Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In my experience CONSTRAINED_RESIZE_POLICY is broken if the TableView contains some fixed width columns unless I am doing something wrong here:

public class JavaFX2Sandbox extends Application
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Application.launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage stage) throws Exception
    {
        StackPane root = new StackPane();
        root.autosize();
        Scene scene = new Scene(root);

        stage.setScene(scene);
        stage.show();

        configureTable(root);
    }

    public static class Person
    {
        public Person(String firstName, String lastName)
        {
            this.fixedValue = "Dr.";
            this.firstName = firstName;
            this.lastName = lastName;
        }
        public String fixedValue;
        public String firstName;
        public String  lastName;
    }

    private static class CellValueFactory<T> implements Callback<TableColumn.CellDataFeatures<T, Object>, ObservableValue<Object>>
    {
        private String mFieldName;

        public CellValueFactory(String fieldName)
        {
            mFieldName = fieldName;
        }

        @Override
        public ObservableValue call(TableColumn.CellDataFeatures<T, Object> p)
        {
            try
            {
                if (p == null)
                {
                    return new SimpleObjectProperty(null);
                }
                Object o = p.getValue();
                if (o == null)
                {
                    return new SimpleObjectProperty(null);
                }
                Object fieldVal = o.getClass().getField(mFieldName).get(o);
                if (fieldVal == null)
                {
                    return new SimpleObjectProperty(null);
                }

                return new SimpleObjectProperty(fieldVal);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                return new SimpleObjectProperty(ex);
            }
        }
    }
    private void configureTable(StackPane root)
    {

        TableView<Person> table = new TableView<>();
        table.setColumnResizePolicy(TableView.CONSTRAINED_RESIZE_POLICY);

        ArrayList<Person> teamMembers = new ArrayList<>();
        teamMembers.add(new Person("John", "Big"));
        teamMembers.add(new Person("Frank", "Small"));

        TableColumn col0 = new TableColumn("fixed-width");
        col0.setResizable(false);
        col0.setCellValueFactory(new CellValueFactory("fixedValue"));
        TableColumn col1 = new TableColumn("First Name");
        col1.setCellValueFactory(new CellValueFactory("firstName"));
        TableColumn col2 = new TableColumn("Last Name");
        col2.setCellValueFactory(new CellValueFactory("lastName"));
        table.getColumns().setAll(col0, col1, col2);
        table.setItems(FXCollections.observableList(teamMembers));

        root.getChildren().add(table);
    }
}

So I started to implement my own resize policy which behaves slightly differently from CONSTRAINED_RESIZE_POLICY but I like mine better :-). It is all okay except for the sum of the widths of the columns do not add up to the width of the TableView.

Here is the implementation of my resize policy class:

static class ColumnResizePolicy implements Callback<TableView.ResizeFeatures, Boolean>
{
    double mTVWidth;

    @Override
    public Boolean call(ResizeFeatures arg0)
    {
        TableView tv = arg0.getTable();
        Double tvWidth = tv.widthProperty().getValue();
        if (tvWidth == null || tvWidth <= 0.0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (mTVWidth != tvWidth && arg0.getColumn() == null)
        {
            mTVWidth = tvWidth;

            int numColsToSize = 0;
            double fixedColumnsWidths = 0;
            for (TableColumn col : new ArrayList<TableColumn>(tv.getColumns()))
            {
                if (col.isResizable() && col.isVisible())
                {
                    ++numColsToSize;
                }
                else if (col.isVisible())
                {
                    fixedColumnsWidths += col.getWidth();
                }
            }

            if (numColsToSize == 0)
                return TableView.UNCONSTRAINED_RESIZE_POLICY.call(arg0);

            TableColumn lastCol = null;
            for (TableColumn col : new ArrayList<TableColumn>(tv.getColumns()))
            {
                if (col.isResizable() && col.isVisible())
                {
                    double newWidth = (tvWidth - fixedColumnsWidths) / numColsToSize;
                    col.setPrefWidth(newWidth);
                    lastCol = col;
                }
            }
            if (lastCol != null)
            {
                lastCol.setPrefWidth(lastCol.getPrefWidth()-2);
            }

            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return TableView.UNCONSTRAINED_RESIZE_POLICY.call(arg0);
        }
    }
}

And my question (ironically after this long post) is about number 2 in this line:

lastCol.setPrefWidth(lastCol.getPrefWidth()-2);

I assume that the table width gives back the outer width including the border, hence the difference, but how do I get the inner width?

share|improve this question
    
Possibly related: stackoverflow.com/questions/10716811/… –  assylias Sep 16 '12 at 21:01

2 Answers 2

Try next:

 double borderWidth = table.getBoundsInLocal().getWidth() - table.getWidth()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the idea. Unfortunately table.getBoundsInLocal() returns table.getWidth()-1 (at least in my case) which means that getBoundsInLocal() is not the function I am looking for since in my case the magic number is 2 :-) –  bjdodo Sep 17 '12 at 23:38
    
After thinking a bit more, based on your definition it does work. Since borderwidth=table.getBoundsInLocal().getWidth() - table.getWidth(), which is 1, and there are 2 borders, one on the left and one on the right, I'd need to multiply borderwidth by 2 so I'd get my magic number, 2. Simple, but makes me feel uncomfortable, I'd expect an API to expose this width in a more straightforward way. –  bjdodo Sep 18 '12 at 0:05

Have you tried getting the width of the place holder node?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, unfortunately getPlaceholder() returns null. –  bjdodo Sep 18 '12 at 19:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.