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Sometimes the event pattern is used to raise events in MVVM applications by or a child viewmodel to send a message to its parent viewmodel in a loosely coupled way like this.

Parent ViewModel

searchWidgetViewModel.SearchRequest += (s,e) => 
{
    SearchOrders(searchWidgitViewModel.SearchCriteria);
};

SearchWidget ViewModel

public event EventHandler SearchRequest;

SearchCommand = new RelayCommand(() => {

    IsSearching = true;
    if (SearchRequest != null) 
    {
        SearchRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
    IsSearching = false;
});

In refactoring my application for .NET4.5 I am making as much as code possible to use async and await. However the following doesn't work (well I really wasn't expecting it to)

 await SearchRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty);

The framework definitely does this to call event handlers such as this, but I'm not sure how it does it?

private async void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
   textBlock1.Text = "Click Started";
   await DoWork();
   textBlock2.Text = "Click Finished";
}

Anything I've found on the subject of raising events asynchrously is ancient but I can't find something in the framework to support this.

How can I await the calling of an event but remain on the UI thread.

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What do you mean "doesn't work"? –  Peter Ritchie Sep 16 '12 at 23:44
    
it doesn't compile. you can't await something that returns void which this does –  Simon_Weaver Sep 16 '12 at 23:58
    
Do you really need to wait until all the handlers complete? Can't you just start them and let their async parts complete without waiting for them? –  svick Sep 17 '12 at 5:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Events don't mesh perfectly with async and await, as you've discovered.

The way UIs handle async events is different than what you're trying to do. The UI provides a SynchronizationContext to its async events, enabling them to resume on the UI thread. It does not ever "await" them.

Best Solution (IMO)

I think the best option is to build your own async-friendly pub/sub system, using AsyncCountdownEvent to know when all handlers have completed.

Lesser Solution #1

async void methods do notify their SynchronizationContext when they start and finish (by incrementing/decrementing the count of asynchronous operations). All UI SynchronizationContexts ignore these notifications, but you could build a wrapper that tracks it and returns when the count is zero.

Here's an example, using AsyncContext from my AsyncEx library:

SearchCommand = new RelayCommand(() => {
  IsSearching = true;
  if (SearchRequest != null) 
  {
    AsyncContext.Run(() => SearchRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty));
  }
  IsSearching = false;
});

However, in this example the UI thread is not pumping messages while it's in Run.

Lesser Solution #2

You could also make your own SynchronizationContext based on a nested Dispatcher frame that pops itself when the count of asynchronous operations reaches zero. However, you then introduce re-entrancy problems; DoEvents was left out of WPF on purpose.

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One workaround I've found is this :

Declare a delegate. This is identical to EventHandler but returns a task instead of void

public delegate Task AsyncEventHandler(object sender, EventArgs e);

You can then run the following and as long as the handler declared in the parent uses async and await properly then this will run asynchronously:

if (SearchRequest != null) 
{
    await SearchRequest(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

I'm also not sure about how this will work if there are multiple subscribers. I'd rather find something in the framework to support this properly.

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I'm not clear on what you mean by "How can I await the calling of an event but remain on the UI thread". Do you want the event handler to be executed on the UI thread? If that's the case then you can do something like this:

var h = SomeEvent;
if (h != null)
{
    await Task.Factory.StartNew(() => h(this, EventArgs.Empty),
        Task.Factory.CancellationToken,
        Task.Factory.CreationOptions,
        TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

Which wraps the invocation of the handler in a Task object so that you can use await, since you can't use await with a void method--which is where your compile error stems from.

But, I'm not sure what benefit you expect to get out of that.

I think there's a fundamental design issue there. It's fine to kick of some background work on a click event and you can implement something that supports await. But, what's the effect on how the UI can be used? e.g. if you have a Click handler that kicks off an operation that takes 2 seconds, do you want the user to be able to click that button while the operation is pending? Cancellation and timeout are additional complexities. I think much more understanding of the usability aspects needs to be done here.

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in the example above I put 'IsSearching=true' and 'IsSearching=false' around the call. These are MVVM properties that would need to execute on the UI thread, prehaps to gray out the 'Search' button. Ultimately my question is that WPF (the Dispatcher?) can call a void event handler asynchronously like the 'button1_Click' event above and I want to know how they do that –  Simon_Weaver Sep 17 '12 at 0:09
    
@Simon_Weaver Well, you can't await a method that returns void, you can only await a method that returns Task<T> or Task. So, if you want to invoke an event handler asynchronously, you have to wrap it in a Task object, which I showed in my answer. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 17 '12 at 0:43
    
so do you think this is what WPF does when it calls my event handlers that are declared to be async? –  Simon_Weaver Sep 17 '12 at 1:12
    
The async modifier just tells the compiler to generate an async state machine to manage any await keywords it encounters within the method (more to manage the lines after the awaits). It doesn't do anything as far as externally viewing the method. i.e., it doesn't make the method usable by await. await only depends on the method returning a Task variant. So, WPF is probably just calling your method synchronously. To call it asynchronously with await it would have to do what I detailed in my answer: wrap it in a Task object. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 17 '12 at 2:21
    
You can certainly write an event handler that returns Task, but nothing else is going to call it asynchronously, directly. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 17 '12 at 2:22

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