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Having the following unions:

union {double first_d; uint64 first;};
union {double second_d; uint64 second;};
...
first_d = <a double value>
second_d = <a double value>

Does the output of following comparisons:

if(first_d > second_d)
    // CASE 1 OUTPUT
else if(first_d < second_d)
    // CASE 2 OUTPUT
else
    // CASE 3 OUTPUT

always the same for the following?

if(first> second)
    // CASE 1' OUTPUT
else if(first < second)
    // CASE 2' OUTPUT
else
    // CASE 3' OUTPUT
share|improve this question
1  
Floating-point representations and integer representations can't be compared using >, < for the other (as an answer that was here said). If you're willing to ignore NaN and infinity, though, you can compare equality this way. – imallett Sep 16 '12 at 21:47
    
Ignoring NaN and infinity why doesn't it work? Considering the representation of doubles, |sign||exponent|mantissa|, if assigned double is positive doesn't it work? Moreover, handling the negative doubles would be easy by checking the first bit of the uint64 and reversing the directions of comparisons. Is that right? – polerto Sep 16 '12 at 21:52
1  
@fireant With the exception of NaN, INF, and possibly the sign bit, yes floating-point comparisons are consistent with integer comparisons. The representation was intentionally designed that way to make the hardware simpler. – Mysticial Sep 16 '12 at 21:55
    
@Mysticial: That's true (I believe) for the IEEE floating-point representations. It may or may not be true for other floating-point representations. (Note that representations other than IEEE are becoming rarer over time.) – Keith Thompson Sep 16 '12 at 22:04
    
@KeithThompson Yes, I was referring specifically to the IEEE representations. Though you're right that it's become so common now that we just implicitly assume IEEE by default. – Mysticial Sep 16 '12 at 22:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nope. Here's a counter-example using NaNs:

int main()
{

    union {double first_d; uint64 first;};
    union {double second_d; uint64 second;};

    first  = 0x7ff8000000000001;
    second = 0x7ff8000000000002;

    if(first_d > second_d)
        printf("greater\n");
    else if(first_d < second_d)
        printf("less\n");
    else
        printf("other\n");

    if(first > second)
        printf("greater\n");
    else if(first < second)
        printf("less\n");
    else
        printf("other\n");

    return 0;
}

Output:

other
less

I'll also mention that type-punning via unions isn't 100% standard conformant. So you could also say it's undefined behavior.

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