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I've been instructed "not to bother with LIKE" and use ~ instead. What is wrong with LIKE and how is ~ different?

Does ~ have a name in this context or do people say "use the tilde operator"?

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Instructed by whom, out of interest? I'm curious. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 7:40
    
@CraigRinger Course instructor. –  Celeritas Sep 17 '12 at 7:50
    
Gotcha, thanks. I just meant "where" more than "whom", sorry. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 7:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

~ is the regular expression operator, and has the capabilities implied by that. You can specify a full range of regular expression wildcards and quantifiers; see Section 9.7.3 of the documentation for details. It is certainly more powerful than LIKE, and should be used when that power is needed, but they serve different purposes.

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9  
This is very bad advice. Whenever you can use the SQL standard LIKE it is generally preferable to a regular expression. It is simpler, much faster and easier to use with appropriate indexes. Regular expressions are more powerful, but slower and non-standard. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 '12 at 11:56
4  
That's why I said "when appropriate, but they serve different purposes." –  syrion Sep 17 '12 at 12:02
3  
should be used in preference to the LIKE operator when appropriate is just wrong. When you have a choice, use LIKE. When you don't have a choice, you don't have a choice anyway. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 '12 at 13:07
1  
Edited to reflect this discussion. –  syrion Sep 17 '12 at 13:29
3  
Removed the downvote accordingly as the answer doesn't strike me as wrong any more. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 '12 at 13:45

There is nothing wrong with LIKE and, IMO, no reason to favour ~ over it. Rather the opposite. LIKE is SQL-standard. So is SIMILAR TO, but it isn't widely supported. PostgreSQL's ~ operator (or posix regular expression matching operator) isn't SQL standard.

For that reason, I prefer to use LIKE where it's expressive enough and I only use ~ when I need the power of full regular expressions. If I ever need to port databases it's one less thing that'll hurt. I've tended to use SIMILAR TO when LIKE isn't powerful enough, but after Erwin's comments I think I'll stop doing that and use ~ when LIKE doesn't do the job.

Also, PostgreSQL can use a b-tree index for prefix searches (eg LIKE 'TEST%') with LIKE or SIMILAR TO if the database is in the C locale or the index has text_pattern_ops. Contrary to what I wrote earlier, Pg can also use such an index for a left-anchored posix regex, it just needs an explicit '^TEST.*' so the regex can only match from the beginning. My post earlier incorrectly stated that ~ couldn't use an index for a prefix search. With that difference eliminated it's really down to whether you want to stick to standard compliant features where possible or not.

See this demo SQLFiddle; note the different execution plans. Note the difference between ~ '1234.*' and ~ '^1234.*'.

Given sample data:

create table test (
   blah text
);
insert into test (blah)  select x::text from generate_series(1,10000) x;
create index test_blah_txtpat_idx ON test(blah text_pattern_ops);

note that ~ uses a seqscan even when it's substantially more expensive (artifically so due to enable_seqscan) because it has no alternative, while LIKE uses the index. However, a corrected ~ with a left anchor uses the index too:

regress=# SET enable_seqscan = 'f';
SET
regress=# explain select 1 from test where blah ~ '12.*';
                                QUERY PLAN                                 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on test  (cost=10000000000.00..10000000118.69 rows=2122 width=0)
   Filter: (blah ~ '12.*'::text)
(2 rows)
regress=# explain select 1 from test where blah like '12%';
                                     QUERY PLAN                                     
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on test  (cost=4.55..46.76 rows=29 width=0)
   Filter: (blah ~~ '12%'::text)
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on test_blah_txtpat_idx  (cost=0.00..4.54 rows=29 width=0)
         Index Cond: ((blah ~>=~ '12'::text) AND (blah ~<~ '13'::text))
(4 rows)
regress=# explain select 1 from test where blah ~ '^12.*';
                                     QUERY PLAN                                      
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Bitmap Heap Scan on test  (cost=5.28..51.53 rows=101 width=0)
   Filter: (blah ~ '^12.*'::text)
   ->  Bitmap Index Scan on test_blah_txtpat_idx  (cost=0.00..5.25 rows=100 width=0)
         Index Cond: ((blah ~>=~ '12'::text) AND (blah ~<~ '13'::text))
(4 rows)
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Personally I disagree on SIMILAR TO. I wrote more on that in my answer. Also, it's worth mentioning, that the very common left-anchored search patterns are supported even for the regular expression operator ~. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 '12 at 13:03
    
@ErwinBrandstetter Ah, I forgot to anchor it left. Will correct my post. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 13:06
    
@ErwinBrandstetter Corrected. Thanks. –  Craig Ringer Sep 17 '12 at 13:14

There are a number of operators available for pattern matching in PostgreSQL. LIKE, SIMILAR TO and ~ are covered in this chapter of the manual.

If you can, use LIKE (~~), it's fastest.
If you can't, use a regular expression (~), it's more powerful.
Never user SIMILAR TO. It's utterly pointless. More on this further down.

If you install the additional module pg_trgm, you also have the similarity operator % at your disposal.

To make the picture complete I should also mention text search here, which has its own infrastructure.

Index support is possible for each or these operators - in limited ways. Index support regularly trumps other options when performance is needed. But there is a lot of leeway in the details, even with indexes.

Without pg_trgm, there is index support available for left anchored search patterns. If your database cluster runs with a different locale than 'C', you need an index with a special operator class for this, like text_pattern_ops or varchar_pattern_ops. And yes, basic left-anchored regular expressions are supported, too.
Example:

CREATE TABLE foo (bar text);
INSERT INTO foo(bar) SELECT x::text FROM generate_series(1,10000) x;
CREATE INDEX foo_bar_text_pattern_idx ON foo(bar text_pattern_ops);

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE bar ~ '^1234.*';   -- left anchored pattern

-> sqlfiddle

With pg_trgm installed, you also have the option to use GIN or GiST indexes with the operator classes gist_trgm_ops or gin_trgm_ops. These indexes can support any LIKE expression, not just left anchored. However, there is no support for regular expressions yet (other than basic left-anchored ones). Alexander Korotkov and others are working on it:
http://archives.postgresql.org/pgsql-hackers/2011-11/msg01297.php
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_hooLbByX4

SIMILAR TO is part of the SQL standard, but it is very odd syntax, and the only reason PostgreSQL supports it, is to stay standard compliant. Internally, every SIMILAR TO expression is rewritten with a regular expression. Therefore, for any given SIMILAR TO expression, there is at least one regexp doing the same job faster. I never use SIMILAR TO. More details in this closely related answer at dba.SE.

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2  
I read recently that SIMILAR TO might be eliminated from the next version of the ANSI SQL standard (in favor of REGEXP_LIKE) anyway. And I'm not sure that the gains in portability from using SIMILAR TO over ~ are worth it since other DBMSs (Oracle, SQL Server, MySQL) don't support the standard. –  David Faber Sep 17 '12 at 13:11
    
@DavidFaber: I couldn't agree more. –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 '12 at 13:14

The ~~ operator is equivalent to LIKE. ~, on the other hand, will match using a POSIX regular expression.

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2  
Just an opinion (and thus a comment), but I dislike the ~~ operator, because it's Postgres-specific and loses SQL portability for no real gain. –  syrion Sep 17 '12 at 2:17
1  
@syrion: Sorry for being unclear, I completely agree—I'm just saying that ~ doesn't do the same thing as LIKE does. –  user1675187 Sep 17 '12 at 2:20

Yes, it stands for POSIX regex. Another alternative is to use the SQL standard approach to regular expressions with the "SIMILAR TO" operator,though it provides a more limited set of features,might be easier to understand. I think this is a good reference from dba exchange: http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/10694/pattern-matching-with-like-similar-to-or-regular-expressions-in-postgresql

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I just did a quick and simple benchmark to look at the performance difference between the two operators when no indexes are involved:

postgres=# \timing
Timing is on.
postgres=# SELECT count(1) FROM (SELECT val from generate_series(1, 10000000) x(val) WHERE val::text LIKE '%5%') AS x;
  count
─────────
 5217031
(1 row)

Time: 5631.662 ms
postgres=# SELECT count(1) FROM (SELECT val from generate_series(1, 10000000) x(val) WHERE val::text ~ '5') AS x;
  count
─────────
 5217031
(1 row)

Time: 10612.406 ms

In this example the LIKE operator is almost twice as fast as the ~ operator. So if speed is of the essence I would lean towards LIKE, though be careful not to optimize prematurely. ~ gives you a lot more flexibility.

For those of you who are interested, here are EXPLAIN plans for the above queries:

postgres=# EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT count(1) FROM (SELECT val from generate_series(1, 10000000) x(val) WHERE val::text LIKE '%5%') AS x;
                                                              QUERY PLAN
──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 Aggregate  (cost=20.00..20.01 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=9967.748..9967.749 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Function Scan on generate_series x  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=1732.084..7404.755 rows=5217031 loops=1)
         Filter: ((val)::text ~~ '%5%'::text)
         Rows Removed by Filter: 4782969
 Total runtime: 9997.587 ms
(5 rows)

postgres=# EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT count(1) FROM (SELECT val from generate_series(1, 10000000) x(val) WHERE val::text ~ '5') AS x;
                                                              QUERY PLAN
───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────
 Aggregate  (cost=20.00..20.01 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=15118.061..15118.061 rows=1 loops=1)
   ->  Function Scan on generate_series x  (cost=0.00..17.50 rows=1000 width=0) (actual time=1724.591..12516.996 rows=5217031 loops=1)
         Filter: ((val)::text ~ '5'::text)
         Rows Removed by Filter: 4782969
 Total runtime: 15147.950 ms
(5 rows)
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2  
Wow, that's a huge difference. Great example! –  Jordan Parmer Mar 6 at 19:35
2  
can you provide the explain plan to see if the explanation for the delta is consistent with the explanation Craig Ringer is showing above? –  eharik Mar 6 at 19:42
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Great suggestion, @eharik. Done. –  Alex Mar 6 at 19:54
1  
So with an index-less test data set like what you're presented here your actually just confirming what Erwin is saying. Namely that ~~ is just a faster operator than ~. –  eharik Mar 6 at 20:04

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