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In a stack-based intermediate language, such as CIL or Java bytecode, why are there local variables? One could just use only the stack. May not be so easy for hand-crafted IL, but a compiler can surely do it. But my C# compiler does not.

Both the stack and the local variables are private to the method and go out of scope when the method returns. So it could not have anything to do with side-effects visible from outside the method (from another thread).

A JIT compiler would eliminate loads and stores to both stack slots and local variables when generating machine code, if I am correct, so the JIT compiler also does not see the need for local variables.

On the other hand, the C# compiler generates loads and stores for local variables, even when compiling with optimizations enabled. Why?


Take for example, the following contrived example code:

static int X()
{
    int a = 3;
    int b = 5;
    int c = a + b;
    int d;
    if (c > 5)
        d = 13;
    else
        d = 14;
    c += d;
    return c;
}

When compiled in C#, with optimizations, it produces:

    ldc.i4.3        # Load constant int 3
    stloc.0         # Store in local var 0
    ldc.i4.5        # Load constant int 5
    stloc.1         # Store in local var 1
    ldloc.0         # Load from local var 0
    ldloc.1         # Load from local var 1
    add             # Add
    stloc.2         # Store in local var 2
    ldloc.2         # Load from local var 2
    ldc.i4.5        # Load constant int 5
    ble.s label1    # If less than, goto label1
    ldc.i4.s 13     # Load constant int 13
    stloc.3         # Store in local var 3
    br.s label2     # Goto label2
label1:
    ldc.i4.s 14     # Load constant int 14
    stloc.3         # Store in local var 3
label2:
    ldloc.2         # Load from local var 2
    ldloc.3         # Load from local var 3
    add             # Add
    stloc.2         # Store in local var 2
    ldloc.2         # Load from local var 2
    ret             # Return the value

Note the loads and stores to the four local variables. I could write the exact same operations (disregarding the obvious constant propagation optimization) without using any local variables.

    ldc.i4.3        # Load constant int 3
    ldc.i4.5        # Load constant int 5
    add             # Add
    dup             # Duplicate top stack element
    ldc.i4.5        # Load constant int 5
    ble.s label1    # If less than, goto label1
    ldc.i4.s 13     # Load constant int 13
    br.s label2     # Goto label2
label1:
    ldc.i4.s 14     # Load constant int 14
label2:
    add             # Add
    ret             # Return the value

It seems correct to me, and a lot shorter and more efficient. So, why do stack-based intermediate languages have local variables? And why does the optimizing compiler use them so extensively?

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2  
You can't always make such a simple transformation as you have demonstrated in your example. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 16 '12 at 23:40
    
Is this question asking why "named slots" are needed or why the C# "optimized" output looks overly verbose (e.g. are used in this case)? –  user166390 Sep 17 '12 at 0:02
    
Even if "named slots" are needed or useful in some cases (which cases?), why doesn't the optimizing compiler eliminate most loads and stores? It seems so trivial. I must be missing something. –  Virtlink Sep 17 '12 at 0:06
    
@Virtlink Ah, but that seems like a different question than the one presented in the title and comes into play later in the post :-) I would suggest focusing on two separate but related questions (one that is in the title, which is more hypothetical) and then the one that focuses on why the (particular) C# compiles as it does. I wonder which IL will actually result in the more efficient runtime execution .. –  user166390 Sep 17 '12 at 0:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depending on the situation, but especially when calls are involved where the parameters have to be re-ordered to match the call, a pure stack is not enough if you don't have registers or variables at your disposal. If you wanted to make this stack-only, you'd need additional stack manipulation abilties, such as the ability to exchange/swap the two top items of the stack.

In the end, while it may be possible to express everything as pure stack-based in that case, it can add a whole lot of complexity to the code, bloating it and making it more difficult to optimize (local variables are ideal candidates for being cached in registers).

Also remember that in .NET you can pass parameters by reference, how could you create the IL for this method call without a local variable?

bool TryGet(int key, out string value) {}
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I don't see how that signature changes anything wrt the question itself. There could be a "writeToOutParam" operation (a side-effect) for IL that was entirely stack-based otherwise. –  user166390 Sep 17 '12 at 0:06
    
I think Lucero is referring to the caller's side of the call. When there are no local variables, what address of a local variable is passed to the TryGet method as its second argument? But this could, of course, be a 'pointer' to a stack slot. And aren't values on the stack even better candidates for being cached in registers? –  Virtlink Sep 17 '12 at 0:11

This answer is purely speculative -- but I suspect that the answer has 3 parts.

1: The code transforms to prefer Dup over local variables is very non-trivial, even when you ignore side effects. It adds a lot of complexity and potentially a lot of execution time to the optimization.

2: You can't ignore side effects. In the example where everything is just a literal, it is very easy to know that the values are in stack or locals, and are therefore under complete control of the current instructions. Once those values come from the heap, static memory, or method calls, you can no longer shuffle things around to use Dup instead of locals. Changing the order may change how things actually work, and cause unintended consequences due to side effects or external access to shared memory. This means that usually, you can't make these optimizations.

3: The assumption that stack values are faster that local variables is not a good assumption -- it may be true for a particular IL->machine code transform that stack values are faster, but there is no reason why a smart JIT would not put a stack location into memory and a local variable into a register. It is the JIT's job to know what is fast and what is slow for the current machine, and it is the JIT's job to solve the problem. By design, the CIL compiler does not have an answer to whether locals or stack are faster; and so the measurable difference between these results is only in code size.

Put together, 1 means that it is hard and has a non-trivial cost, 2 means that real world cases where it would be valuable are few, and 3 means that 1 and 2 are irrelevant anyways.

Even if the goal is to minimize CIL size, which IS a measurable goal for the CIL compiler, reason #2 describes this as a small improvement to a small amount of cases. The Pareto principle can't tell us that it is a BAD idea to implement this kind of optimization, but it will recommend that there are probably BETTER uses of developer time.

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and something I forgot -- in a true JIT where compilation speed matters, avoiding the Dup operations can lead to a smaller maximum stack size, which can make life easier for the JIT. Given equal results, it is better to reach the result faster than slower. –  danwyand Dec 17 '13 at 23:41

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