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So the following program should take in an input and output file as command line arguments. I'm entering in java FileCopy input.txt output.txt on the command line to run the program, which should put the file names in args. Testing this, I don't have any values in args. On top of this, method calls to fileExists() are not working, and I can't figure out why these calls aren't being executed. As a note, the getOutputFile method is incomplete, none of the code there currently gets executed due to the errors stated above.

class FileCopy
{
public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
{
    String infile = null;
    String outfile = null;
    BufferedReader stdin = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));    

    if (args.length >= 2) //both files given via command line
    {
        infile = args[0];
        if (fileExists(infile) == false)
        {
            infile = getInputFile();
        }
        outfile = args[1];
    }
    else if (args.length == 1) //input file given via command line
    {
        infile = args[0];
        outfile = getOutputFile(infile);
    }
    else //no files given on command line
    {
        infile = getInputFile();
        outfile = getOutputFile(infile);
    }

    //create file objects to use
    File in = new File(infile);
    File out = new File(outfile);

    /*
     *rest of code
     */
}

//get the input file from the user if given file does not exist
public static String getInputFile() //throws IOException
{
    BufferedReader stdin = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    String fileName = null;
    boolean haveFile = false;

    while(haveFile == false)
    {
        System.out.println("Enter a valid filename for input:");
        System.out.print(">> ");
        try
        {
            fileName = stdin.readLine();
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            System.out.println("Caught exception: " + e);
        }
        haveFile = fileExists(fileName);
    }

    return fileName;    
}

//get the output file and test things
public static String getOutputFile(String infile)
{
    BufferedReader stdin = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    File input = new File(infile);
    String filename = null;
    boolean more = true;
    while(more)
    {
        System.out.println("Enter a valid filename for output:");
        System.out.print(">> ");
        try
        {
            filename = stdin.readLine();
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            System.out.println("Caught exception: " + e);
        }
        File output = new File(filename);
        if (output.exists())
        {
            more = false;
        }
        if (filename == infile)
        {
            int selection;
            String inputString = null;

            System.out.println("The output file given matches the input file. Please choose an option:");
            System.out.println("1) Enter new filename");
            System.out.println("2) Overwrite existing file");
            System.out.println("3) Backup existing file");
            System.out.print(">> ");
            try
            {
                inputString = stdin.readLine();
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                System.out.println("Caught exception: " + e);
            }
            selection = Integer.valueOf(inputString);
            switch (selection)
            {
                case 1: //new filename
                case 2: //overwrite
                case 3: //backup
                default: System.exit(0);
            }
        }
    }
    return null;
}

//check the given file to see if it exists in the current working directory
public static boolean fileExists(String n)
{
    return (new File(n)).exists();
}
}
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I think you should pare down the question/code to something more focused. –  Bill Sep 16 '12 at 22:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

just tested this in eclipse debugger and the commandline arguments are correctly placed in args, you may check if the file you test with are in your project folder or actual dir "." because if not it will otherwise prompt for new files anyway

 if (fileExists(infile) == false)
    {
        infile = getInputFile();
    }
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so by not specifying a directory, it assumes the directory is "."? I assumed that the directory would be in the same place as the .class file. How would I go about changing the directory? –  speedofdark8 Sep 16 '12 at 22:35

Shouldn't the class be public?

public class FileCopy

Not sure if that will solve the problem or not.

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maybe? either way, nothing changed –  speedofdark8 Sep 16 '12 at 22:32

You will need to enter a fully qualified path, depending on your project's structure. In my test environment, it defaults to the root level of the project in the IDE. Normally, the new File(n) call will default to the system-dependent default directory. I did compile and run this from a single directory with no package and was able to use the abstract file names successfully (i.e. input.txt and output.txt). Is there any harm in forcing users to supply full qualified file names or at least only ever check the args values. This would allow you to fail early on invalid arguments, rather than having to worry about prompting the users for additional filenames.

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