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With an immutable object, where is it proper to wrap a contained collection as unmodifiable? I see 3 options:

  1. In the immutable object's factory:

    public class ImmutableFactory {
    
        public Immutable build(){
           List<Integer> values = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    
            values.add(1);
            values.add(2);
            values.add(3);
    
            return new Immutable(Collections.unmodifiableList(values), "hello");
        }
    }
    
  2. In the immutable's contructor

    public class Immutable {
    
        private final List<Integer> values;
        private final String hello;
    
        public Immutable(List<Integer> values, String hello) {
            this.values = Collections.unmodifiableList(values);
           this.hello = hello;
        }
    
        public List<Integer> getValues() {
            return values;
        }
    
        public String getHello() {
            return hello;
        }
    }
    
  3. In the immutable's accessor (if applicable).

    public class Immutable {
    
        private final List<Integer> values;
        private final String hello;
    
        public Immutable(List<Integer> values, String hello) {
            this.values = values;
            this.hello = hello;
        }
    
        public List<Integer> getValues() {
            return Collections.unmodifiableList(values);
        }
    
        public String getHello() {
            return hello;
        }
    }
    

Are there any other options and which one is proper?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd say if you create Immutable collection then you need to protect yourself from somebody modifying list that was given as an argument to constructor, you should protectively copy it.

public Immutable(List<Integer> values, String hello) {
    this.values = Collections.unmodifiableList(new ArrayList<Integer>(values));
    this.hello = hello;
}

I personally have long ago switched to Guava collections as there you can find interfaces for immutable collections. Your constructor would look like that:

public Immutable(ImmutableList<Integer> values, String hello) {
    this.values = values;
    this.hello = hello;
}

You'd be sure that argument you receive will not be modified by anyone.

It is usually a good idea to keep reference to immutable list within your immutable class as it then guarantees that you don't modify it by mistake.

Case (1) in my opinion makes sense only when factory method is the only way to create the immutable collection and even then it may break when someone refactors these classes. Unless there are other limitations it is always best to create self-sufficient classes.

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2  
Great points. I'm going to give guava a shot since I've been focusing on immutability. –  johncarl Sep 16 '12 at 22:03
    
if you had a getter that returns your collection 'values' would you return a type of List or ImmutableList? –  johncarl Sep 16 '12 at 22:18
1  
I'd just return List. (That said, Guava is smart about that -- if you call ImmutableList.copyOf defensively on a list that's already immutable, it won't actually do the copy, except in cases where that would cause memory leaks.) –  Louis Wasserman Sep 17 '12 at 2:38
    
@LouisWasserman Great to hear from Guava team member! Thank you for such an outstanding library! Out of general interest, could you please point me to a page where I could read about those edge cases that may lead to memory leaks? –  Ivan Koblik Sep 17 '12 at 6:35
1  
Not really? Mostly it's just the obvious cases -- e.g. if you have a hugeList.subList(0, 10), you want to explicitly copy that, because hugeList might be holding onto hundreds of thousands of elements you don't need. It's just the dumb cases like that. Probably the most general discussion of what copyOf does is here. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 17 '12 at 16:16

First of all, your code in all places is indeed immutable but only because an Integer is immutable.
If you had private final List<SomeCustomClass> values; instead, Collections.unmodifiableList(values); would not guarantee that individual SomeCustomClass of the list is immutable. You would have to code for that.
Having said that, another option is to do a defencive deep copy of the list. This approach also offers immutability.

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A List<someClassType> does not hold class-type items; it identifies them. If a List<someClassType> is made unmodifiable, it will always identify the same items. If one has a printed list of ten cars which happen to be red, painting one of the cars blue would not change the list. The list would still identify the same ten cars. Likewise, the state of a List<someClassType> does not encapsulate the state of the items thereon, but merely their identity. If one is holding a list of private objects whose state one is interested in, and one wants to give someone a list... –  supercat Sep 17 '12 at 16:11
    
...of objects whose states represent snapshots of those on the first list, one must new objects as snapshots of those in the first list, and generate a new list which identifies those new objects. It's too bad neither Java nor any .net languages allow one to specify that an object reference is held for the purpose of encapsulating the state of a private mutable object. The fact that there's no distinction made between variables which encapsulate unshared mutable state, identity, both, or neither, is to my mind a weakness rather than a strength. –  supercat Sep 17 '12 at 16:22

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