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I want to create a hyperlink on my page that exports my model but I don't want to write a method for each model that I need to export. I want to end up with a method that can take a model as one of it's parameters and perform the export logic on that model. Is there a way that I can pass model that I send to my view back to a controller action?

Edit:

I have the following controller action-

    public ViewResult PenDaily(Nullable<DateTime> startDate = null, Nullable<DateTime> endDate = null, string listName = "")
    {
        //Removed code for brevity/clarity

        PenDailyViewModel penDailyView = new PenDailyViewModel();
        penDailyView.startDate = startDate;
        penDailyView.endDate = endDate;
        penDailyView.listNames = GetLists(m_db);
        penDailyView.penDaily = GeneratePenDaily(m_db, listName, startDate, endDate);
        penDailyView.penSummary = GeneratePenSummary(m_db, startDate, endDate, "").Where(a => a.listName == listName);

        return View(penDailyView);
    }

PenDailyViewModel is the model object that I pass to my Razor View. PenDaily and PenSummary are both IQueryable objects that are used in a table on the resulting page. PenDaily is the main set of data and PenSummary is used for the total row in the table footer.

I want to take this set of data and export it to a file. I have a function written to do so but I don't know how to utilize it from my page. I want to set things up so that when a user clicks a hyperlink they are prompted to save the export.

If it helps, my Razor view:

@model WebTools.Models.PenDailyViewModel

<table>
    <thead>Header Stuff</thead>
    <tbody>
    @foreach (var item in Model.penDaily)
    {
        //Generate table body
    }
    </tbody>
    <tfoot>
    @foreach (var item in Model.penSummary)
    {
        //Generate table footer
    }
    </tfoot>
</table>
share|improve this question
    
Unless I'm missing something, could you not just detach your entity from your database context and store it an ASP.NET session for use in another request? –  Sean Glover Sep 16 '12 at 23:01
    
@SeanGlover I suppose, I honestly don't really know what my options are here. I'm just trying to figure out what the best route to take is in order to achieve my goal: exporting my data without having to write multiple functions or hit my database multiple times. –  Kittoes Sep 16 '12 at 23:10
    
I'm very unclear on what you want to do. It seems as though you are asking about a solution to a problem you face that is attempting to solve your real problem, when you should be asking how to accomplish your actual problem. Provide a code example of what you want to do, and explain in better detail what it should do. –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 16 '12 at 23:35
    
@Kittoes We need to see some actual code. You use the word model rather... liberally, it seems. –  George Stocker Sep 16 '12 at 23:46
    
@GeorgeStocker Done and further explained what I have and what my goal is. And by Model I mean the Model used by Razor Views. The use was not meant to be liberal but specific. –  Kittoes Sep 16 '12 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

Personally, I always create separate models for the view (ie. a GET) or for any POSTS.

  • IndexViewModel
  • IndexInputModel

a lot of the time, these poco's are very similar.

Now the trick is to probably leverage AutoMapper so you can make it easier to support/maintain your code, instead of having lots of left-to-right code (eg. foo = viewmodel.Foo).

The idea is this: You have a base class library object that is used in the controller. It's the main POCO object. Next you have view models and input models with directly relate to the schema/structure of this POCO. Using AutoMapper (or lots of left-to-right code, if you're still new to this programming stuff), you can then easily 'copy' the data between the relevant objects.

Eg.

A sample view.

The view model.

public class IndexViewModel
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public Uri InfoUrl { get; set; }
}

The (View) Action method (error checking, etc.. stripped out).

// product/{id}   eg /products/5
public Action Index()
{
    // Load the Product.
    var product = YourRepository.Load(id);
    if (product == null)
    {
        return NotFound("Product can't be found.");
    }

    // Convert the product to this view requirements.
    // This will copy over the Name and the Uri.
    var model = Mapper.Map<Product, IndexViewModel>(product);

    return View(model);
}

What is imperative here is that there is a -hard- and -clear- representation of a model for that ONE view. Each view should have it's own model, because each view is unique.

Now you might say 'I don't want two models'. Well, I recommend you do. In fact, there's 3 models, here. The main one for the controller / services / business logic. The other two are for input (optional) or view (each action requires a result of some type).

Update

You said you want to avoid multiple trips to the DB. Fair call! :) The trick is to leverage CACHING instead. Not to store the data in the client? Why? Firstly, I can hack the client data in 1 sec. 2nd Caches are (generally) cheap and (generally) very fast.

Lets update the initial code...

// product/{id}   eg /products/5
public Action Index()
{
    // Load the Product from your cache
    var product = YourCache.Load(id);
    if (product == null)
    {
        return NotFound("Product can't be found.");
    }

    // Convert the product to this view requirements.
    // This will copy over the Name and the Uri.
    var model = Mapper.Map<Product, IndexViewModel>(product);

    return View(model);
}

.. and here's some sample Cache pseduo-code..

public class YourCache
{
    private static ObjectCache cache = MemoryCache.Default; 

    private IRepository Repository { get; set; }

    public YourCache(IRepository repository)
    {
        Repository = repository;
    }

    public Product Load(int id)
    {
        var product = cache["Product-" + id] as Product;
        if (product == null)
        {
            // Grab it and remember it.
            product = repository.Load(id);

            if (product != null)
            {
                cache.Set("Product-" + id, product, ....);
            }
        }

        return product;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's ok, so long as the data is not generated custom for each user. Cache would otherwise overwrite each other, and potentially show information a user is not supposed to see (or not let another user see information they should). You have to be very careful about this sort of things. –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 16 '12 at 23:52
    
@MystereMan the cache is set to hold common information. Something in the database is unqiue. So the cache would hold that info in memory. U then 'customize' the result to the view. The main objective of the Poster is to reduce the round trips to the db when they do 2 or more callbacks for what 'looks like' the same data. So 'Cache' all the things. Cache the db result, then project the custom view to the user. –  Pure.Krome Sep 17 '12 at 0:49

Pass the data you want to get back in a hidden form field, and then use a form instead of a simple hyperlink to make the call back to your controller. It will then receive the data from the hidden field along.

This is then a true page state, and not session state which may be out of sync with the page state (using back button, opening another tab/window, etc.).

That said, a trip to the DB is not necessarily a bad thing if the query is cheap (and therefore fast).

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter, a comment would be appreciated so that I know why my answer isn't good? –  Lucero Sep 17 '12 at 19:31
    
I didn't downvote you but I'm not sure that your solution works well for my question. Sure the second database hit isn't expensive AT ALL but I already have the data displayed in list-form on my screen. I would think that exporting that same data to a file in nearly the exact same format as it is displayed would be quite trivial. –  Kittoes Sep 20 '12 at 2:39
    
@Kittoes, creating a file and re-reading may be just as expensive as the DB query, and it creates other issues (how long do you keep those files, etc.). –  Lucero Sep 21 '12 at 8:06
    
I totally agree, I only desire for it to be generated client-side. –  Kittoes Sep 21 '12 at 8:17

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