Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have command line this:

xclip -o -sel clip | sed -e 's/^ *"\(.*\)"+\?/\1/g' | tr -d '\n' |
    sed -e 's/.\{,55\}/"&"+\n/g' |
    sed -e "2,$ s/^/$(seq 22 | xargs -I{} echo -n ' ')/" |
    sed -e '$ s/+$//' | xclip -sel clip

which format string in source code (I use it to format long string in javascript file - 55 and 22 are harcoded width and indent)

var foo = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit"+
          ". Nulla sed dolor nisl, in suscipit justo. Donec a enim"+
          " et est porttitor semper at vitae augue. Proin at nulla"+
          " at dui mattis mattis. Nam a volutpat ante. Aliquam con"+
          "sequat dui eu sem convallis ullamcorper."

but when I copy past code inside parentheses var foo = foo.bar() I got this

var foo = foo.bar("Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit"+
                  ". Nulla sed dolor nisl, in suscipit justo. Donec a enim"+
                  " et est porttitor semper at vitae augue. Proin at nulla"+
                  " at dui mattis mattis. Nam a volutpat ante. Aliquam con"+
                  "sequat dui eu sem convallis ullamcorper."
)

New line after last quote, not the big deal but anybody know how can I remove that last new line?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's one way of doing it, using awk. Setting RS (record separator) to the empty string tells awk to treat blank lines (i.e. two consecutive \n) as record separators. Setting FS to \n causes awk to take \n as field separators instead of white-space. (Setting RS to the empty string also causes \n to be used as a field separator, but we want to avoid having other whitespace recognized.) Finally, we set OFS (output field separator) to be the string we want between lines (closing quote, plus, linefeed, 22 spaces, opening quote) and setting ORS (output record separator) to an empty string causes awk to not write any linefeed at the end.

I use fold to split the lines into 55-byte chunks instead of sed, partly because it seems tidier, and partly because, unlike sed, it doesn't add a new line at the end of the input if there wasn't one to start with.

The seemingly redundant $1=$1 causes awk to recreate $0, which has the effect of using OFS as the output field separator between the fields. Otherwise, it is only used to separate separate print arguments.

The first and last line are unchanged from the OP.

xclip -o -sel clip | sed -e 's/^ *"\(.*\)"+\?/\1/g' | tr -d '\n' |
fold -b -w55 |
awk -vFS=$'\n' -vOFS="$(printf '"+\n%22s"' '')" \
    -vRS='' -vORS='' \
    '{$1=$1; print "\"" $0 "\""}' |
xclip -sel clip
share|improve this answer
    
Great, I never use awk a lot, need to take a closer look at it. And thanks for fold I was searching for this command but thought it's called cols or something. –  jcubic Sep 17 '12 at 13:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.