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I have a CSV file which uses a highly customized format. Here, each number represents a the data in each of the 4 columns:

1 2 [3] 4

I need to restrict sed to only search and modify data appearing in the fourth column. Essentially, it must ignore all data on the line appearing before the first occurrence of a closing square bracket and space, ] and only modify data appearing after. E.g., file1.txt might contain this:

penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The penguin lives in cold places.
wolf dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat penguins.

The replacement might be sed 's/penguin/animal/g' file1.txt. After running the script, the output would look like this:

penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The animal lives in cold places.
wolf dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat animal.

In this case, all appearances of penguin were ignored prior to the first ] and were only changed on lines appearing after.

  • Additional closing brackets might appear later in the line, but only the first should be regarded as the division.

How can I have sed ignore the first three columns of this custom CSV format while it finds and replaces text?

I have GNU sed version 4.2.1.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally I'd do it the way shelter described (if I was just typing in a quick sed command line) but it has the disadvantage that once you start matching part of the input to retain it (with \1 etc) you have to match and replace everything and can no longer use simple replacements like s/penguin/animal/. If you are willing to add some boilerplate around the replacement you can stash away the beginning of the line in the hold buffer and then get it back:

sed -e 'h' \
    -e 's/.*\] //' \
    -e 's/penguin/animal/' \
    -e 'x' \
    -e 's/\] .*/] /' \
    -e 'G' \
    -e 's/\n//'

The h saves the original line in the hold space. Then we remove the prefix and do any substitution (picking your example here) or series of substitutions on the end of the line. Then x swaps the end and the saved copy. We remove the original end from the saved copy and use G to put them back together. The G adds a newline we don't want, so we remove that.

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You tell sed to search for the '] ' combination followed by .* (anything), and then as part of your replacement, you put back the ] chars.

The only problem is that sed usually "thinks" that a ] char is part of a character-class definition, so you have to escape it. Try

echo "a b [c] d" | sed 's/\] .*$/\] XYZ/'
a b [c] XYZ

Note, that because there was no opening [ char to indicate char-class def, you can get away with

echo "a b [c] d" | sed 's/] .*$/] XYZ/'
a b [c] XYZ

Edit

To fix just the 4th word,

echo "a b [c] d e" | sed 's/\] [^ ][^ ]*/\] XYZ/'
a b [c] XYZ e 

The addition from above [^ ][^ ]/ says "any-char-that-is-not-a-space" followed by any number of "any-char-that-is-not-a-space", so when the matcher finds the next space is stops matching.

final edit

echo "penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The penguin lives in cold places.
wold dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat penguins." \
| sed 's/\] The penguin \(.*$\)/] The animal \1/'

and as you're using gnu sed, you don't need to escape the (...) capturing parens.

echo "penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The penguin lives in cold places.
wold dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat penguins." \
| sed 's/\] The penguin (*$)/] The animal \1/'

output

penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The animal lives in cold places.
wolf dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat penguins.

Depending on the version of sed you are using. There is a pretty large difference bewtween sed for the AIX, vs solaris, VS the GNU seds usually found in a lunix.

If you have other questions about using sed, it is usually helpful to include the output of sed --version, or sed -V. If no response from those commands, try what sed. Else include the OS name for uname.

IHTH

share|improve this answer
    
I should have been more specific about what kind of replacement. I am not replacing everything after that, but replacing specific words. E.g., a b [c] This is some text. The replacement is like s/some/XYZ/ which would replace the word some, so it becomes a b [c] This is XYZ text. If some appears in other columns, e.g. a some [c] d or a b [some text] d, it is ignored and not replaced. – Village Sep 17 '12 at 0:20
    
please edit your question with sample input and required output. Too hard to read inside of a comment. Good luck. – shellter Sep 17 '12 at 0:21
    
sorry, I've run out of time. but the key is that you're searching for ] The penguine \(.*$\) and replacing with ] The animal \1`. Read the grymoire.com/Unix/Sed.html to understand capture groups. Good luck. – shellter Sep 17 '12 at 0:31

Assuming you only have a single occurrence of a closing bracket, I would use awk to do this:

awk 'BEGIN {FS=OFS="]"} { gsub(/penguin/, "animal", $2) }1' file.txt

Results:

penguin bird [lives in Antarctica] The animal lives in cold places.
wolf dog [lives in Antarctica with penguins] The wolf likes to eat animals.
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This might work for you (GNU sed);

sed  -i 's/\]/&\n/;h;s/.*\n//;s/penguin/animal/g;H;g;s/\n.*.\n//' file

Explanation:

  • s/\]/&\n/ split line with a \n marker
  • h copy the line
  • s/.*\n// delete the part of the line you don't want to change
  • s/penguin/animal/g change the part you want to change
  • H;g add it back to the original line
  • s/\n.*\n// delete the part of the original line that you wanted to change

This applies to every line, if the change is conditional, use:

sed  -i '/\]/!b;s//&\n/;h;s/.*\n//;s/penguin/animal/g;H;g;s/\n.*.\n//' file

An alternative (perhaps easier method):

sed ':a;s/\(\].*\)penguin/\1animal/;ta' file
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