Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
C++ deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’

I was looking into strings in C++ and tried an exercise to experiment the behaviour of some of the functions defined in the string library. I compiled the same program yesterday and everything worked with absolutely no warnings or errors. However, today I tried to compile the program again, but I received the following warning.

D:\C++ CodeBlocks Ex\Strings\main.cpp||In function 'int main()':|
D:\C++ CodeBlocks Ex\Strings\main.cpp|11|warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*'|
||=== Build finished: 0 errors, 1 warnings ===|

the warning referes to this line strncat("Hello",string,STRMAX-strlen(string));. I am not sure but from what I suspect is that the strncat function does not like the ideaa of having to concatenate an array of literals with a string constant. Any help on this will be much appreciated.

#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;

int main(){
    #define STRMAX 599
    char string[STRMAX+1];
    cout<<"Enter name: ";
    cin.getline(string,STRMAX);
    strncat("Hello",string,STRMAX-strlen(string));
    cout<<string;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Shai, Neolisk, femtoRgon, Mac, ybungalobill Feb 4 '13 at 21:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
I think the bigger issue here is that you're using strncat() entirely incorrectly. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 16 '12 at 23:29
3  
Also you should use std::string instead of a char array. –  Borgleader Sep 16 '12 at 23:30
3  
You're using C strings, not C++ strings. C++'s string class and its methods live in the <string> header, not <string.h> (which is usually written as <cstring> in C++). –  sepp2k Sep 16 '12 at 23:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're supplying the arguments to strncat() in the wrong order. The first argument is the string to append to; the second argument is the string to append. As written, you're trying to add the input string to the constant string "Hello", which isn't okay. You'll need to write this as two separate string operations.

Using the std::string class will save you a lot of grief.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info, I will look into the std::string class. Appreciated. –  Alex Goja Sep 16 '12 at 23:35

Since you're using C++, I would recommend avoiding char* and using std::string instead. If you need to pass in a char*, the string class has a c_str() method that returns the string in the form of a const char*.

Concatenation while using the string class is as easy as "Hello " + "World!".

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

const int MaxLength = 599;

int main() {
    std::string name;

    std::cout << "Enter a name: ";
    std::cin >> name;

    if (name.length() > MaxLength) {
        name = name.substr(0, MaxLength);
    }

    // These will do the same thing.
    // std::cout << "Hello " + name << endl;
    std::cout << "Hello " << name << endl;

    return 0;
}

This doesn't fully answer your question, but I guess it might help.

share|improve this answer

A better way of writing this is with the string class and skip char completely.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main(){
    std::string name;
    std::cout<<"Enter name: ";
    std::getline(std::cin, name);
    std::string welcomeMessage = "Hello " + name;
    std::cout<< welcomeMessage;
    // or just use:
    //std::cout << "Hello " << name;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
char * strncat(char * destination, const char * source, size_t num);

So your source and destination are the wrong way around.

share|improve this answer
    
Newbie error, thanks a lot, works now. –  Alex Goja Sep 16 '12 at 23:31

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.