Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to deal with a big hashcode value in rolling hash Rabin-Karp algorithm ? I use modular arithmetic to avoid negative number, however there is a problem when the hashcode exceeds my modulo number (N = 83559671). I set my base number to be prime (the number to calculate hashcode) as well as the modulo number (really big), but it doesn't work with long string. Can anyone see the problem?

Here is my code.

   public static void main(String [] args){

       int P = 13;         // base
       long M = 83559671;
       long iHash = 0;    
       String word = "abcbadccaaaabbbb";
       int WINDOW = 9;

       for(int i = 0; i < WINDOW; i++){
            iHash = int_mod(int_mod(iHash*P, M) + word[i], M);
       }

       for(int i = WINDOW; i < word.length; i++){
            iHash = int_mod(iHash - word[i-WINDOW] * get_pow(P, WINDOW-1, M), M);
            iHash = int_mod(iHash * P, M);
            iHash = int_mod(iHash + word[i], M);
       }

   }
   public static long get_pow(int p, int t, long M){
        long a = 1;
        for(int i = 0 ; i < t; i++){
              a = int_mod(a * p, M);
        }
        return a;
   }

   public static long int_mod(long a, long b){
        return (a % b+ b) % b;
   }

The problem is when I have any string's length longer than 8 then the hashcode of the string exceeds the modulo number 83559671, and that leads to a wrong answer when I make a comparison. Any shorter strings work properly.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to avoid negative numbers? Treat them as unsigned, if you have to, but I don't think you should need to do any modulus at all other than the unavoidable 2^32. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 17 '12 at 3:06
    
I am using Java, and I think Java doesn't support unsigned ? if i remember correctly, or do you mean BigInteger ? –  user1389813 Sep 17 '12 at 3:51
    
Java's integers are normally signed, but you can treat them as if they were unsigned and most things will actually work the same. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 17 '12 at 6:11
    
I mean I can use it, but isn't it going to be incorrect if you have a negative hashcode ? just by shifting you subtract out the left-most character from that negative number and add a new character to it. Isn't it going to lead to a different hashcode eventually ? –  user1389813 Sep 18 '12 at 1:05
    
Nope, it isn't. Subtraction, addition, and multiplication all work for signed integers exactly as they would for unsigned integers, all mod 2^32. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 18 '12 at 4:50

2 Answers 2

You don't need to do the modulus at all. Here's a demo:

public class Foo {
  private static int hash(String s) {
    int hash = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
      hash *= 31;
      hash += s.charAt(i);
    }
    return hash;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    String s1 = "abcdefghij";
    String s2 = s1.substring(1) + "k";
    int pow = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < s1.length(); i++) {
      pow *= 31;
    }
    System.out.printf("hash(%s) = %d%n", s1, hash(s1));
    System.out.printf("hash(%s) = %d%n31 * hash(%s) - (31^%d * %s) + %s = %s%n",
        s2,
        hash(s2),
        s1,
        s1.length(),
        s1.charAt(0),
        s2.charAt(s2.length() - 1),
        31 * hash(s1) - (pow * s1.charAt(0)) + s2.charAt(s2.length() - 1));
  }
}

This (correctly) prints out:

hash(abcdefghij) = -634317659
hash(bcdefghijk) = 21611845
31 * hash(abcdefghij) - (31^10 * a) + k = 21611845
share|improve this answer
    
Will int get overflow by any chance ? Could we use long ? will int be suffice and good enough ? –  user1389813 Sep 19 '12 at 17:56
1  
We don't have to care about overflow. Overflow is fine. That's the point. (Overflow is equivalent to a modulus of 2^32, essentially, so it works out.) –  Louis Wasserman Sep 19 '12 at 19:16
    
You are right it does loop back to positive number, so we don't need to switch to a long in any cases ? and now seems like mod is not necessary for a big number but will it be helpful if we use it ? –  user1389813 Sep 19 '12 at 21:11
    
It won't really help, but it will make the code more confusing and easier to mess up. Just don't even bother. –  Louis Wasserman Sep 19 '12 at 21:26
    
Nice post! Stupidly semantic comment, but if it was me I'd rename pow to mult since it is functioning as a multiplier, not a power. ;-) For someone learning from this post, that could make a difference. –  The111 Aug 12 '13 at 21:13

Why don't you treat your string as a polynomial? Suppose you have a string S of length n. Now take a look at the following function: F(x) = S[0]*x^(n-1) + S[1]*x^(n-2) + ... + S[i]*x^(n-i-1) + ... + S[n - 2]*x + S[n-1]. What happens if you try to compute F(P), where P is a base from your code snippet? Well, you'd get exactly the Rabin-Karp hash of string S. But since F(x) is a polynomial, we can use Horner's rule to compute the F(P). The resulting value might be very big, hence we use modular arithmetic:

static final long M = 83559671;
static final int Base = 13;

static long hash(String s, int from, int to) {
    int iHash = 0;
    for(int i = from; i < to; i++) {
        iHash *= Base;
        iHash += s.charAt(i);
        iHash %= M;
    }
    return iHash;
}

You can use this function to obtain the hash of a string to be found in a text. And for initial window in the text. Then you can shift window and recalculate hash:

static void find(String pattern, String text) {
    if(text.length() < pattern.length()) return;
    int len = pattern.length();
    long ph = hash(pattern, 0, len);
    long h = hash(text, 0, len);
    long basePower = mpow(Base, len);

    if(h == ph) System.out.println("match at 0");
    for(int i = len; i < text.length(); i++) {
        h *= Base;
        h += text.charAt(i);
        h -= basePower * text.charAt(i - len);
        h = mod(h);
        if(h == ph) System.out.println("match at " + (i - len + 1));
    }
}

static long mod(long a) {
    a %= M;
    if(a < 0) {
        a += M;
    }
    return a;
}

static long mpow(long x, int k) {
    long result = 1;
    for(; k > 0; k >>= 1) {
        if(k % 2 == 1) {
            result = mod(result * x);
        }
        x = mod(x * x);
    }
    return result;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    find("abracadabra", "abracadabracadabra");
}

For more information on this approach I recommend to refer to CLRS.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't really get it...don't you need to take out the left-most character every time while shifting ? –  user1389813 Sep 18 '12 at 1:04
    
Sorry, I misunderstood your question. I've updated my answer –  Sergey Weiss Sep 18 '12 at 13:15
    
Pretty much like mine, isn't it ? What happen if h *= Base becomes negative ? Java long is signed as well, so if your pattern string is long and your prime base is large then you will hit the negative hashcode issue, correct ? and that's my question –  user1389813 Sep 19 '12 at 14:34
    
well, what is a negative number modulo M? Say, -x? It's M - (x mod M). I handle this situation in mod function –  Sergey Weiss Sep 19 '12 at 19:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.