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I want to change the variable's value in the function. my code is like this:

void change(char *buf){
    char str = "xxxxxxx";
    *buf = &str;
}
int main(){
    char *xxx = NULL;
    change(xxx);
}

when I debug with valgrind, it says:

==3709== Invalid write of size 1
==3709==    at 0x80483CA: change (test.c:5)
==3709==    by 0x80483E5: main (test.c:10)
==3709==  Address 0x0 is not stack'd, malloc'd or (recently) free'd
==3709== 
==3709== 
==3709== Process terminating with default action of signal 11 (SIGSEGV)
==3709==  Access not within mapped region at address 0x0
==3709==    at 0x80483CA: change (test.c:5)
==3709==    by 0x80483E5: main (test.c:10)

Can anyone help me? I'm new in C....

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There's something wrong with almost every line...please read more on pointers and pointer syntax. –  nneonneo Sep 16 '12 at 22:14
    
You've failed to enable and pay attention to compiler warnings before writing this question. Please don't do that. –  Kerrek SB Sep 16 '12 at 22:20
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a pointer to a pointer:

void change(char **buf)
{
    *buf = "xxxxxxx";
}

int main(void)
{
    char *xxx = NULL;
    change(&xxx);
}
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1  
Should note that this approach works because a string literal is being used, which is globally allocated a memory address via the data segment of the executable, so the pointer stays valid when it leaves function scope. It might fail to work on some other scope of string (that might be temporary or dynamically created in local scope). –  Preet Kukreti Sep 16 '12 at 22:30
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