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This code works in all browsers except for IE. Anything I can do to add support for it?

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
  var currentArrayNum = 2;
  $('#names').on({
    blur: function() {
        currentArrayNum += 1;
        var name = $("<p><input class='input' type='text' name='guests[]' value='' /></p>");

        var nullFields = 0;
        $(this).closest('div#names').find('input.input').each(function(){
            if($(this).val() == ""){
                nullFields++;
            }
        });
        console.log(nullFields);

        if(nullFields <= 1){
          $('#names').append(name.fadeIn(500));
          $('#leftbox').scrollTop($('#leftbox')[0].scrollHeight);
        }
    }
}, 'input');
 });
</script>

It should mean that extra input fields are added. You can see it in action (in FF, Chrome, Safari etc) under 'Enter names for the guestlist' here.

EDIT

Tested in IE9 but doesn't work for me.

I should also ask if there's a way of testing in different versions of IE (and othe browsers) on a Mac?

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1  
In what version(s) of internet explorer are you having the problem? edit it works fine for me in IE9. –  Pointy Sep 16 '12 at 19:16
    
What isn't happening in IE? And any specific version(s) you're testing on? –  Ian Sep 16 '12 at 19:16
    
It also works in IE8 (though the formatting is a little off) –  Pointy Sep 16 '12 at 19:19
    
Well one problem is that your page is going to be really weird for IE, because those conditional comments will give you two <html> tags. That'll leave the <script> tags that come before those in some weird state, which could easily confuse older versions of IE. You should just use HTML5 Boilerplate as your guide. –  Pointy Sep 16 '12 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

Note that in some (all?) versions of IE, you need to have developer ("F12") tools open for console.log to work, otherwise console is undefined and so console.log() throws an error.

That may be your issue.

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I agree. Upvoted. –  J. Bruni Sep 16 '12 at 19:15
1  
if (console) console.log(...); –  Russ Cam Sep 16 '12 at 19:16
1  
You could add how to test for it: if ('console' in window) { /* console.log is supported */ } –  Johan Sep 16 '12 at 19:17
    
@RussCam I believe that would throw an error where console is not defined. Should be if(window.console) –  Johan Sep 16 '12 at 19:19
    
@Johan right you are :) –  Russ Cam Sep 16 '12 at 19:35

I know your question is about a week old but Im not sure if you found a solution or the reason for the cross-browser issues. I was recently working on a custom modal pop up window and I needed to find my scrollTop. Trust me, I love jQuery to death and I use it everyday but sometimes you need to use some good ol' javaScript. I.E accesses the body of the DOM differently than say Chrome or FF.

//I.E.
document.documentElement.scrollTop;

//Chrome, FF, etc.
document.body.scrollTop;

Basically, create a script that detects the user's browser and then include a conditional statement that will assign the value the appropriate way.

//Detect Browser
if (clientBrowser == "IE") {

    currTopPos = document.documentElement.scrollTop;
} else {

    currTopPos = document.body.scrollTop;
}

I created a script for one of the current projects Im working on, let me know if you would like to take a look at it.

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