes as C/C++:

std::string escape(std::string const &str) {
    std::ostringstream result;
    for (string::const_iterator it = str.begin(); it != str.end(); it++) {
        if (' ' <= *it && *it <= '~') {
            result << *it;
        } else {
            switch (*it) {
            case '\a':
                result << "\\a";
                break;
            case '\b':
                result << "\\b";
                break;
            case '\f':
                result << "\\f";
                break;
            case '\n':
                result << "\\n";
                break;
            case '\r':
                result << "\\r";
                break;
            case '\t':
                result << "\\t";
                break;
            case '\v':
                result << "\\v";
                break;
            default:
                result << "\\x" << std::setw(2) << std::hex << std::setfill('0') << *it;
        }
    }
    return result.str();
}
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